The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

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ibor's picture
ibor

The triple rope (side by side) 3 strand braid

From:; The Art of Braiding Bread

http://myfoodaddress.blogspot.com/

ghazi's picture
ghazi

starter feeding

Hello everybody

I have got 2 starters going now, 1 is a WW and the other rye.

Both are more than a month old, the WW being more mature. Although I find when It comes to bake sourdough without a tiny boost of commercial yeast, the dough does not rise especially when formed for final proof.

Heres a recipe I am using from River Cottage handbook

Sponge - kept at around 70 degrees

250g strong white flour

350ml warm water

100g starter

After 12 or so hours

I add 300g string white flour and 12.5g of salt, knead long enough so its strtchy then leave for bulk fermentataion

The recipe says to deflate every hour for next 4 hours, what is difference if I just left for a long bulk istead?

When shaped the dough takes forever to change, in fact I don't see much difference

I maintain my starter at 100% hydration by adding 50g flour 50g water to 50g starter.

In the book it says to feed the starter its weight so 25g flour to 25 water for 50g starter. Might it be that I am overfeeding the culture before it has developed to maintain at high feedings?

Since I live in a very hot climate the starter lives next to A/C which is on at 22 degrees c. What measures can I take to make sure my starter is very active, I don't intend to keep in fridge since I want to develop flavor for as long as possible before I have to put in fridge.

Ghazi

 

emkay's picture
emkay

Overnight country blonde in a loaf pan

I've been baking mostly boules at home since the cast iron combo cooker has been my method for generating steam. Sometimes I just feel like having a loaf pan-shaped bread, but I still want to have all those hearth bread qualities.

My favorite naturally leavened loaf pan breads in the city are from Outerlands and Josey Baker. Outerlands sells only one kind of bread since it's a restaurant not a bakery. You can see his levain bread in this Tartine video http://vimeo.com/14354661 at around 2:30. The other bread is the "wonder bread" from Josey Baker which is the opposite of that supermarket  fluff bread of the same name. It's tangy, chewy and moist with a crispy, crackly crust. Perfect for PB&J (or, if you prefer something fancy, almond butter sprinkled with Maldon sea salt and drizzled with rooftop honey).

For this week's bake I decided to make a naturally leavened bread in a loaf pan just like the ones I mentioned. I used Ken Forkish's overnight country blonde formula. This was my first time using this fomula so I prepared myself by reading TFL posts from others who have already tried it. The "overnight" bulk fermentation at room temperature seemed to be where people had some problems. I mixed my dough late at night so that I would be awake in the morning to catch the dough before it would triple. It's fairly cool in my house (68F/20C) so my 11 hour bulk fermentation seemed to be in line with Forkish's 12-15 hour timeline. My dough didn't have as many bubbles along the sides of the container as I would have liked, but the dough was already 2.5 times the original size so I decided to proceed with shaping.


ocbl_loaf_1b

Dough proofed at room temp for 4 hours then I baked it at 425F on a stone covered with a stainless steel bowl for 20 minutes and uncovered for another 20 minutes. Then I removed the bread from the loaf pan and baked it directly on the stone for 5 minutes.
ocbl_loaf_1c

ocbl_loaf_1d

The crumb was moist and chewy. The crust was crispy for a few hours out of the oven, but softened by the next day. It was quite sour just the way I like it!
ocbl_loaf_1e

My results were very close to what I get at Outerlands and Josey Baker, so overall I was quite pleased.
outerlands

JBBwonderbread

I also baked some bourbon pecan pie chocolate brownies.
pecan_pie_brownie_2

pecan_pie_brownie_3

pecan_pie_brownie_1

Happy Mother's Day to all!

:) Mary

CJRoman's picture
CJRoman

I'm about to cry!!!

I have been baking pretzels for a long time....but recently, they have started sticking to the parchment and I CAN NOT get them off. I have lost SO many batches.

First I thought the parchment was crappy, so I bought a big box of restaurant parchment (1,000 sheets) and I am pulling them out now and having to FRANTICALLY scrape them off. It's awful! I'm even SPRAYING the parchment while they are in the lye!

