The Fresh Loaf

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mcs's picture
mcs

The Big Adventure

So we just got back from our two-week vacation in Europe-   Spain, France and Holland to be precise.

I'm going to roll through some of the highlights, but if you'd like to see a lot more pictures of the Big Adventure, you can check them out on my Facebook page here.

We landed in Madrid about mid-day, found our hotel, washed up a bit and headed out into town.  If you ever happen to make your way there, you should put this place at the top of your places to visit.  The Mercado de San Miguel is an indoor market with lots of booths filled with food and wine.  Yes, and because it's in Spain this means that you're free to eat, drink, and be merry while you walk and sample everything from fresh mozzarella with blueberries on a sliced baguette to a glass of wine from La Rioja.

 

Next we move onto the island of Ibiza where we visited my friend Helena.  Although its recent reputation is as the party capital of Europe, Ibiza has a rich history with relics dating back to Carthaginian times.  Helna hosted us at her home and gave us a super tour of the beaches, the local foods, and fantastic churches and museums. 

 

Our next stop was further north in the land of Spanish Wine known as La Rioja.  Two of our friends were generous enough to give us the local tour complete with visits to Logroño, Santa Lucia, and Laguardia.  In the first picture, accomplished sculptor Félix Reyes poses with some of his work and my friend Javier.  Below, there's nothing like a night on the town in Logroño with good friends, food, and wine.

 

Next, we took the train up to France and managed to spend a night in the picturesque village of Saint Emilion.  Since we were a bit early for tourist season, we had the streets to ourselves as we walked through the town at night after an outside dinner in the evening.

 

After spending a night in the very scenic town of Tours, we began our three day visit to Paris.  Of course we had the obligitory visits to the Louvre, Eiffel Tower and Notre Dame.  Breakfast and/or lunch was spent touring the various boulangeries- pictured here are Michel Deschamps' and Eric Kayser's.  Baguettes were coming out of the oven at Deschamps, but we opted for a couple of delicious quiches instead.


I know it may be heresy to say on a bread baking forum, but by far the highlight of the Paris portion of the trip was not the baked goods, but our first-time visit to the Palais Garnier.  Back on January 9, I spent between the hours of 12:45AM and 2:15AM 'standing in line' online waiting for tickets as they went on sale for the first time for the Robbins/Ek show titled 'Dances at a Gathering' and 'Appartement'.  It was well worth it as we got front row seats in the center of the second mezzanine. 

If you only have one night to spend in Paris, this is what I would recommend.  I particularly enjoyed the second half of the show which featured the Swedish band Fleshquartet playing live as a modern ballet was performed in front of them. Here's a link to a video of a portion of the show from a few years ago.  It was as good as it gets.

Finally our Big Adventure was capped off with a high-speed train ride to Amsterdam, a visit to the Van Gogh museum, and a personalized tour of the Keukenhof tulip gardens by fellow Fresh Loafian and BreadLab meister,  Freerk.  It was the perfect finale as we saw more colors and varieties than one could possibly imagine and thanks to Freerk, we actually got to and from the gardens without ending up in Belgium, Germany, or just in the water somewhere. 


 

And thus ends Sharon and Mark's Big Adventure of 2012.  Thanks to everyone who helped us feel the local flavor of their wonderful lands! 

-Mark
http://TheBackHomeBakery.com

 

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Reinhart's Pane Siciliano

Peter Reinhart's Pane Siciliano–or, as a friend calls it, Pan Sissy.

Here's the formula in BBGA format using Reinhart's original quantities as listed in the Bread Baker's Apprentice

(I'm still learning the BBGA format, so please let me know if you spot any errors.)

 

 

jamesjr54's picture
jamesjr54

Seeded Loaf

Top: The boule

Bottom: A sloppy turkey and jack w/mayo and dijon on seeded sourdough

Made a modified sourdough (with 1/8 tsp active dry yeast for timing) with toasted sesame, poppy and sunflower seeds. Came out great. Thanks to TFL'er Jay and the "The Basic Problem with my sourdough" thread contributors for guidance on my starter.

Formula

Levain:

102 g KAF AP

108 G water

43 g 100% hydration starter

5 g Rye

Fermented overnight (12 hrs minimum) at room temp.

