The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

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AKBread's picture
AKBread

Welbilt Convection Bread Machine

Hi, I am new here and hoping for some advice!  I recently found a Welbilt Convection Bread Machine ABM-7500 at a thrift store in like-new condition for really cheap.  But it didn't have the user manual.  Tons of web searching hasn't given any results, unfortunately.

Barring locating a copy of the manual online, does anyone have any advice or experience in using a convection bread maker?  I've never had one before (nor have I had a convection oven) so I don't even know where to start.  Does anyone have this machine or have any experience with it at all?

Thank you for your time! :)

chimilio's picture
chimilio

Coconuts buns

Ingredients:


2 pounds all-purpose flour.


1 packet of baking powder


2 tablespoons roughly.


1 can coconut milk.


2 cups warm water.


4 tablespoons butter.


4 teaspoons sugar.


4 tablespoons of salt.


step by step


Sift dry ingredients, place in a bolw add the coconut milk and then continue kneading with the remaining ingredients, cover with plastic wrap or a damp cloth and let stand until doubled in volume this should make for a warm place free air flows. Once the volume has doubled, punch the dough to remove the gas and knead again to make small balls, place on a greased plate, separated from one another since their volume is doubled, let stand with a canvas cover until they have grown precanlentado baking in an oven at 370 F and bake for about 45 min. Note, you may need more or less flour and / or warm water during the preparation of the recipe.

chrisg's picture
chrisg

How Awesome is Pizza!?!

My son wants pizza.  I can't say no to him. He is so flippin' cute. He also thinks my pizza is better than anything from a pizza place. So, I can't say no. Plus it gives me a good reason to make some dough.  This recipe comes from the America's Test Kitchen Family Cookbook.  The recipe is at the end, if you want to try it. I spent lots of time testing recipe after recipe and found that this one makes a nice, stretchy dough.  I tweeked it a bit.


 


Ready to Rise


I tried something new with this batch of dough. I let the machine go for 5 minutes, then let it rest for 5, then turned the machine on for 5 more minutes. I have to say it came out nice and silky.


First Rise


After about 45 minutes on the counter, I shoved it in the fridge for about 1 more hour.  I did this because I had to run an errand.  Pizza dough is forgiving, so no worries.  The most amazing thing happened, the dough became super elastic.  I stretched one so thin, I think it only had one side. THIN CRUST HERE I COME!


Balls


They are like pretty little maids in a row.  I let them rest on the counter to warm up.  Cold dough is hard to stretch.   My wife likes her pizza thick, I am kind of a purest when it comes to pizza. I prefer napolitian style pizza, so I have a happy medium that even the kids love.


Rolled out


I found that if I don't run the docking wheel over it I get ginormous bubbles and everything slides off.  That looks cool, but my stone and oven become a big ol' mess.  Topped


I just top it with a quick and simple pizza sauce and some mozzerella/provolone mix  - Into the oven with you!


This goes in...


Ready to Cook


 


 


 


 


This comes out!


DONE!


I love pizza!


 


Basic Pizza Dough (from America's Test Kitchen)


4  1/2 c. bread flour


1 envelope yeast


1  1/2 t. salt


2 T. olive oil - (the better the oil, the better the flavor of the crust.)


1  3/4 c. warm water (I use bottled water. I don't know if that makes any difference, Ask a New Yorker.)


It's all dump and go from here. Try out the 5-5-5 method for yourself (it's in the blog.) don't forget to stick it in the fridge for at least an hour.  I plan on trying it over night to see what happens.  I will update if it is good.


 

Franko's picture
Franko

Country Style Rye Bread with a Mixed Grain Soaker and Levain


The loaf in the photo above is from a formula of my own that I've been playing around with for weeks now, trying to get a result I could live with. Finally after several previous unsatisfactory bakes, this latest attempt produced something close to the loaf I've been trying for from the beginning. The bread is a Country Style Rye with a mixed grain soaker and a levain, so nothing that hasn't been done before in many ways over many years by other bakers. Last week I made the dough and baked it in the Dutch Oven, and although it tasted fine I wasn't thrilled with the appearance. Photo below of last weeks effort.



