The Fresh Loaf

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mickybean's picture
mickybean

Brooklyn-by-way-of-Norwich Sourdough

About two months after baking my first-ever loaf of bread, I'm posting my first blog entry here. From raising my own sourdough starter to learning to handle ever wetter and slacker doughs, it's been a fun and action-packed couple of months. I've been edified and consoled many a time by this site, and I'm finally feeling confident enough to say hello.

At the moment, I have two major challenges. The first is learning to work with my cane banneton, which only seems to want to release my loaves 50 percent of the time. (The other 50 percent of the time, I am forced to tug at the dough until the loaf comes out warped.) I've read that some people use rice flour and others use semolina, but I haven't yet found time to experiment.

My other big struggle is my sourdough starter's newfound rye addiction, which I can't get it to kick. I originally started it on whole wheat flour before converting it to white, and all was going smoothly until I refrigerated it. When I tried to bring it back to life a week later, I found it sluggish and unresponsive. Well, a friend suggested I revitalize it with some whole rye flour, which worked like a charm (instead of doubling like it used to, the starter now nearly triples in 4-5 hours), but ever since it's tasted rye paradise, it doesn't want to go back. I keep trying to gradually wean it off rye, which seems to work, but the moment I cut it off cold-turkey, it goes on strike and stays that way for multiple feedings. I'm interested in solving this problem, of course, but also in understanding--if anyone has an explanation--why rye is so much more conducive to yeastly activity.

This past month I've been exclusively practicing variations on this Norwich Sourdough. I want to get all my basic techniques down before I branch out and play around. Still, I've made a few adjustments (halving the quantities and upping the hydration), and this is my current default formula (which produced both the loaves pictured in this post, the first one being my most recent effort):

510g white flour (I use about half AP, half bread flour)
350g water at about 74F
180g mature 100% hydration whole rye sourdough starter
12g salt

Mix/autolyse: 35 minutes
First fermentation: 2.5 hours, s&f every 30 minutes
Proof: 2.5 hours, retard overnight
Bake: 35 minutes at 475F on preheated baking steel

The original recipe calls for whole rye flour, which I don't add since it's already in the starter. I am quite happy with the flavor (the sourness is quite pronounced) and the crumb that I achieve with this method, but would prefer to get my starter back to an all-white state so that it's more versatile.

tssaweber's picture
tssaweber

Big Holes

 

If you know how to handle wet dough (80%) and with the right flour, big holes are a breeze!!!

 

 

 

Happy baking

 

Thomas

www.campingchicago.com

Stevo's picture
Stevo

Poor rise - ?yeast killers

Just tried a sourdough with 50% seeded organic white and 50% organic wholemeal - this has worked well for me before. However this time in a fit of adventure, I added 50g pine nuts, 50g grated parmesan, a handful fo fresh basil and 2 cloves of garlic. It barely rose. Will any of these ingredients affect the rise - I'm guessing the parmesan may?

bobku's picture
bobku

Poolish

If I make a 100% hyd poolish using 1/2 of the flour from a recipe adding .02% yeast bakers percentage and ferment overnight, is it necessary to add any additional yeast from the recipe. I'm thinking I can just use the poolish which has yeast already and just complete recipe with no additional yeast. My bulk rise and proof might be longer but I think the flavor and final crumb wold benefit. Is this correct ?

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

107% Whole Grain 8 Grain Sourdough

Lucy finally got back to her bread and butter with a high percent whole grain multi-grain bread.   It has been a while but this one may prove she hasn’t lost her touch - if she ever had one.

 

I'm always amazed how much the acid in the levain leaches out the color becoming almost white compared to the autolyse which has exactly the same grain in the same proportions at nearly the same hydration..

 The whole grains were a mix of rye, spelt, buckwheat, oat, farro, wheat, Kamut and barley with a hydration of 95%.  The add ins were red and white malt, honey, Toadies, almond meal and VWG.  The non aromatic seeds included: sesame, flax, poppy and chia.  The aromatic seeds included: fennel, anise, caraway and coriander.

 

The levain was built our usual 3 stage way using our 66% hydration rye starter that has been refrigerated weeks.   The levain doubled after the 2nd 4 hour build but we  only did a 16 hour retard after the levain had risen 25% after the 3rd feeding.

 

When we got the levain out of the fridge the next day to finish its 3rd stage doubling, we started the 3 hour autolyse of the dough flour and water, (including all the add ns except the aromatic seeds) with the salt sprinkled on top so we didn’t forget it.

 

Once the levain was mixed into the autolyse we did 3 sets of slap and folds of 7, 2 and 1 minute on 20 minute intervals followed by 3 sets of stretch and folds, stretching from the 4 cardinal compass points, on 20 minute intervals where the aromatic seeds were added on the first set.

 

Once the S&F’s were done we immediately pre-shaped and then shaped the dough into a boule and placed it into a rice floured basket, bagged it and placed it in the fridge for a 10 hour retard.   This is about 2 hours less than put normal retard but after last weeks over proof we would try to under proof this one and bake it right out of the fridge.

 

We fired up Big Old Betsy to 550 F regular bake and put the Mega Steam Apparatus on the bottom rack when BOB hit 525 F.  When she got to 550 F 15 minutes later the steam was billowing and the stones were at 525 F.

 

How did that apple Crisp get in there?

We upended the basket onto parchment paper and a peel, slashed it quickly and slid it on the bottom stone with another stone above for 15 minutes if steam .As soon as the oven door closed we turned the oven down to 500 F and 3 minutes later down to 475 F.