Final dough:

417 g KAP AP

100 g Whole Wheat flour

310 g water

All of the levain (258 g)

1/8 tsp active dry yeast

13 g salt

20 g each sunflower, poppy and sesame seeds, toasted and cooled

Comes out to ~70% hydration, but feels wetter to me.

Mix all but salt, seeds and yeast. Autolyses 1 hr. Add salt, seeds (cooled) and yeast. Knead 10-12 minutes until moderately developed. Ferment 2-3 hours w/2 S&Fs.

Divide and preshape for 2 boules. Rest 20-25 minutes. Shape as boules. Proof for 90-120 minutes (watch the dough, not the clock ;-)).

Preheat oven 500F for 30 last 30 minutes of proof. 

Bake in cast iron covered dutch oven 20 mins covered; 20 minutes uncovered until 190F internal. (I use a parchment paper "sling" to load the dough, which I remove for the last 10 minutes.)

 

 

Keith Farwell's picture
Keith Farwell

Focaccia Crust Bubbling

I recently started making focaccia bread in our little shop, we make sandwich roll sized focaccia rolls fresh for the day and freeze the rest for the next day.

 

The thing is when the bread comes out the oven and cooling, you can see what i can only describe as veins along the top of bubble lines.  Fresh rolls dont suffer too badly as once they cool, soften up and are filled/sold on its not really noticeable however when we freeze these the veiny bubbles become brittle and fall off making the rolls look old and stale.

 

I am not sure if there is a common cause to this I would love to find out as we are starting to get some good responses about the rolls in general just some come out this way, this dosnt happen ALL the time so obviously it must be human error at play here in mixing or something.

 

Anyways if I can help with anymore information to solve this please ask

 

thanks

 

Seb43's picture
Seb43

Role of soaker and pre-ferment

After experimenting with a few recipes from the BBA, I'm wondering what is the role of preferments (such as the poolish i mostly use) and soaker.  The author frequently mention that they are meant to extract more flavor from the grains, but this seems a bit vague.  Here are some questions I've been asking myself lately and I would love to hear the opinions of more experienced (better educated!) bakers:

1) what type of flavor is extracted by a pre-ferment?  Are the natural microorganisms of the flour contributing to this flavor (thus explaining the use of very small amount of yeast)?

2) Is the goal of a soaker mostly to soften the bran and other "hard" part of grains?  Is it to give more time for the enzyme to produce some simple sugar from starch?  In some way, isn't any pre-ferment also a soaker?  Would it contribute any flavor if used on AP or bread flour?

3) What is the role of the flour that is added directly to the dough?  Wouldn't it make sense to use all the flour either as a soaker or preferment if this is positively contributing to flavor?  Would it be "too much"?

If some recipes call for both (sometime on the same type of flour, such as in the 100% whole wheat bread from BBA), then it suggests that they contribute different flavor profile.

varda's picture
varda

High Hydration Miche with Sifted Whole Wheat Flour

The other day I posted on preliminary miche attempts.   Due to problems with handling high hydration dough, the results were fairly disreputable.   The nice crumb did give me hope that I was on the right track.   Today I tried again, taking extra care not to fumble the dough.   While the dough throughout had the consistency of a water balloon I handled with care and got a better result.  This has a crispy crust and complex flavor which I don't really know how to describe, but it is definitely memorable.    It is made with 40% hand-sifted whole wheat flour, which I think I'm safe in describing as 90% extraction and the rest AP and Bread Flour.    For a simple formula - predominantly wheat - this bread achieves flavor that I usually can only coax out of multigrains and/or added ingredients.    I think it's all about the fermentation which is aided by the high hydration.  

I picked a difficult bread to try out a crescent moon score, but here it is:

Formula and method:

Starter

 

4:45 PM

9:15 PM

 

 

 

 

 

Seed

28

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

KAAP

15

 

120

135

 

 

 

 

KABF

 

47

 

47

 

 

 

 

Dark Rye

1

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

Whole Rye

 

3

5

8

5%

 

 

 

Water

12

34

145

191

100%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

382

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Final

Starter

Total

Percent

 

 

 

 

Hi Ex

303

 

303

41%

 

 

 

 

KAAP

150

96

246

33%

 

 

 

 

KABF

150

33

183

25%

 

 

 

 

Whole Rye

 

6

6

1%

 

 

 

 

Dark Rye

 

