The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

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breadmantalking's picture
breadmantalking

My version of Reinhart's Oreganato Herb Bread



 


There are, of course many variations of the perfect sandwich loaf. Probably every bread-baking culture has its version. And probably a lot depends on the kind of sandwiches the people of the culture like to eat. So, for instance, Jewish sandwich bread, at least those breads from Eastern Europe, tend to be heavy on the rye flour, sometimes with caraway and always smothered with something like corned beef and onions. In France the perfect sandwich bread is a baguette-like roll called 'pain ordinaire', or ordinary bread. This is no ordinary bread, however. It is typically loaded up with a good hard, sharp cheese and washed down with strong coffee. 


 


This bread is Italian in origin, at least from its herb content, but the style is definitely French. A hybrid of sorts. The original contained some coarsely ground black pepper, which I have omitted since I know my customers. Personally I like food with a little heat, but my house mates.... not so much. Anyway, this bread, because of the added herbs and spices is great for sharp cheeses, or pickled or cured meats (cold cuts, corned beef, sausage) and even crispy veggies. Or a combination. It has a fairly close crumb, which could be more open if you leave to rise a little longer. The crust is only a little chewy. But I actually like it the way it is, since the density helps hold the contents of the sandwich. Enjoy!!


 


Here's What You'll Need:


4 cups AP flour


3/8 cup uncooked corn meal (coarse - polenta)


2 tsp. granulated garlic


3 tsp. dried parsley


3 tsp. dried oregano


3/4 Tbs. yeast


2 tsp. salt


about 1 1/2 cups warm water


 


Here's What You'll Need To Do:


1. Mix all the dry ingredients, including the herbs and the yeast together and mix thoroughly.



 


2. Add the water mixing as you pour it to form a rough dough.


 


3. Knead this mixture on a lightly-floured tabletop for about 10 minutes until it becomes quite smooth. It will be a little tacky, but smooth, and not at all sticky. Adjust the flour and/or water as needed to get the right texture.



 


4. Place the kneaded dough into a lightly-oiled bowl, turn to coat, then cover and let it rise in a warm place until doubled. This will take 1 1/2 to 2 hours. You may stretch and fold the dough halfway through if desired to develop the gluten more fully.


 


5. Form into a loaf shape and place into a prepared loaf pan. Let the dough rise again until it is about 1 inch (2 1/2 cm) above the lip of the pan.



 


6. Bake in a preheated oven at 350 F (175 C) for about 45 minutes. In a convection oven, bake at 300 F (150 C).



 


6. Cool on a rack.


Juergen Krauss's picture
Juergen Krauss

Butterzopf - Swiss Sunday braid

On our last visit to my parents in Germany I chatted with my sister-in-law who lives in Switzerland - about bread.


She tried to make the Zopf many families enjoy in Switzerland on Sundays, but she couldn't reproduce the flaky texture which is so typical.


After a bit of research I found a recipe on www.schweizerbrot.ch which worked very well for me, and this Zopf has become quite popular with friends and family.


It is essentially like a Challah without sugar and goes well with all sorts of sweet toppings, as well as cheeses.


As flour you can get a special Zopfmehl in Switzerland, which usually is a blend of white spelt (10% to 30%) with plain white flour.


I used 20% spelt.


Here the formula:


Ingredient Weight Percent
white plain flour 800g 80%
white spelt flour 200g 20%
milk 300g 30%
water 300g 30%
egg 60g (1 large) 6%
butter 120g 12%
fresh yeast 30g 3%
salt 20g 2%
yield 1830g 183%

Mix ingredients without butter first, and work until gluten is somewhat developed.

Add butter and work the dough until it is elastic, smooth and makes a nice windowpane test.

Let double in size (this took about 1 hour at 23C), fold and let rest for another 30 minutes.

Divide and shape into a braid (I usually make 2 braids from this amount of dough, the recipe source suggests one big 2-strand braid)

Put ther braid(s) onto baking perchament, apply eggwash, let rest for another 15-30 minutes, egg-wash again.

Bake on lower shelf in pre-heated oven at 200C for about 50 minutes (depending on size, my half-size braids need about 45 min).

Part of the bread got eaten before I could take a photo, here is part of the remains (Iwill post a better picture when available):

Butterzopf 1

The crumb is flaky as it should be when you tear the bread:

Enjoy,

Juergen

 

cranbo's picture
cranbo

Burger Bun Shangri-La?

I had read on Chowhound in a 2003 post that Puritan Bakery in Carson, CA supplies most notable SoCal burger chains (including InNOut, Fatburger, and Tommy's, among others) with their buns. 


Interesting article in last week's Orange County Register about Puritan & their process:


From "The secret behind SoCal's best burgers" by Nancy Luna



Puritan buns are made the same way your grandmother used to bake bread in the kitchen – only at a much larger scale... Flour, water, shortening and yeast are mixed and set aside in a large trough where it rises and develops flavor...


At the end of the four- to six-hour fermentation process, the mixture (not considered dough, yet) bubbles up – becoming a taffy-like blob.


Plant workers and machines then take the sponge mixture and add sugar, yeast, salt, flour and water to make dough, which is then shaped into buns before baking. The end result of the seven-hour process is a spongy, pliable bun...