I have no idea whats wrong. My convection oven is at 430...I shake the lye off before they go down...

What in the world?!

kbmom's picture
kbmom

Question about Ankarsrum

Hi.  I've been lurking and reading in these forums for some time now, but decided to now join for all the excellent advice and sharing that I've seen here.  My main question right now is, how does the older (less wattage, but I know that doesn't necessarily mean anything) N24 DX200 or even Magic Mill compare with the new N30 Ankrasrum?  I have seen on Craigslist one of each of these older models for reasonable prices.  Would it be worth it or should I bite the bullet and spend twice as much for the newest N30?

I current have a Bosch Compact (MUM4) with every possible attachment that I spent a fortune for (I know they dropped in price considerably, but when I ordered it, it was a good chunk of change) about six years ago, and I really dislike it.  The mixer itself is okay power-wise, but I find it doesn't completely get everything from the bottom of the bowl mixed well, things stay lumpy, and it's hard to get the head down with a hook or whip into the bowl.  It hits the side of the bowl and has to be forced into the bowl.  Everything from cookie dough to bread dough climbs up to the head of the machine and I'm not usually making large batches.  It's hard to clean and it's often a mess after using, even with using the splatter shield.  The attachments I ordered are a joke.  I would up buying a dedicated meat grinder so I don't end up with mush, and a full size Cuisinart food processor.  The ice cream thing has never worked no matter how long I freeze it.  The only attachment that works well is the blender.

I really don't want to make another huge, expensive mistake.  I would get just the mixer itself and possibly the grater attachment, as I've found dedicated appliances are the way to go and now I've got them after being so disappointed with my Bosch's attachments.  Anyone still using either of the older models?  Are you still happy with them?  Money is a little tight for spending $800 on a new mixer, so that's why I was looking at previously loved (or not loved?), but I'll save up for it if that's really the way to go.  I want to get back into breadmaking and i make pretty much everything from scratch, just not in super huge batches except during the holidays.

PetraR's picture
PetraR

OMG I was lucky. phewww

Note to self: Do not bake at 2.15 am in the Morning when you are tired but can not sleep.

I wanted to bake a white loaf which I usually enhance with unfed wheat Sourdough Starter.

I had pulled it out in the Afternoon, fed it and put the half that I took out in a bowl for the white loaf.

In my tired head I gone and dumped the white Starter from the Jar in the Sink.

Why did I do it????? 

I have NO NO NO Idea at all. 

Menopause?

Well, that is my excuse and I shall stick to it.

Thank god that the Unfed Starter was not yet mixed in with Flour, it just sat in that bowl.

It was about 60g, just what I needed.

You can not imagine how happy I was.

* I even done the happy dance round the kitchen, but psssst... *

Well , later I remembered that I have my backup wheat Starter in the fridge and dried Starter in the freezer.

Now THAT made me feel even more stupid.

Back up your Starters people!

 

Doughtastic's picture
Doughtastic

Sticky disaster

I recently made a loaf of sourdough from a recipe I found on shipton mill site. The dough looked great the best I've ever made. I don't have a proving basket yet so I floured a tea towel and placed it in a bowl over night (longer than the recipe stated) by morning it looked fantastic more than doubled and sprung back when prodded I tiped the bread out only to find it stuck to the tea towel and ruined has any one got any advice  

mj05's picture
mj05

Levine question

I couldn’t use my Tartine bread levine “on time”: is any way to quickly “refresh” levine or I’ll have to start all over and wait another 6 – 8 hrs? 

CAphyl's picture
CAphyl

Pain de Campagne

I was inspired by Syd's bake to try my first Pain de Campagne.  I wasn't happy with the first bake, although my husband really enjoyed the taste and texture of the bread.  It was extremely light and made great sandwiches. As I often do, I froze the other half of the dough to make at a later date, and I baked it today.  As usual, my second bake from the frozen loaf turned out better than the first bake from fresh.  The first loaf didn't get much height, but had good crumb. The second loaf had much better oven spring and more height. Both had excellent, tangy taste. I have made a crumb comparison between the two loaves below. The first crumb shot is from the fresh loaf; the second is from the bake today. 