1

1

0%

 

 

 

 

Water

480

135

615

83%

 

 

 

 

Salt

14

 

14

1.9%

 

 

 

 

Starter

270

 

 

18%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1367

 

 

 

 

 

Starter factor

0.7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Leave starter overnight after second feed for 10 hours 45 minutes before using

Sift Whole Foods Whole Wheat flour to around 90% extraction

Autolyse flour and water for 45 minutes

Mix in salt and starter for 20 minutes at KA Speed 1, 20 minutes KA Speed 2

Dough should cohere into a loose ball by end of mix

Do a quick stretch and fold in bowl right after

BF for 3 hours

Stretch and fold in bowl

BF for 30 minutes

Stretch and fold on counter by pulling out in all directions flat (around 2.5 ft diameter)

and then folding into center

BF for 30 minutes

Remove from bowl and preshape into a loose ball

Rest 15 minutes

Shape into a ball by loosely turning corners into the center

Dough is very squashy like a water balloon

Place seam side up into a basket covered with tightly woven well-floured cotton cloth

Proof for 1 hour 40 minutes until dough starts to lose spring

Very gently turn dough onto peel with wheat bran under parchment paper

Slide onto stone

Bake with steam at 450F for 20 minutes, without steam for 35 minutes

Leave in oven for 5 minutes with door closed and heat off to finish

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Revising isand66's Bacon, Potato, Onion with Cheddar Sourdough Bread

Ian is well known for his interesting and delicious bread combinations.   I had taken his BPOC SD and made it into an even stranger bread by replacing his Semolina with 5% each; WW, Whole Rye and Whole Spelt.  For his bacon, cheese onion and potato I used; home made apple smoked pork jowl, ancient white vapor cheddar, caramelized onions and potato flakes.  The bread came out beautiful inside and out and was just plain delicious.  Definitely one of the 10 breads in my top 5 (actually it is one of the top 3).

I have been eating up all of the half a loaf, boule and batards that I froze after each bake over the last 3 months to see which ones I liked most and how best to rate and present them.  Being a sandwich king, I thought each might be presented as a nice lunch.  I was going to wait till I had finished them all (and have nearly done so), photo with the new old Nikon camera to do them justice this time, but, I had to break this one out separately since it is by far, far and away the best sandwich and lunch I have had these past few weeks.

Since this bread only deserves the best, the sandwich was a Dabrownman Super Special - Curried Grilled Chicken with Mango Chutney.  The sides were cold Rosemary, Pecorino, Parmesan,White Polenta, home grown Field Greens, Meculin and Lettuce Salad, home made Kosher Dill, Bread and Butter with Serrano Pepper pickles and a home grown navel orange.  The curry, chutney and polenta recipes follow the pix's as a bonus for all lunch lovers on TFL.

The first pix is a mis en place recipe for the Grilled Chicken Curry.  It has about 2 T each starting from the far right diced small; celery, green onion, red onion, grilled Italian squash and eggplant, carrot, red pepper, poblano pepper,  each orange mango chutney and mayo,  1/2 tsp Madras Curry powder, 1/2 grilled chicken breast,  1 T each; dried apricot, cranberry and raisin (reconstituted with hot water.) Mix it all up and you are finally done with this fine sandwich's filling.

Rosemary White Polenta with Parmesan and Pecorino

1/4 C medium grain white corn meal

1/4 C white corn flour (ground from WCM above)

1 C milk - any kind

1 C chicken stock - I use home made

1 T butter

1 T fresh rosemary chopped fine

1/2 C Pecorino and Parmesan grated cheese blend

pepper

Bring milk and stock to a simmer and slowly add the corn meal and corn flour while whisking constantly.  When the mixture thickens to a thick porridge, stir in butter, rosemary.  Turn off the heat and add the cheese.  Pepper to taste.  Serve warm for dinner but it is much better the next day cold for lunch.

