The Fresh Loaf

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dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Tête du Désert Vide de Lucie Sud-ouest Germées 5 Pain au Levain

It is supposed to rain for the net two days here in the AZ desert but be clear for the Super Bowl on Sunday.  No worries anyway since the stadium has a real grass movable field and a movable roof too.  Still, Lucy was thinking about how beautiful, if dry and desolate, the desert usually is while I was thinking about how much the desert and Lucy’s brain are alike.  It’s odd how the names of her breads come about.

 

This one was a mix of 5 sprouted and whole grains including, wheat, spelt,  rye, einkorn and emmer (Hayden Mills Farro)  The whole and sprouted grains totaled 40% of the flour and half of them were sprouted.  The levain was 13% of the flour and the hydration was 77% so, it was not too wet for a change. 

 

With sprouted grains in the mix, we start on Tuesday for a Friday’s weekly bake.  First the grains have to be soaked for 3-4 hours and sprouted up to the 24 hour mark or so – stopping them when they first begin to ‘chit’ showing their first tiny toots    Then o Wednesday we dry them in the dehydrator at 105 F and then grind them with the other whole grains.

 

Then the milled whole grain sprouted flours are sifted to remove hard bits (in this case 28% extraction) that we feed to the starter in 3 stages (2 -3 and 4 hours in this case) to make the levain.  This left the 72% extraction for the dough flour mix.  Once the levain doubles after the 3rd feeding it goes into the fridge of a 24 hour cold retard at 36 F.

 

On Thursday we got out the levain from the fridge and the yogurt whey from the freezer.  We zapped the whey in the microwave to thaw it out and warm it up for the autolyse which was an hour as the levain warmed up.  We sprinkled the salt on the top of the autolyse so we wouldn’t forget it.

 

Once the levain hit the mix, we mixed it in a bit with a spoon before beginning the 3 sets of slap and folds on 8, 1 and 1minute and 3 sets of stretch and folds from the compass points .  All were done 20 minutes apart, and the dough stopped sticking to the counter at the end of first set of slap and folds.

 

A yummy cheesecake and a deep dish chicken pot pie!

We then let the dough ferment and rest for a half and hour before putting it in a plastic oiled bowl for a 8 hour bulk ferment, followed by a shaped 12 hour cold proof making this bake a quadruple retard - a week for the starter, 24 hours for the levain and 8 hour bulk ferment and a 12 hour proof.

 

How Lucy comes up with these methods just goes to show how much she has slowed down. It has been forever since we tried to do this quadruple madness and the last time wasn’t pretty if I remember right - which proves beyond a doubt how much I have slowed down too.

 

Thank goodness geneticists have isolated a jellyfish gene that makes people not be so forgetful – great for Alzheimer’s cases.   You can now be genetically modified to perk up the old brain pan in ways like never before.  I’m trying to get them to put it in wheat so I can kill two birds with one stone!

 

Once the dough came out of the fridge after the 12 proof, we let it warm up on the counter heating pad for 1 ½ hours before starting up Big old Bets to 500 F preheat.  We un- molded the dough onto parchment paper on a peel, gave it one big slash, onto the bottom stone it went and quickly covered by our heavy aluminum MagnaLite turkey roaster bottom for 20 minutes of steam . After 2 minutes we turned the oven down to 450 F

 

Once the lid came off, we continued baking at 425 F convection for 20 minutes until the temperature read 205 F.  Once the oven was off, we left the bread on the stone for another 5 minutes until it hit 208 F and then removed it to a cooling rack.  The dough sprang and bloomed pretty good under steam and browned up well enough too.  It was a bit over proofed but not horribly so.

 

Can’t wait to see the crumb once it cools down.  The crumb came out not as open as the rise and spring would suggest.  Still, it was very soft moist and glossy.  A perfect sandwich crumb.  This is the kind of crumb we get when we do a long bulk ferment in the fridge and then a long shaped proof in the fridge too -just too much messing with the dough.  Once the again, the taste was great and quite different than the porter bread.  The whey added a sharper tang  but not too much.  The sprouts really came through too.  A fine loaf that we can't wait to make toast out of tomorrow for breakfast and a sandwich for lunch.  