Crumb from the first bake.

Pain de Campagne (adapted from Syd’s recipe)

Levain

  • 50g mature whole wheat starter (mine was mixed)
  • 100g water
  • 100g whole wheat flour

Allow to peak.  This could take from 4-10 hours.  Mine took 8 hours.

Main Dough

  • 200g of the levain
  • 350g water
  • 50g rye
  • 1/2 tsp diastatic malt powder
  • 450g bread flour

Disperse the levain in the water with a wire whisk until there is a good foam on top. Next, whisk in rye and malt powder.  Then add bread flour with spatula and mix until all the flour has been moistened.

  • autolyse for 50-60 minutes

Then:

  • add 10g salt
  • knead to medium gluten development (if the dough is sticky, you can use your dough scraper.  Try not to add more flour.  Just enough for your surface and hands.

Now:

  • bulk ferment for 1-2 hours with a turn at 30 minutes (I left the dough for 2 hours and turned twice).

Next:

  • pre-shape
  • rest 10 minutes
  • final shape

Put into well floured banneton and after about half an hour cover and:

  • retard for 12 hours in the fridge
  • let the dough warm up just before the bake; you’ll see it rise a bit more

Bake

  •  at 500F in a covered baker for 30 minutes

Then:

  • Remove the lid and reduce heat to 435 convection, baking for another 20 - 25 minutes

If you don’t have a covered baker (Syd’s original instructions):

Bake

  •  at 230 C with steam for 15 minutes

Then:

  • reduce heat to 200 C and bake for a further 30 - 35 minutes

The proportionately large amount of levain in this recipe means that the dough develops really quickly hence the relatively short bulk fermentation time.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Getting Ready for Ploetziade 2

Lucy has been gathering up ancient grains like farro and einkorn and Kamut and other allowed newer organic heirloom grains that are being replanted in small quantities in Arizona like Desert Durum, Pima Club and Sonoran White.

 

It is heartening that the folks at Hayden Mills and the O’Odham / Pima Indians at Ramona Farms are replanting these grains and offering them for sale - even if at steep prices.  It has been an interesting endeavor just to find some of these and talk to the people involved.

 

We know there are so many other grains out there that could be brought back to life but there is a reason why these grains went out of favor in the first place too and not many bread bakers can afford to spend $5-$7 a pound for these grains either.

 

One of Lucy’s recipes took the left over 85% extraction 7 grain flour from last Friday’s bake that already had farro and Kamut in the mix and added some Hayden Mills Desert Durum and Farro to it along with the Einkorn we found at Whole Foods to get the mix up to a real 9 grain bread.  I know that Lucy has an 11 or maybe even 13 grain variation in her someday.

 

Even though she already had some rye in the mix she tossed in some left over whole rye too just to get some whole grain in there even though this bread doesn’t need it being that the rest of the grains are 85% extraction. We have been wanting to make a bread like this for a while to see what getting the hardest bits out of the mix might  bring to the party.

 

The other bread is a 50% whole grain bread using Pima Club and White Sonoran for the whole grains and AP for the other 50%.  The two whole grains are white wheat varieties that are supposedly low in gluten so the AP was a good paring to keep the gluten low.

 

Folks think that these ’weak gluten’  flours are good for making tortillas, cookies and cakes and they are but eventually, we want to try them out on baguettes since they too are also made with low gluten flour – and pizza too.   I’m guessing, after seeing this bread from the outside, that it also can make some fine sourdough too.

 

The mis en place for ........................................................a fine Chinese 5 spice stir fry

The levain for the 9 grain was made with the same 85% extraction flour but the levain for the AZ bread was made from the 15% hard bits sifted out from the milling process.   If there are hard bits in the mix we like to put them into the levain build to get them a wet for as long as possible.  The other difference was that the levain for the 9 grain bread was refrigerated for 48 hours, 1 hour after the 3rd feeding and the AZ levain was not refrigerated at all.

