The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

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maojn's picture
maojn

My Beautiful and Delicious Zebra Chiffon Cake

寄件者 desert

 

寄件者 desert

 

寄件者 desert

 

If you can read Chinese, here is my blogspot link: http://maobaocun.blogspot.com/2014/01/4.html

This cake requires two kind of batter: chocolate batter and original batter. I made two yolk batter separately then split the meringue to half and mix with the two yolk batter individually into cake batter. Then dispense the two cake batter alternately using batter dispensers to make the zebra pattern. 

Ingredients:

Cocoa yolk batter

Large Eggs 5x

Milk 100g

Cake flour 120g

Cocoa powder 20g

vegetable oil 80g

 

Original yolk batter

Large Eggs 5x

Milk 100g

Cake flour 120g

vegetable oil 80g

 

Meringue

large egg white 10x

sugar 240g

 

This is how I make chocolate yolk batter. Use the same method to make original yolk batter but without cocoa powder: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a9ytnAohCEY

This is how i whisk the egg white, it's very important regarding the order of speed increase to make a stable meringue, therefore a very fine textured product: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CTIRmDaqziA

This is how I mix both of them together. The way I mix them minimize the degas: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KtFrUFejo58

This is how I dispense both cake batter into cake pan: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7j9ui7Ql3I4

Bake at 115C for 20 min, 155C for 20-25 min for 2x 8" cake.

As soon as I took out the cake from oven, I kind of 'throw' it to the counter top so that the steam that's trapped can escape sooner. Then I flip it over to cool the cake down for about 40 min before I remove it from the pan.

 

寄件者 desert
寄件者 desert

 

The same method can also be used to make pure cocoa cake, green tea mocha cake, or original cake.

寄件者 desert
寄件者 desert
寄件者 desert

 

suki mandelbrot's picture
suki mandelbrot

using steam to get a crispy crust

i was wondering if anyone has any advise. I am trying to create  a crisp crust to my bread.  I have a domestic gas oven and have tried the usual suggestions such as spraying the dough with water, adding trays of water and flopping wet cloths into the oven cavity to create steam non has been successful.

I borrowed an electric food steamer with 3 stackable plastic baskets from work. Because of their size I made 3  9 ounce (255 g) white bread batons proved them in the steamer baskets on pieces of baking parchment. I steamed them in a stack for 4 minutes, lifting them out of the steamer was a bit tricky  as the crust was still soft and i was a bit mean with the baking parchment. Then baked them still on their bits of parchment  the result was quite good and they had a nice colour and flavour but still not quite as crusty as i would like. So any suggestions would be great. I am considering borrowing a fish kettle from work which has a liftable trivet and of course would make a considerably longer loaf.

sorry no photos as the bread was demolished in minutes

suki mandelbrot's picture
suki mandelbrot

using steam to get a crispy crust

i was wondering if anyone has any advise. I am trying to create  a crisp crust to my bread.  I have a domestic gas oven and have tried the usual suggestions such as spraying the dough with water, adding trays of water and flopping wet cloths into the oven cavity to create steam non has been successful.

I borrowed an electric food steamer with 3 stackable plastic baskets from work. Because of their size I made 3  9 ounce (255 g) white bread batons proved them in the steamer baskets on pieces of baking parchment. I steamed them in a stack for 4 minutes, lifting them out of the steamer was a bit tricky  as the crust was still soft and i was a bit mean with the baking parchment. Then baked them still on their bits of parchment  the result was quite good and they had a nice colour and flavour but still not quite as crusty as i would like. So any suggestions would be great. I am considering borrowing a fish kettle from work which has a liftable trivet and of course would make a considerably longer loaf.

sorry no photos as the bread was demolished in minutes

chris319's picture
chris319

Falling Number Measurement Laboratory

Here is a really way-out question.

Does anyone know of a laboratory which will measure the falling number of a sample of flour?

(SOME TIME LATER)

Just answered my own question:

http://www.californiawheat.org/milling/price-lists/wheat-quality-testing/

isand66's picture
isand66

Old School Jewish Deli Rye with Onions

One of my favorite ryes is the one from Inside the Jewish Bakery by Norm and Stan.  I have not made it for a while but I figured it was time to try it again since I've been getting a lot of questions about it on my other blog site.

I used freshly milled rye flour in place of the white rye flour in the original recipe and I also added 25 grams of dehydrated onions which were re-hydrated by mixing with the water for the dough.  I used some of my recently made rye starter at 100% hydration and compensated for the lower 80% hydration called for by adjusting the flour and water slightly.

I found the starter and the dough to be very easy to handle and the end result of the bake was probably one of the best ryes I have made to date.  The crumb was nice and moist and the onion flavor was just enough to make this the perfect bread for a hot pastrami sandwich with melted Munster Cheese.