 Taco Tuesdays are always a hit as was the sandwich for lunch.

 

SD Levain Build

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

1 Week Retarded Rye Sour Starter

10

0

0

10

1.53%

28% Extract Sprouted & Whole 5 Grain

10

20

43

73

11.18%

Water

10

20

43

73

11.18%

Total

30

40

86

156

23.89%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain Totals

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

78

11.94%

 

 

 

Water

78

11.94%

 

 

 

Levain Hydration

100.00%

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total Flour

11.94%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

72% Extraction Sprouted and Whole 5 Grain

185

28.33%

 

 

 

KA Bread & LaFama AP 50/50

390

59.72%

 

 

 

Total Dough Flour

575

88.06%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

13

1.99%

 

 

 

Yogurt Whey

425

65.08%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

73.91%

 

 

 

 

Total Flour w/ Starter

653

 

 

 

 

Yogurt Whey & Water

503

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Hydration w/ Starter & Adds

77.03%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

1,169

 

 

 

 

% Whole & Sprouted Grains - half each

40.28%

 

 

 

 

 

 Lucy reminds us to never ever forget to add a good salad to any meal.

 

JannS's picture
JannS

Percent of gluten in different flours

I am looking for a list of flours that contain gluten and how much gluten each of them have. I am allergic to wheat and want to start experimenting baking bread without wheat. I am not gluten free, I can have gluten in other flours like rye and barley. I dislike gluten free bread mixes, recipes and flour mixes because they have little nutrition, are high in calories and mostly made from starchy flours - rice, potato, etc.  Notes about baking with these other flours would also be helpful.

Years ago I found a web page that had such a list, but I can't seem to find in again. 

Any help would be appreciated. 

Jann

 

 

digopenna's picture
digopenna

Dry Figs and Brazil`s Nuts Tartine

Hello bakers!

Im a long time reader, but finally achieve a bread that Im not ashamed to share with you guys.

This is a Tartine-style bread with some dry figs and brazil`s nuts. Its basically the Tartine recepie from the Weekend Bakery website (weekendbakery.com), so they describe the steps much better than I could do it.

My levain is fed with a 1-3-3 ratio (usually 20g of levain, 60g water and 60g whole wheat). Usually I make the poolish the night before baking, in the counter, and it sits the whole next day in the fridge (I work all day, so nightime is where the magic happens here). After the autolyse stage, I added the water part II (see recepie in the website), salt and dry figs (60g) along with brazil`s nuts grinded in a food processor (30g).

I pre-heat my oven 1 hour before bake time. The bread goes to the oven inside an old oval shaped cast iron casserole (see pictures below), 30min with lid on and another 5-7min without it. Inside my oven theres a piece of soapstone that I use as a base for the cast iron.

Here it goes:

 

 

Cheers!!

 

 

 

 

dosco's picture
dosco

"More than 15 but less than 30" Ingredient Sourdough (Based on BBA Basic Sourdough)

I was intrigued by dabrownman's "more than 15 but less than 30 ingredient challenge" so I decided to give it a try by modifying Reinhart's BBA Basic Sourdough. I bought a package of Bob's Red Mill Whole Grain 10 Grain Hot Cereal, which appears to be coarsely milled whole grains, and chose to substitute 5 oz of starter with 5 oz of dry whole grain (Reinhart's recipe calls for 10.2 oz of preferment, in this bread I used about half as much). I made a bit of a mistake here as I added enough water to soak the grain overnight which totaled 7 oz of water ... my intention was an 82% hydration loaf using 100% hydration preferment and soaker but it's pretty obvious the soaker exceeded 100%.