The scoring was poor and it spread too much from what I believe was a combination of too long a final rise and too much initial steam generated from baking in the DO. That's my best analysis at any rate. The other problem was the formulation itself, which needed multiple tweaks to bump up the overall flavour, as well as the percentage of levain, which I'd originally had far too low . With the help of a spreadsheet I'd managed to put together a few weeks prior, adjusting the formulation was a quick and easy process compared to doing it the old way. More about the spreadsheet further down.


This latest bake went fairly well compared to the last, getting a good even jump in the oven, with the slashing opening up nicely minus any unsightly splitting or tearing. The colour is a bit darker than I'd prefer but with the high hydration of this loaf I thought it best to bake it as boldly as possible. The crumb is moist, dense, and flavourful, having what I'd call a medium sour tang to it. It's certainly a work in progress but it's getting there somewhat.



 



Making a bread formulation spreadsheet was something I'd promised myself to take a stab at sometime this year, having seen what a useful calculator they can be for adjusting formulae or quantities quickly and accurately, from using a few that my friend breadsong,http://www.thefreshloaf.com/user/breadsong had sent me late last year to try out. Being a complete newbie to this sort thing, it was a bit of a tough go in the beginning, but fortunately I had lots of expert guidance from breadsong while I plodded my way up the learning curve of making this spreadsheet . I can't thank her enough for all the tips and guidance she shared so generously with me throughout this project. This is just a very simple spreadsheet that calculates a desired final dough weight based on percentages. It's been formatted to look as close to a typical recipe layout as possible so that people who are unfamiliar with using a spreadsheet will hopefully find it easy to use. For anyone wanting something with a lot more functions and input, this one of mine will disappoint, but here's a link to Dolph's sheet that looks like it will do just about anything you could want.


http://www.starreveld.com/Baking/index.html .


Another one you might try is from joshuacronemeyer's recent post of his nifty Dough Hydration Calculator.


 http://joshuacronemeyer.github.com/Flour-and-Water/


For those who'd like to try out this one of mine, the sheet for the formula as well as the procedure are available through links at the bottom of this post. Please note that the spreadsheet file is only available by downloading it from the links provided. No email requests please. The links will take you to a Google Docs page that shows the spreadsheet with the recipe. You can use the recipe as is from the G Docs page or you can download your own copy of the file in either Excel or Open Office by clicking on 'File' , 'Download as', then select a file format (for most people it will be Excel) and it will download a functioning copy of the spreadsheet . Now it can be used by inputting your own desired dough weight in the yellow shaded cell, or change any of the numbers in the green shaded cells of the percentage column to suit your preference. The format can be saved as a template and used for other formulas as well.


Best Wishes,


Franko


Below are links to the sheet and the procedure


https://spreadsheets.google.com/ccc?key=0AjicIp92YPCTdHRDZTJmTm4zamxPM3JZWmJYVUZ0WVE&hl=en&authkey=CMDqqDM


 


https://docs.google.com/document/d/1SlOG7r_cdHlHEn0YwB0GgwhaCGSIgpjyPqpiDmu56Eo/edit?hl=en&authkey=CL2S_bEO#


 


 


 


 


 

varda's picture
varda

Pain Au Levain - can't steam the oven too much

A recent blog post made me sit up and take notice.   http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/22954/getting-grigne-observation shows two loaves; one made with steam at the beginning of the bake, the second steamed later in the process.   The first one looks better by a lot.   Lately I've been making batards with two cuts.   The most frequent outcome is that one of the cuts opens nicely and takes most of the bloom of the loaf, and the second opens a bit, and then seals over.   In trying to diagnose this I thought it might be either a shaping or a steaming issue.    So I changed my batard shaping so that instead of rolling toward me (a la Ciril Hitz) I roll away (a la Mark from the Back Home Bakery).   The latter method seems to allow me to get a tighter gluten sheath so I'm sticking with it.   However, it didn't seem to solve the problem.   Yesterday, I decided to see if more steam at the beginning of the bake would help.   I made a pain au levain (almost the same as Hamelman p. 158 but with higher hydration 69% vs 65%, higher percentage of prefermented flour 17% vs 15% and a lot less salt.)   The only change I made to my regular baking process was to add a dry broiler pan underneath the stone during preheat, and fill it with water at the same time as loading the loaves.   This is in addition to my usual loaf pans filled with water and wet towels which I place on each side of the stone.  Here is the result:


 



Not a perfect loaf by any means, but the first time in recent memory where my cuts opened evenly.   Should I attribute this to the extra steaming at the beginning of the bake?  I think so.