Orange Mango Chutney

 In large fry pan sauté:

 1 T oil

½ T fresh ginger and 2 cloves minced garlic

 Sauté until fragrant about 1 min and add:

1 C brown, white or red onion, Sauté until soft about 3-5 min Add:

 1 C red bell pepper

1 T minced hot chili (jalapeno, Serrano, Thai)

1 ½ tsp Madras curry powder, curry powder or hot curry powder

½ tsp Gharam Masala

¼ tsp salt

¼ tsp each cayenne powder and red pepper flakes

1/8 tsp each; allspice, nutmeg, clove, cinnamon

 Sauté for 1 minute until spices are fragrant then add:

 2 C diced mangos

½ C apple cider vinegar

½ C brown sugar

Zest of 1 orange - Supreme the orange and add the segments with the juice of membrane

1 diced pealed and cored small apple (can use pineapple and juice instead)

¼ C raisins

½ cups Macadamia nuts (optional)

 Simmer until the chutney thickens to jam about 20-30 min.  Place hot in sterilized jar and put into refrigerator when cooled.  It also freezes well in small portions which is what I do.

 You can chutney just about anything but you may want to use lemon zest, segments and juice depending on your choice of fruit or vegetable being made into chutney.

 

wassisname's picture
wassisname

Schnaitsee Rye

This bread is based on a recipe simply titled Roggenbrot (rye bread) from a cookbook called "Was kocht ma Guats in Schnaitsee".  I can't come up with an English translation for this phrase that has quite the same ring to it as the original Bavarian, but the gist is, "Good things we’re cooking in Schnaitsee."  The entire book is handwritten, accompanied by sketched artwork and favorite food-related sayings of the various recipe authors.   

The highlight of the too short bread chapter is this rye.  Based on how the recipe is written it's pretty clear that the author has made this bread many, many times.  The details that are missing are the same one's I might leave out if I was to write up one of my regular breads.  Even with a few blanks to fill in I felt I was in good hands.  The recipe features a two stage sourdough build, a bake at receding temperatures, and a reminder to have a bowl of water handy during kneading.  I like where this baker is coming from. 

With a lot of help from Mom, I got the recipe translated into a formula.  The first problem was the hydration.  It came out at 51%.  I checked the math again and again, but that’s how it came out.  I had to assume that something was lost in translation so I bumped it up to 70%. 

Next was the problem of sheer size – about 5.2 kg divided into two loaves.  I scaled it down to a single, still really large, loaf of around 2.3 kg.

I made two changes to suit my taste:  I left out the yeast, and substituted freshly ground coriander for the packaged breadspice called for in the original.

Otherwise, the formula that follows is as close as I could get to the original.

The result is a flavorful loaf with a sturdy crust and soft, fragrant crumb.  Very nice!  

Marcus

Dean_01's picture
Dean_01

Irish Soda Bread

Here is a picture of my irish soda bread, i have made quite a few of these with variable results....plenty of fails more so due to using other things than buttermilk.

This one was made using my own buttermilk (one which ford mentioned to do, where as you start with buttermilk and upkeep your own supply using milk and gelatine, which worked brilliantly thanks ford.).  This is the best one i have made, and the quickest one i put together and got into the oven. it was cooked using my dutch oven type dish (cast iron).

 

just if your wondering on the bread bin thats chocolate as i had just created a batch of chocolate cakes haha.

 

Dean.

 

varda's picture
varda

Borodinsky, Borodinsky, and Miche

Other people's obsessions can be dull.   That's what the back button, the scroll button and the  block this user button are for.    But if you'll bear with me I have more to say about Borodinsky.    First, misunderstanding a suggestion by eliabel, I searched high and low and found a Russian grocery in Allston, MA which carries Kvas.   So I made the trek over there, and discovered that they also carried Borodinsky.    I bought a loaf, prepared in a sliced sandwich bread format, thinking how good could this be?    The answer - extremely good, extremely fresh, extremely coriandery.   I consider myself corrected.   Then it turns out that eliabel was not suggesting that I buy bottled Kvas, but instead Kvas concentrate.   But I had my Kvas, and by golly (remember, this is a well-mannered site) I was going to use it.  

The Big Sky Borodinsky

The Kvas - It tasted like bread.

Borodinsky with Kvas

Again I followed Andy's Feb 6, 2012 post, but with enough deviations that it warrants specifying formula and method directly.

