The Fresh Loaf

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ElPanadero's picture
ElPanadero

Holey Moley

Some advice needed please.

Last couple of loaves have had holes like these which I initially thought was my failure to de-gas/knock back however I took extra time here to ensure I pressed out any large pockets at the shaping stage.  I'm guessing therefore this is a result of the hydration and proofing times?

These were the Pain Natural and Pain Rustique loaves from weekendbakery.com

http://www.weekendbakery.com/posts/sourdough-pain-naturel/

Poolish: Wheat 115g, Water 115g, starter 15g (100%)

Dough: Wheat 340g,  Water 180g, Salt 7.5g

Mixed, 20min autolyse, 4min knead, rest 50min, (S+F, rest 50min) x2,  shape, proof 2.5 hrs, bake

Oven spring is fine, taste is fine just too many large holes.

Cheers

 

 

golgi70's picture
golgi70

Crisper/Crunchier Crust

My experience with sourdough hearth breads is that after cooling and some time they have great shelf life but after a certain amount of time after cooling the crisp crunchy crust begins to become chewy.  I suppose the amount of time before this happens depends on many variables from the formula and the environment the bread is held.  I for one live in a temperate rain forest on the cost so lots of moisture in the air.  Is there a way to lengthen the crispness/crunchiness of a crust on a sourdough bread via formula or baking.  The bread is baked with steam for 18 minutes and finished in a convection oven for 20-25 minutes with added venting during the last 5-10 minutes.  The loaf is baked to a deep red with just a bit of "boldness" as a burnished crust is not desired. So baking longer/darker is not a solution.   

The loaf in question is a SF style sourdough with 15% pre-fermented flour (in a 12 hour 100% hydration levain) that is about 67% hydration.  Autolysed for 30 mintues.  Mixed to 78-80 deg F.  Bulk ferment for 4 hours with 2 stretch and folds.  Then it is shaped and retarded for 21 hours before being baked cold.  450 with steam for 18 minutes then 400 convection for 20-25 more.  

I tend to think this :"softening" of the crust is the nature of the beast but welcome any/all suggestions.

Thanks

Josh 

clazar123's picture
clazar123

Bosch Universal comment

I acquired a used Bosch Universal at a local thrift store for a ridiculously low price. It was a well used machine but worked. I was making my Whole wheat Breakfast bread and thought I'd use the Bosch to see how it worked. This is a Whole wheat loaf with fruit and nuts so I like to mix the dough very well before I add the fruit and nuts. I have been making it so long that I rarely use a recipe and sometimes have to adjust the dough as I go with either a little more water or a little more flour before the final mix/knead. What I learned is that this mixer has some idiosyncracies you have to pay attention to.

1. It really is designed for larger batches or stiffer dough (powerful motor!). My recipe has about 6 cups flour total. With that "small" amount of dough in the large plastic bowl, it tends to swirl rather than knead the dough. There is not enough volume to allow the dough to catch firmly enough on the sides of the slick plastic bowl to  tumble over itself. I wonder if the stainless steel bowl would have a different action?

2. If you add water to the already formed dough, it just slides around and around and around and  around......etc...etc.... I had to stop it and break up the dough clump so it would mix the added liquid into the dough. Perhaps if there was more dough in the bowl (10-12 cup flour) it would be less likely to perform this way?

3. I added the 2 cups fruit and nuts and it mixed in quickly and finally I seemed to have enough volume and friction that it caught on the bowl side and actually kneaded. The dough felt great when I put it to rise.

4. The bowl is harder to grip and handle when trying to remove the dough.Some of it is just not being used to the bowl and my hands are rather weak since surgery a few years ago. I can use a plastic rectangular dough scraper  and remove the dough with a single swipe while holding the handle of the SS kitchenaid bowl. The Bosch bowl has to be gripped by the rim while full of heavy dough or held in the crook of the elbow. Awkward for me and none of my scrapers matched the bowl contour so it was awkward to remove the dough.

I am used to using a K5A that is 30 yrs old and going strong.  The 2 machines really do handle dough differently. The K5A does not have as powerful a motor but it does a great job for me. I think for now I will keep the Bosch but I will use it for larger batches or if I ever travel into the bagel world.

adri's picture
adri

Very quick sourdough bread with a bit of rye and whole wheat

Yesterday I was a bit frustrated with a project and at cooking lunch I cut myself.
So I really needed to bake something, preferably with spelt or wheat (usually I bake rye >50%) which would give me a dough that I could really physically work with.

Problem: I don't like yeast and I had no levain built the day before. But I had a lot of starter in the fridge (about 70g / 2.5 ounces) - 100% rye and not fed for 10 days. A good time to feed it so I took 15g away and fed it with 30g of water, 30g of flour...