 

copyu's picture
copyu

Graham flour pie crust

Just curious...has anyone ever tried to make a pie crust using a good proportion of Graham flour? I'm well-aware of the millions of recipes for making pie-crusts using "Graham crackers", but here in Japan, that's really a major expense. Making my own Graham crackers, first, would be many times cheaper than buying them, but that's going to take so much time that the over-priced crackers (over US $8:00 per box!) might be a bargain, if they were readily available...


I tried a google "advanced search" for graham flour pie crusts with "graham cracker" excluded and, on the entire English-language part of the internet, there were no results...


Can anyone steer me to the right information, or do I have to invent this recipe for myself?


Any insights would be much appreciated!


Cheers,


copyu

breadmantalking's picture
breadmantalking

My version of Reinhart's Oreganato Herb Bread



 


There are, of course many variations of the perfect sandwich loaf. Probably every bread-baking culture has its version. And probably a lot depends on the kind of sandwiches the people of the culture like to eat. So, for instance, Jewish sandwich bread, at least those breads from Eastern Europe, tend to be heavy on the rye flour, sometimes with caraway and always smothered with something like corned beef and onions. In France the perfect sandwich bread is a baguette-like roll called 'pain ordinaire', or ordinary bread. This is no ordinary bread, however. It is typically loaded up with a good hard, sharp cheese and washed down with strong coffee. 


 


This bread is Italian in origin, at least from its herb content, but the style is definitely French. A hybrid of sorts. The original contained some coarsely ground black pepper, which I have omitted since I know my customers. Personally I like food with a little heat, but my house mates.... not so much. Anyway, this bread, because of the added herbs and spices is great for sharp cheeses, or pickled or cured meats (cold cuts, corned beef, sausage) and even crispy veggies. Or a combination. It has a fairly close crumb, which could be more open if you leave to rise a little longer. The crust is only a little chewy. But I actually like it the way it is, since the density helps hold the contents of the sandwich. Enjoy!!


 


Here's What You'll Need:


4 cups AP flour


3/8 cup uncooked corn meal (coarse - polenta)


2 tsp. granulated garlic


3 tsp. dried parsley


3 tsp. dried oregano


3/4 Tbs. yeast


2 tsp. salt


about 1 1/2 cups warm water


 


Here's What You'll Need To Do:


1. Mix all the dry ingredients, including the herbs and the yeast together and mix thoroughly.



 


2. Add the water mixing as you pour it to form a rough dough.


 


3. Knead this mixture on a lightly-floured tabletop for about 10 minutes until it becomes quite smooth. It will be a little tacky, but smooth, and not at all sticky. Adjust the flour and/or water as needed to get the right texture.



 


4. Place the kneaded dough into a lightly-oiled bowl, turn to coat, then cover and let it rise in a warm place until doubled. This will take 1 1/2 to 2 hours. You may stretch and fold the dough halfway through if desired to develop the gluten more fully.


 


5. Form into a loaf shape and place into a prepared loaf pan. Let the dough rise again until it is about 1 inch (2 1/2 cm) above the lip of the pan.



 


6. Bake in a preheated oven at 350 F (175 C) for about 45 minutes. In a convection oven, bake at 300 F (150 C).



 


6. Cool on a rack.


Juergen Krauss's picture
Juergen Krauss

Butterzopf - Swiss Sunday braid

On our last visit to my parents in Germany I chatted with my sister-in-law who lives in Switzerland - about bread.