While its base sponge-dough recipe is the same, Puritan customizes buns for restaurants and chains with specific needs. For example, In-N-Out's four-inch buns are "tweaked" (Puritan won't say how) for better grilling results. Tommy's buns are made to better support its heavy chili slathered burgers. Islands restaurants use a larger, five-inch bun. Seeded buns are delivered to The Habit.



Full article at http://www.ocregister.com/articles/puritan-293345-burger-bakery.html


I think it's interesting that the sponge has shortening in it.... Haven't seen that before in a sponge, is it uncommon? Not to mention that their entire process (from sponge to finished product) is about 7 hours.


I also wonder about the "tweaks" for better grilling results; more sugar or shortening for better browning? Any other ideas of what tweaks they might be applying, for example, for support of heavier burgers?

I learned from the photos that Puritan does use hamburger bun pans. In the photo gallery, there is a decent photo showing the bun texture

alexandrut03's picture
alexandrut03

Hello all!

Hello all!


I'm Alex, and I just want to say that every morning when I wake up, the first thing I do is turning on the computer and reading all the new stuff on this site! I JUST LOVE IT!


I am from Romania, so... please, excuse my English!


 


This is what I've baked today :




 


I have two white starters (one @ 75% hydration and the other at 100%, those are the storage starters... fed twice a day and sometimes once, and a 100% rye @ 100% hydration). Usually I use for baking a levain built 6-12 earlier @ 50%, because here in Romania the flours are weak(10.5%-11 protein). 


 


GREAT SITE AND GREAT PEOPLE TOO! Hello again!

jcking's picture
jcking

Sourdough Water

My understanding is the flour provides wild yeast and the air in your local provides the bacteria for the sweet/sour of sourdough. While building the sour it is usally kept covered to prevent crusting. What if one were to leave the water, that they would use in the next refreshment, uncovered along side the sour? The uncovered water could then pick up the bacteria. My thought is it could decrease the time necessary to reach its full sour. Comments? I've been using my chef for almost 2 years so I'm not some rambling theorist, not that there's anything wrong with that.


Jim

thebreadfairy's picture
thebreadfairy

Getting Ears* (not "Grigne"): An Observation

I have the opportunity now to use steam injection in my baking. I was curious as to what effect the timing of steaming from the time of loading would have. I prepared a formula and created two identical loaves. I preheated the oven to 425º and loaded the first loaf dry with no presteam. After about 1.5 minutes, I loaded the second loaf in the same oven and steamed as soon as the oven door closed. I was amazed at the results:



The loaf on the left was the dry start loaf. There is actually a tiny bit of grigne ear* at the upper left side of the score but the score is otherwise flat. The loaf on the right started to bloom about 3 minutes into the bake and developed the gorgeous grigne ears* you can see.


My inference from this is that for maximum grigne ears*, the earlier the steaming the better. On a future bake, I will try a presteam just before loading as well as the initial loading steam to see what effect this will have. This also helps me understand one of the reasons I have had such a wide variation in the quality of my grigne ears* from bake to bake.


Hope this helps someone. Comments and questions are welcome.


*Edited on 4/8/11 to correct misuse of "grigne". The raised flap of crust is actually an "ear".


 

joshuacronemeyer's picture
joshuacronemeyer

Dough Hydration Calculator

sourdough calculator


I made a simple Hydration Calculator.  http://joshuacronemeyer.github.com/Flour-and-Water/  I've tried to use a few other online hydration calculators and there are so many textboxes that I don't know what to do with them all!  This one has NO text fields.  Instead, each colored box represents one or more variables: flour, water, starter.  Just drag the box bigger or smaller to change the quantity and everything is calculated on the fly.  I love to make sourdough and I'm always playing with my recipes, or finding myself with too little or much of one ingredient or another.  I think this calculator makes it easy to play with a recipe and tailor it to your own needs.  I'm no professional baker so it might not seem suitable for the pros, but I've checked it against a handful of my favorite recipes and found it gives accurate results.  It is open source as well so if you are inclined to dabble in that sort of thing you can click the 'fork me on github' banner to get your own copy of the source code.

diverpro94's picture
diverpro94

French Date and Almond Tart

I love making tarts! It's my new obsession! I've tried a couple recipes, but this French Date and Almond Tart is my absolute favorite... Well after some recipe testing and revisions. In fact, I love it so much that I'm officially naming it my signature pastry.


 


The first time I made it was for a get well dinner for a friend. She just had major surgery and was under some pretty hefty prescription drugs when I delivered her a lasagna, a fresh loaf of pain de champagne, and a tart. She opened the box with the tart and replied, "Oh! Isn't this what they serve to the queen?" I quickly nodded my head and walked her to her chair. Too funny.


 


French Date and Almond


 


-Colby


Blog


Website

Maggie Lou's picture
Maggie Lou

Combining rising agents

I recently purchased Inn On the Creek ORGANIC SIX GRAIN PANCAKE MIX which has baking powder, bicarbonate of soda, and creme of tarter in the mix.  This may be an odd or even ridiculous question, but what would happen if I put a cup of this in, say a white bread recipe using yeast?


Anyone ever try this?

mdrdds's picture
mdrdds

Matzah reciepe

Passover is coming in about three weeks. I will have to put my bread baking on hold for a week. However if anyone has a recipe for matzah it would be appreciated.
Mike Robinson

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