 

This fine tasting bread made for a fine lunch.

At he 15 minute mark, the steam came out and the oven was turned down to convection 425 F and baked another 25 minutes until the bread read 203 F when the oven was shut off.  When the bread read 205 F we took it out and put it n the rack too cool. 

 

The bread browned well and had tiny blisters but didn’t spring or bloom much.   I think it was just too cold coming straight out of the fridge.   At the 25 minute mark, it only read 135 F about 35 F lower than normal.  Maybe it was the whole grains and high hydration that kept the dough cooler than normal and stopped the spring from really getting started.

 

Few things taste better than home grown cherry tomato bruschetta on toasted SD white bread.

We will see what the crumb looks like for lunch but it sure smalls great cooling in the rack.  The wait for lunch is over and the crumb came out soft, moist and fairly open for a 107% whole grain bread, but it is the taste that really stands out and why we love these breads so much.  The deep color of the crust and crumb is due mostly to the whole grains and honey as is the flavor.   The add ins on the flavor side really stand out and make this bread exceptional.

And don't forget that healthy and tasty salad!

Formula

SD Starter

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

RyeSD Starter

10

0

0

10

1.85%

Whole Rye

1

2

3

6

1.29%

Whole Kamut

2

3

10

15

3.22%

Whole Buckwheat, Oat, Farro

1

2

4

7

1.50%

Whole Wheat

2

5

8

15

3.22%

Whole Barley

2

4

9

15

3.22%

Whole Spelt

1

2

3

6

1.29%

Water

10

20

40

70

15.02%

Total

30

40

80

150

32.19%

 

 

 

 

 

 

SD Levain Totals

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

75

16.09%

 

 

 

Water

75

16.09%

 

 

 

Hydration

100.00%

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

12.40%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

Mixed Whole Grain

466

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

8

1.72%

 

 

 

Water

450

96.57%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

96.57%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

541

 

 

 

 

Water

525

 

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration wih Starter

97.04%

 

 

 

 

Whole Grain %

107.02%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

95.20%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

1,210

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

 

Red Rye Malt

3

0.64%

 

 

 

White Rye Malt

3

0.64%

 

 

 

VW Gluten

15

3.22%

 

 

 

Poppy, Sesame, Chia & Flax

50

10.73%

 

 

 

Almond Meal

15

3.22%

 

 

 

Toadies

15

3.22%

 

 

 

Aromatic  Seeds

15

3.22%

 

 

 

Honey

20

4.29%

 

 

 

Total

136

29.18%

 

 

 

 

LevaiNation's picture
LevaiNation

Whole Wheat and Einkorn Biga Boules

This weekend I went ahead and made some Einkorn loaves by adjusting K. Forkish's 50% WW Biga bread recipe. The results were fan-tas-tico! 

My first Einkorn loaf using 100% of this ancient grain turned out very nice, yet a little dense with not so much rise. I'm gonna work my way back to that loaf and try to perfect it, but first I wanted to play around with different blends.

For this attempt I started a Biga at 6pm using 500g of white flour, 340g H2O and 1/8 tsp Yeast. Left it overnight on the kitchen counter at a temperature of around 70f. By 8am, it was bubbly and gassy and ready for more. I then added 250g Whole Wheat and 250g Einkorn, plus 3/4 tsp yeast and 22g salt. Did 3 folds in the first hour and by 10:30 AM it was ready to shape and proof. The loaves stayed in the baskets for 1 hour at room temp and 30 minutes in the fridge. Then I baked in D.O's @ 475f. 30 min with lid, 20 minutes no lid.

Voila. Gorgeous, light and golden. It still eats well three days later. Looove that sweet taste of the Einkorn. Next attempt I'm gonna try for 50% Einkorn...

 

Peace Y'all, 

Bryan

TylerDavis's picture
TylerDavis

how to get a thinner crust?

I am following the methods and recipes in Ken Forkish's Flour Water Salt Yeast book.  With the exception of hydration, which I always have to increase (dry flour in Arizona?)

The ceramic dutch oven is giving a great crackly crust that I could never achieve with oven-generated steam.  However the thickness and chewiness of the crust is more than I would like.  You really have to tear at it to get a bite.  The crumb structure is mostly fine.  So is there anything I can adjust - time, temperature, hydration, that will still give me the crackly blistered crust, but in a thinner form?

chris319's picture
chris319

Oven Energy Consumption

Sivvy's picture
Sivvy

Discarded Sourdough: A Rookie Question

I just started my second ever sourdough starter a couple hours ago. I'm very much a rookie to all of this.

My question regards discarded sourdough starter. Let us say I remove a cup of sourdough to discard each time I feed the starter. I have seen various recipes for things you can make with that discarded starter, because it is a perfectly good ingredient; however, I have been wondering if there is an even smaller, more "individual," use for it.

What I am getting at is this: I don't want to bake a loaf of bread, or a dozen biscuits, or so on, every time I discard a cup of starter. Can I actually make something with the cup of starter alone, and a few basic ingredients? Can I create a smaller pastry or baked item with that one cup of starter? If so, what would you folks suggest?

Thanks folks! :-)

Hiscook's picture
Hiscook

Combining Tang Zhong method with Artisan Bread in 5 Min

Have anyone tried combining Tang Zhong method with Artisan Bread in 5 Min? I like the crusty outer layer of artisan, but hope that the crumb is softer....and last over the next 2 or 3 days. The bread I baked using the Artisan Bread in 5 min is too chewy for me and by the next day, it become to hard...it is only good for one day..

 

 

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