She tried to make the Zopf many families enjoy in Switzerland on Sundays, but she couldn't reproduce the flaky texture which is so typical.


After a bit of research I found a recipe on www.schweizerbrot.ch which worked very well for me, and this Zopf has become quite popular with friends and family.


It is essentially like a Challah without sugar and goes well with all sorts of sweet toppings, as well as cheeses.


As flour you can get a special Zopfmehl in Switzerland, which usually is a blend of white spelt (10% to 30%) with plain white flour.


I used 20% spelt.


Here the formula:


Ingredient Weight Percent
white plain flour 800g 80%
white spelt flour 200g 20%
milk 300g 30%
water 300g 30%
egg 60g (1 large) 6%
butter 120g 12%
fresh yeast 30g 3%
salt 20g 2%
yield 1830g 183%

Mix ingredients without butter first, and work until gluten is somewhat developed.

Add butter and work the dough until it is elastic, smooth and makes a nice windowpane test.

Let double in size (this took about 1 hour at 23C), fold and let rest for another 30 minutes.

Divide and shape into a braid (I usually make 2 braids from this amount of dough, the recipe source suggests one big 2-strand braid)

Put ther braid(s) onto baking perchament, apply eggwash, let rest for another 15-30 minutes, egg-wash again.

Bake on lower shelf in pre-heated oven at 200C for about 50 minutes (depending on size, my half-size braids need about 45 min).

Part of the bread got eaten before I could take a photo, here is part of the remains (Iwill post a better picture when available):

Butterzopf 1

The crumb is flaky as it should be when you tear the bread:

Enjoy,

Juergen

 

cranbo's picture
cranbo

Burger Bun Shangri-La?

I had read on Chowhound in a 2003 post that Puritan Bakery in Carson, CA supplies most notable SoCal burger chains (including InNOut, Fatburger, and Tommy's, among others) with their buns. 


Interesting article in last week's Orange County Register about Puritan & their process:


From "The secret behind SoCal's best burgers" by Nancy Luna



Puritan buns are made the same way your grandmother used to bake bread in the kitchen – only at a much larger scale... Flour, water, shortening and yeast are mixed and set aside in a large trough where it rises and develops flavor...


At the end of the four- to six-hour fermentation process, the mixture (not considered dough, yet) bubbles up – becoming a taffy-like blob.


Plant workers and machines then take the sponge mixture and add sugar, yeast, salt, flour and water to make dough, which is then shaped into buns before baking. The end result of the seven-hour process is a spongy, pliable bun...


While its base sponge-dough recipe is the same, Puritan customizes buns for restaurants and chains with specific needs. For example, In-N-Out's four-inch buns are "tweaked" (Puritan won't say how) for better grilling results. Tommy's buns are made to better support its heavy chili slathered burgers. Islands restaurants use a larger, five-inch bun. Seeded buns are delivered to The Habit.



Full article at http://www.ocregister.com/articles/puritan-293345-burger-bakery.html


I think it's interesting that the sponge has shortening in it.... Haven't seen that before in a sponge, is it uncommon? Not to mention that their entire process (from sponge to finished product) is about 7 hours.


I also wonder about the "tweaks" for better grilling results; more sugar or shortening for better browning? Any other ideas of what tweaks they might be applying, for example, for support of heavier burgers?

I learned from the photos that Puritan does use hamburger bun pans. In the photo gallery, there is a decent photo showing the bun texture

alexandrut03's picture
alexandrut03

Hello all!

Hello all!


I'm Alex, and I just want to say that every morning when I wake up, the first thing I do is turning on the computer and reading all the new stuff on this site! I JUST LOVE IT!


I am from Romania, so... please, excuse my English!


 


This is what I've baked today :




 


I have two white starters (one @ 75% hydration and the other at 100%, those are the storage starters... fed twice a day and sometimes once, and a 100% rye @ 100% hydration). Usually I use for baking a levain built 6-12 earlier @ 50%, because here in Romania the flours are weak(10.5%-11 protein). 


 


GREAT SITE AND GREAT PEOPLE TOO! Hello again!

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