For my levain I needed a quick solution: Heat and high hydration and a high percentage of seed starter. For wheat you don't need the sourness, so I thought it might work:

This is the result: Wheat bread with 17.6% rye and 11.8% whole wheat and 76.5% hydration.

For the levain:
50g rye starter
50g rye flour
50g whole wheat flour.
200g water

Total: 225g water, 125g flour, 180% hydration
Kept at 28° for about 2.75 to 3 hours (28° = 82.4F)

For the autolyse:
350g levain
300g flour (I used 150g Bread flour (0.7% ash, 11,8% protein) and 150g french flour (0.55% ash))
I just let it rest for 35' after mixing it with a spoon. I already added the levain as
75g water

For the final dough I added 25g of Water and 8g of salt:
400 to 500 Slap&folds
2h of bulk fermentation with 4 Stech&Folds every 30'.
1,5h of fermentation in a banneton

In the oven:
15' at 250° (482F) with lots of steam (a huge mug of water for my small oven, poured on 1kg (2.2 pounds) of steel nails I preheated in the oven).
30' at 200° (with removed the steam)

##############################################

Overall Formula:

Levain:
50% rye starter at 100% hydration
50% rye flour
50% whole wheat flour
200% water

final dough:
70.6% wheat flour
82.4% levain (at 180% hydration)
23.5% water
1,88% salt

hydration = water + water portion in the levain = 23.5% + 82.4%*(180%/280%) = ca. 76.5%
flour = flour + flour portion in the levain = 70.6 + 82.4%*(100/280) = ca. 100,0% :)

#############################################

lg|Adrian

neilbaldwyn's picture
neilbaldwyn

Fermented Oat Sourdough

Pinhead oatmeal fermented for 48 hours with a rye starter before incorporating into the dough. Finished in oatbran.

ichadwick's picture
ichadwick

Proofing dough in another appliance - crock pot?

My house is normally fairly cool during the day - 61-62F from 7:45 a.m., until 5 pm. That's when I do most of my baking, however. Dough rises slowly and sometimes incompletely. Looking for a solution.

I'm about ready to build a proofing box, but before I go to the effort, has anyone had any experience using a crock pot or slow cooker for proofing dough? Seems to me it should work. Use the low ("keep warm" setting intermittently to warm the dough for a couple of hours. Not sure how hot the "keep warm" setting is, though. Might have to warm some water to test it.

Any ideas or comments? I suppose I could use the oven as well, just turn it on, then off when it gets past 100F, open the door so it vents, and put the dough container inside...

Thanks...

katyajini's picture
katyajini

Adapting bread machine recipe, 2 questions

I am looking at Beth Hensperger's Bread Machine book.  There are so many interesting recipes, I would like to make some of them.  Could I just take a BM recipe and make it by hand or stand mixer?  I don't see anything that is glaringly different from a recipe that is written for hand mixing, at least not that I can tell. Or is there a kind of guide line for making BM recipes outside the machine?

Specifically for her recipes, she adds a lot of gluten to the BM version VS none to the same bread recipe made by hand in her Bread Bible.  Why is that?  Why so much gluten for the BM version?

 

Thank you so much for your help!

  

shopkins1994's picture
shopkins1994

Correct use of Soy Lecithin?

Hi Everyone. Can someone tell me how to use granular soy lecithin in an existing recipe? I have the granular soy lecithin from King Arthur Flour and on the front it says "Use 1-2 Tablespoons per 3 cups of flour", however, on the back it says, "Substitute 1-2 tablespoons per 3 cups of flour for an equal amount of fat in your recipe." Does anyone know which is it? Is it in addition or replace?

Thanks,

Sam

huck's picture
huck

hello!

I'M HUCK FROM CHICAGO.  I'VE BEEN EXPERIMENTING WITH VARIOUS BREAD RECIPES FOR THE PAST 20 YEARS.  I MADE MY OWN STARTER ABOUT 5 YEARS AGO...BUT AFTER STORING IT IN THE FRIG FOR WAY TO LONG....I JUST HAD TO TOSS IT.  IT TOOK ME NEARLY A MONTH TO GET IT GOING BUT I DID SAVE SOME...BY DRYING IT OUT IN SHEETS.  I THEN BROKE UP THE SHEETS INTO SMALLER PIECES AND VACUUM SEALED THEM IN JARS.  NOW I HAVE TRIED TO "WAKE" UP (BY HYDRATION AND FLOUR) ..WITH NO SUCCESS.  HAS ANYONE TRIED THIS BEFORE? 

happycrust's picture
happycrust

Crust separating from loaf - all round.

I make bread by hand kneading, allow to rise to at least twice the original volume, raise in bread tins and bake at 205*C for ten minutes and 200*C for twenty five minutes.

Lately, particularly with loaves which have been frozen, there occurs this rather odd all round separation. Can anybody explain why, please ?

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