 

Each of the breads had a 1 hour autolyse with the dough flour and water with the pink Himalayan sea salt sprinkled on top.  The hydration was 5% higher for the 9 grain at 80%.  Each went through 3 sets of slap and folds of 5, 1 and 1 minute on 15 minute intervals.

Oddly the 85% extraction dough felt much more slack and new thought it would be the other way around.   No stretch and folds or bulk ferment was done.  We quickly pre-shaped and then shaped a boule and an oval and placed the dough into the baskets, bagged them and retarded them for 14 hours.

 

First thing this morning we fired up Big Old Betsy for the 550 F regular bake preheating.   When she hit 525 F we put 2 of Sylvia’s steaming pans and a larger one of David’s Lava Rocks.   Sylvia’s pans had rolled up kitchen towels in them and all 3 were half full of water.  By the time BOB hit 5560 F the steam was billowing.

 

A healthy breakfast and lunch should always be on the menu.We removed the dough from the fridge and the baskets by overturning them onto parchment on a peel.  We did a quick slash job on them and into the oven on the bottom stone they went.  After 2 minutes we turned the oven down to 465 F and continued to steam for a total of 15 minutes.  Once the steam came out we turned the oven down to 425 F - convection this time.

The smaller AZ loaf was done in 30 minutes total and the larger 9 grain loaf took 5 minutes more.  Both sprang, bloomed browned up nicely with tiny blisters.  One was slightly darker than the other one though.  After coming out of the oven crunchy, the crust of both went soft as they cooled.

 

Lucy got all dolled up today for Mother's Day with a bath and some much needed grooming.

The crumb of both came out less open than we had hoped for but for bread this healthy and hearty it is still light enough, moist and soft.  Lucy and I liked the 9 grain because of its deeper flavor and more sour but the girls will like the lighter AZ bread the best.  Neither has ans seeds,nuts, fruits, scald or sprouts in them even though both are healthy options for sure.

Lucy reminds you to not forget the salad especially when it has home grown heirloom tomatoes. 

Formula

Pima Club and White Sonoran Boule

 

 

 

 

 

 

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

SD starter

5

0

0

5

1.08%

AP

5

10

15

30

7.50%

15% Extract Pima & Sonoran

5

10

15

30

7.50%

Water

10

20

30

60

15.00%

Total

25

40

60

125

31.25%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

62.5

15.63%

 

 

 

Water

62.5

15.63%

 

 

 

Hydration

100.00%

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

15.08%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

Pima Club

100

25.00%

 

 

 

AP

200

50.00%

 

 

 

White Sonoran

100

25.00%

 

 

 

Dough Flour

400

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

9

1.95%

 

 

 

Water

289

72.25%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

72.25%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

462.5

 

 

 

 

Water

351.5

 

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

76.00%

 

 

 

 

Whole Grain  %

50.00%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

829

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

75.03%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

 

Red Malt

3

0.75%

 

 

 

White Malt

3

0.75%

 

 

 

Total

6

1.50%

 

 

 

 

85 Percent Extraction Multigrain Sourdough

 

 

 

 

 

 

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

SD starter

10

0

0

10

1.71%

85% Extraction Wheat

10

20

40

70

13.73%

Water

10

20

40

70

13.73%

Total

30

40

80

150

29.41%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

75

14.71%

 

 

 

Water

75

14.71%

 

 

 

Hydration

100.00%

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

13.45%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

Whole Rye

37

7.25%

 

 

 

85% Extracttion MG Mix

473

92.75%

 

 

 

Dough Flour

510

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

11

1.88%

 

 

 

Water

416

81.57%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

81.57%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

585

 

 

 

 

Water

491

 

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

83.93%

 

 

 

 

Whole Grain Equivalent %

7.35%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

1,115

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

80.10%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

 

Red Malt

6

1.18%

 

 

 

White Malt

6

1.18%

 

 

 

VW Gluten

16

3.14%

 

 

 

Total

28

5.49%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

85% Etraction includes:: Buckwheat, Einkorn. barley, farro

 

 

 wheat, spelt, corn & oat - Plus the whole rye makes 9 grains

 

 

 

 

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