Rye Sour

 

2:00 PM

9:00 PM

 

 

 

Seed

50

 

 

 

 

 

Dark Rye

12

 

 

12

 

 

Whole Rye

15

75

125

215

 

 

Water

23

147

208

378

167%

 

 

 

 

 

605

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Scald

 

 

 

 

 

 

Whole Rye

104

 

 

 

 

 

Malted Rye

 

 

 

 

 

 

Molasses

41

 

 

 

 

 

Boiling Kvas

272

 

 

 

 

 

Ground coriander

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

420

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sponge

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rye Sour

552

 

 

 

 

 

Scald

420

 

 

 

 

 

 

972

 

 

 

 

 

Final dough

 

 

 

 

 

 

Whole Rye

207

 

 

 

 

 

KA Bread Flour

138

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

10

 

 

 

 

 

Sponge

972

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Final

Sour

Scald

Total

Percent

 

Whole Rye

207

196

104

506

 

 

Dark Rye

 

11

 

11

 

 

KA Bread Flour

138

 

 

138

21%

 

Water

 

345

 

345

94%

 

Kvas

 

 

272

272

 

 

Malt

 

 

0

0

 

 

Molasses

 

 

41

41

 

 

Salt

10

 

 

10

 

 

Coriander

 

 

 

3

 

 

Sponge

972

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

552

420

1327

 

 

Sour factor

0.91

 

 

 

 

 

Feed starter as above

At second feeding, make the scald

Leave overnight (15 minutes short of 10 hours)

Mix scald and starter

Ferment for just over 4 hours

Add final ingredients - mix by hand until blended

Ferment for 1 hour

Note that paste was very fluffy and aerated at this point

Spoon into greased bread pan.   Smooth down with wet spatula

Spray top with water and do so at intervals (Mini's suggestion)

Using spatula, separate top edge of bread from pan (Mini's suggestion)

Cover with Pullman top

Proof for 2 hours 5 minutes

Note -Very bubbly and starting to get holey on top

Oven preheated to 550F for 1 hour - steam pan for last 30 minutes of preheat

Put bread in oven and bring temperature back to 550  (Note I was too worried to cover it for first 15 minutes since it had risen so much during proof - I could have though)

Then reduce to 350F

Bake for 1 hour 15 min (without top for first 15 minutes with top for an hour)

then remove steam pan, remove bread from pan and bake for 30 minutes

Note that uncooked dough weight was 1275 so lost 52g in between steps

Tastewise, and despite the fact that I used canned Kvas rather than roasted rye malt, this was the best yet.   Absolutely delicious, with sort of a tart, tangy taste overlaid on the (freshly ground) coriander, malt, and molasses.   Addictively delicious.   Watch out.  

 

As for the miche, I have been wanting to follow David's SFBI miche for awhile now, but lacked what I thought was a suitable flour.   When push came to shove, though, my thinking and flour had deviated too much, so I'll just say that I was inspired by David's miches.

First the flour:  I don't seem to be able to find high extraction flour around here, short of milling it myself.   So I decided to sift.   My first try was unsuccessful and essentially I had whole wheat flour.   So I decided to buy a better sieve.  

That made a big difference.   For this miche, I started with 360g of whole wheat flour, generated 30g of bran, and 30g went missing.   So I can't calculate the extraction but it looked good.   Then I followed David in using only half high extraction.   In my case, I used KA Bread Flour as the other half.   

But before I could get to actually making a SFBI miche, I had to pursue a different line of thought.  I was somewhat startled the other day, when I made a Pain Au Levain with no Stretch and Fold whatsoever.   I am totally imprinted on Hamelman - he says Stretch and Fold, so I Stretch and Fold.    But my curiousity was piqued.     This time I decided to make up a very wet dough and develop it in the mixer for as long as it took and then again no Stretch and Fold.    So I made up an 83% hydration dough and mixed it in my humble Kitchen Aid - first at speed 1 for 35 minutes, and then at speed 2 for 10 minutes, with plenty of scrape downs along the way.   The dough came together quite nicely and strongly at the 45 minute mark.    Then I let it bulk ferment without touching it for  3.5 hours, and continued on my way.

Given the hazards of working with such wet dough, then I stumbled.   I proofed in a big ceramic bowl dusted with flour, but it was too big, so I had to basically drop the dough out of it onto the peel.   This compressed the bottom of the loaf a bit.   Worse yet, it snagged on the peel when I "slid" it into the oven.   To heck with the shape.   Despite all that, I think the crumb came out very nicely.   Undoubtedly it would have been quite different had I done a shorter mix, and a few stretch and folds.    But I kind of like this result.  

 

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