100% hydration preferment (I did it in 2 builds, first build was 50 g water and 50g flours, second build was 100g water and 100g flours):

KAF Bread Flour

KAF White Whole Wheat

Arrowhead Mills Rye flour

Mature starter

Water

 

Main dough:

KAF Bread flour: 8 oz

KAF White Whole Wheat: 6.25 oz

KAF AP: 1 oz (I intended to use more but the bag ran dry)

Arrowhead Mills Sprouted Wheat Flour: 2.5 oz

Arrowhead Mills Rye Flour: 2.5 oz

Whole grain soaker: 12oz

(the whole grain cereal I used for the soaker is whole wheat, whole rye, corn grits, whole triticale, whole oats, soybeans, whole millet, whole barley, whole brown rice, oat bran, and flax meal ... it was 5 oz of the dry cereal and 7 oz water)

Salt: 0.6 oz Pink Himalayan

For the fluid I used Flying Dog "The Truth" Imperial IPA (12 oz) and 5.5 oz of additional water.

I autolysed the flour overnight for 12 hours, then added the salt, soaker, and preferment.

I mixed the mess with my Kitchen Aid using the dough hook ... then proceeded to knead in 5 minute intervals with 10 minute rests in between each interval. I let it sit out of 2 hours at room temp, then let it ferment in the coldest room in my house (about 55dF) for 5 hours, then into the refrigerator overnight. I preshaped it in the morning and then put it back int eh fridge ... it was very wet and sticky but I was able to stretch it and form a boule. Back into the refrigerator for 8 hours. Then for the final shaping I gently stretched it and formed into a boule, then into the brotform ... then into my utility closet (90dF) for 1.5 hours for final proofing.

I preheated my DO to 550dF and put the dough in and lightly scored it. After 5 minutes in the oven I reduced the temperature to 515dF and baked another 10 minutes. I then removed the bread from the DO and put it on the baking stone, and reduced the temperature again to 475dF. After 15 minutes I measured the internal temperature which read 195dF, so I left the bread in the oven for another 10 minutes ... at this point it was pretty dark so I removed it from the oven.

Crumb shots later, unless my wife decides to give the bread away, lol.

-Dave

 

EDIT: I couldn't wait so I lopped a slice off a few minutes ago. I'm pleased with the crumb. I think some of the hops came through, the outer crust is a touch on the bitter side. The crumb is moist, likely from the corn, and was delicious with butter. Will be interesting to observe the flavor as the loaf ages.

Skibum's picture
Skibum

Raspberry, blueberry, poppy seed muffins and other bakes

Breakfast this morning: raspberry, blueberry poppy seed muffins. Mix the wet and dry ingredients separately then combine. Gently fold in the blueberries. Fill prepared muffin tins half way, then press a whole, large raspberry in the center and fill up the tins. Bake @ 400F for 20 minutes turning at the half. Enjoy!!!

 Super easy:

1 cup flour

6 Tbs sugar

2 Tbs poppy seeds

1 t baking pow

1/2 t baking soda

1/2 t salt

1 egg

1/2 cup raspberry yogurt

2 Tbs canola oil

1 t lemon extract

3/4 - 1 cup blueberries

6 large raspberries.

Home baked goodness!!!

Here is yet another take on Norm's onion buns where Brian uses 2 Tbs dehydrated onion flakes and 1 Tbs garlic flakes to season the water and provide the topping. I love these buns and am still amazed at the volume I am getting from a pound of flour! 

Happy baking folks! Brian

jen lynch's picture
jen lynch

Low FODMAP breadmaking

Just when you thought dietary preferences couldn't get any more high-maintenance . . . My husband started a low-FODMAP diet a few months ago.  It is sort of the latest dietary crazy BUT he has suffered from IBS all his life and had terrible cramps and he feels 100 percent better following this.  FODMAPS are a group of carbohydrates some people have difficulty digesting . . . they are not proteins or oils . . . so gluten is NOT a FODMAP but wheat, spelt, barley, rye, kamut are.  Oats and amaranth have moderate amounts.  There are a whole bunch of other foods that are high in FODMAPS that need to be avoided--many of them find their way into GF FOODS (bean flours, dry milk, agave, chicory, garlic, etc).

