The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

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richkaimd's picture
richkaimd

Does anyone have a baker's formula for a challah which uses whole eggs?

I'm expected to make 50 challahs in a couple of weeks.  Does anyone have a formula which uses whole eggs instead of only yolks?  The recipe I've preferred to use in the past does not use weights or percentages.  It assumes that the baker's going to make 3X1.5lb loaves.

CaptainBatard's picture
CaptainBatard

Auvergne Crown

The Auvergne Crown or Couronne shaped loaf, typically made from yeasted white bread dough, can be seen in almost every boulangerie throughout France. When I go to my local boulangerie it is displayed on the rack in the typical round shape along with an epi cut. What separates this Auvergne Crown from all the others is the use of the traditional firm French sourdough, levain, and a long slow rise that gives the wheat time to develop its full potential.  Although this is a simple white dough, this thick crusted bread has an unexpected flavor and quality.  I found the best way to eat this is to just tear off a piece…it exposes a crumb that is riddled with many different sized holes....

To read the full post come and visit Weekendloafer.com 

kiki's picture
kiki

Sweet Potato Roles

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Brod & Taylor Folding Proofer - Fantastic Customer Service

I wanted to let everyone know about the fantastic customer service I have received from 'Brod & Taylor Folding Proofer' Company and CEO.  

Recently on my blog I posted about my new proofer.  It had stopped heating.

Before, I even had a chance to contact the company.  On a Sunday, Mr. Michael Taylor, contacted me and assured me how he stood by his product 110% and, was very concerned about why my proofer was not heating.  

He has been constant touch with me and I couldn't be more satisfied with the support.  

'Everything' was completely taken care of and, without me leaving my house.  This all happened on the weekend.  Today is Tuesday and I'm using my New Proofer, right now.  It's warming up and making bubbles in my very content Biga,  for some bread baking.

Michael Taylor has been using his for about 4 years now and tells how his sons love the yogurt it makes...I can't wait to make some large jars of yogurt! 

Sylvia

 

Truth Serum's picture
Truth Serum

Creating a dry mix for a single 9" by 5" loaf

I would like to assemble a dry ingredient mixture of flours, salt, sugar and dry milk with a separate yeast packet to give for holiday gifts. I know this is a bit goofy but I think I can make it work. The idea is that the recipient proofs the yeast in a small amount of water, and then adds more water, oil and the mix. 

I am wondering if any Fresh Loafers have experience with this.

 

abovethelau's picture
abovethelau

Help! My bread is too flat!

Hi Everyone,

I was hoping someone would be able to help me with a constant problem I have been having.  I am relatively new to baking bread (I have been baking breads for about 6 to 8 months) but have always had success with every bread I have tried, whether artisan or simple, to a point.  The problem I keep running into is really wide bread.

Let me explain: Every time I make a round loaf my bread gets wider instead of getting taller (it gets tall to a degree but i still end up with a larger shorter round) causing my slices to be about 8 inches long but only an inch and a half or so tall.  Is there a way to avoid this and get more of a fully round loaf?  Do I need to use a mold in order to achieve this? I thought that I would be able to get a round free form, but it hasn't been working so far.  Is it possible that my bread is just too slack? I think its possible that the dough is too slack but it seems odd that it would happen to all my different types of bread and recipes I've used.

I currently have a poolish sitting out and would like to make some bread when I get home, so any tips would be greatly appreciated!!

Thanks for any help you can give!

- Laura

cranbo's picture
cranbo

Opinion on a few flours?

So I've made a connection thru a local restaurant that should help me get access to bulk flours. I'm definitely going to buy 1 50lb bag of GM Harvest King Flour, but I'm interested on any opinions on the following flours:

  • Giusto All Purpose Enriched Unbleached Flour
  • Pendleton Power high-gluten
  • GM Rye Flour

Any feedback appreciated, thanks in advance folks. 

flournwater's picture
flournwater

Hadn't See It Before ... Looks Like It'd Be Awesome

Perhaps this has been around for a long time, but I hadn't seen this before and when I looked at it I saw the perfect vessel for artisan breads.  Deep covered cast iron pan or shallow cast iron pan with domed lid.

http://www.amazon.com/Lodge-LCC3-Logic-Pre-Seasoned-Cooker/dp/B0009JKG9M/ref=pd_rhf_ee_shvl28

kab's picture
kab

Yeast Rolls

My Great grandmother and great aunt made the BEST yeast rolls. My father got the recipe from them (or as best as they could guess because they did it by look on everything). The directions do not look right, can you please let me know if this sounds correct.

Ingredients
3 packs dry yeast dissolved in 1/2 cup warm water
5 cups self rising flour (unsifted)
1/4 cup sugar<br>1 teaspoon baking soda
1 cup shortening
2 cups lukewarm buttermilk

Directions
Dissolve yeast and set aside
Mix flour, sugar and baking soda together in a bowl cut in shortening
Add buttermilk and yeast. Mix Well.
Place desired amount of dough on cloth and roll out. Cut using a cookie cutter or shape into rolls.
Preheat oven to 350 while dough comes to room temperature.
Bake 15-20 minutes.

 

Does this sound correct? I don't want to try to make them without good instructions

ActiveSparkles's picture
ActiveSparkles

Milk in bread making

Hi guys. I am looking to start using milk in bread making, just as an alternative.

Just wondering about the benefits (if any) and drawbacks (if any)

Also do you replace all the water with milk, or parts of both?
Know it would vary from recipe to recipe, but for basic bread is what I am looking at using it in.

Thanks,

Charlie

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