Closeup

If you have not tried this one, you don't know what you are missing!  There is no comparison between this rye bread and the sorry excuse they sell in the supermarket.

Crumb

Skibum's picture
Skibum

Back in business: 6 day sourdough primer

Well my last SD challah bake I made the bonehead move of using up all of my precious sweet levain and had to start another levain again using Debra Winks, pineapple juice solution detailed well here:

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/10901/pineapple-juice-solution-part-2

This is my second successful SD build using this method and here is the Cole's notes version. It pays to keep notes:

Day 1: 2 Tbs dark rye flour + 2 Tbs pineapple juice. Stir a couple of times a day. 

Repeat above for days 2 - 4

By the end of day 4 you should have a nice bubbly seed.

Day 5 mix 1 part seed, one part water with NO CHLORINE,  and one part flour. I kept my notes from last time and used 20% dark rye and 80% strong bread flour, as was the case here. The photo was day 6.

Today I fed two starters from my new baby one dark rye 1:1:1 and one white same %'s with again 20% rye to kick start things. Easy peasy, but when doing this process I  am pretty careful about cleanliness and the water having zero chlorine -- Britta filtered water, which is boiled then cooled in a glass Pyrex container in the sunlight. Taking a page from Ken Forkish's book, the water is added to the seed at 80F.

Tomorrow morning I will do the first build of the ITJB NY Jewish deli rye and will use onions and onion water this go around in build two. I am salivating just thinkig about it!

Happy baking folks!

Brian

Janet Yang's picture
Janet Yang

Electricity bill

It's probably no coincidence that I got seriously into bread baking when my daughter went off to college. All those free hours and so much to learn; I was baking a test loaf just about every day. I expected the electricity bill to skyrocket.

Surprise: The electric bill actually went down—because my daughter went off to college. She always took such l-o-n-g showers, no matter how much we reminded her about saving energy and water. Now it's the dorm's problem, and I can bake as much as I like.

Janet

dosco's picture
dosco

BBA Basic Sourdough ... 60 hour cold ferment (!!)

Another bake of BBA Basic Sourdough. Life interfered a bit on this one, had to drive to NY (from MD) to goto a party, then had a sports tournament the next day in PA. I had to let the preferment sit in the fridge for an extra day, and the autolysed flour also went into the fridge for a 24 hour period. After I mixed the dough I had intended a 36 hour ferment but I had some other priorities (... work ...) and it stayed in the fridge for 60 hours.

I preshaped and let the boules proof for 30 minutes at 80F. Final shaping is still a problem for me; I still haven't gotten a linen couche. The final loaves proofed seam-side-up for 45 minutes at 80F ... based on the final loaves I think they were underproofed (although I think it is also possible the poor shaping may also have contributed to the problem). I got an "ear" though so that was satisfying.

Flavor and texture were excellent, I baked in the morning and the first loaf was gone by dinner.

remason's picture
remason

Troubleshooting beater alignment

Hi, I just purchased a Hobart-era KitchenAid Mixer on eBay. The model is K5SS. The seller said that the beater hit the bottom of the bowl when mixing on all speeds, but when I received the mixer the beater actually hits the middle of left side of the bowl, not the bottom (I spread butter on the bowl to see where the beater was making contact). The beater height is fine (it just barely skims the top of dime left at the bottom of the bowl), and I have been able to adjust it successfully using a mallet on the yoke arms as per the instruction manual (the older models don't have an adjustment screw). But I have been unable to get the beater to clear the side of the bowl. The whisk attachment does not hit the sides at all. Does anyone have any idea how to fix this problem? The picture above shows the marks left in the butter by the misaligned beater.

Thanks!

MANNA's picture
MANNA

Starter methods and developing sour

I know this topic shows up alot. I have developed a starter using the pineapple method and it works great. Been baking many wonderful loafs that I share with everyone here. My problem is that no matter what it never gets sour. I have tried all the recommendations from everyone here, no luck. After contacting KAF and asking for input from Jeff I got a return call from the bakers hotline a couple days later saying to follow the demolder method from his book. I did and there was a faint sour flavor. So I kept it up but never got it to sour more. I only baked that one loaf that had a hint of sour and just couldnt get it again. So, I decided to start anew and ditched my pineapple sour. Mixed some dark rye with water, no pineapple. After 3 days of 1:1:1 refreshing every 24 hours I switched to my all-purpose flour (KAF Sir Galahad) and continued my 24hour 1:1:1. So, what are the resuts? A sour sourdough. When you uncap this thing and take a sniff it reaches out and slaps ya! I think in my environment the pineapple method produced a ferment of pure yeast and the bacteria could not get a chance to grow. I used the Dole pineapple juice in the small cans. They come in a six pack so I still have 5 left. I may use one in the future if my sourdough becomes infected and I need to get the bad beasties out. What are everyones thoughts?

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