So this is my question:  I want to add gluten to a GF flour but I am not entirely sure how to substitute or what to expect.  I was watching the Breadtopia sourdough starter video earlier and he mentioned rice flour not being as absorbent. Any idea what would be the best flour to do this with?  Also, I found David's reply on a different thread and that is exactly what I was thinking but I am still unsure and wondering if anyone has tried this or what other modifications I should probably make.

 

Well, you could use some wheat free/ gluten free flour, and add the gluten back in with Vital Wheat Gluten. Technically, you'd be getting a tiny amount of wheat. But you'd be getting a large amount of gluten highly concentrated, so it wouldn't take much added to the recipe to do the trick. The VWG I have is 8g protein in every 12g of the powder. If you mixed 25g of that VWG for every 100g GF flour, you'd have about as much gluten as a decent white bread flour. A good loaf could possibly be made of maybe 400g GF flour, 300g water, 100g VWG, and half a packet of yeast. You could do the same with any flour you want to try to use, I guess. It stands to reason you may have to knead a little more to make sure all the gluten is well distributed and well developed throughout the loaf, since it isn't an integral part of the flour. Bake at maybe 350F to 375F for about 35 to 40 minutes for a soft pan loaf. Higher temp and steam for a crusty boule. If you really want a crusty boule, batard, or baguette, you should also use more water to make up for the higher heat.

 

Any help or suggestions would be very helpful .

 

BTW, the low FODMAP diet sounds weird and very draconian but after a while you are supposed to start to try out different foods to see which ones are tolerable and which ones really cause problems.  Spelt sourdough is supposedly low FODMAP and tolderable (because of the fermentation) but that is a couple of weeks away.

Bröterich's picture
Bröterich

Dunkles Bauernbrot (dark farmer's bread)

I tried this recipe yesterday which I found on the popular German site Pötzblog (http://www.ploetzblog.de/2014/08/02/leserwunsch-dunkles-bauernbrot-no-knead/),

essentially a sourdough wheat/rye mix. The author says it is one most of the most read recipes.

I made 2 loaves one in the dutch oven the other one a cloche. I was very pleasantly surprised.

My wife and I ate almost half of a loaf this morning for breakfast.

Tom.

Philip Gregory's picture
Philip Gregory

Slow-doughn (slow-down) sourdough...

Hey bakers, friends!

 

You guys have been great to me. This picture is just my second attempt at sourdough in the dutch oven. It works wonders for me and my family. Too much bread... is there such a thing?

 

I am about three weeks in to a sourdough frenzy. My starters are just about that old (three weeks), and I'm making sourdough bread for friends, for family, for co-workers and for dogs. Whoops!!! Someone left the bread out on the counter and maybe our puppy a very happy puppy.

 

ANyway, to the point! I have questions. Lot's of them. Currently I am without a scale which is fun but, can be a challenge. Also, my kitchen is often times below 60 F (it's one of those old-fashion basement kitchens complete with cold stone and unsealed corners). The winter draft has actually created the perfect environment for my bread making. Everything is moving slower, the dough is always cold until it hits the bottom of the dutch oven, and I realize that this variable will not hold up for long. Soon (hopefully) the house will be warm and my process will have to adapt.

 

The question I want to ask now, considering this cold-kitchen environment, is how can I use it to my advantage?

Is there anyone out there who has experimented with using less sourdough starter and allowing for a longer fermentation?

For example, I use about 1 cup of starter to 3 cups of bread flour (no scale yet, sorry) for a loaf of bread. Does anyone have any experience, perhaps, using less sourdough starter (making up for the weight with more flour/water) to achieve a longer, slower fermentation period?

I generally autolyse flour, water and starter for 1.5 hrs in my cool kitchen.

Then, sprinkle salt and start with stretch and folds (S&F) once when I add the salt, then two more times at 45min-1hr intervals (if I have the patience). 

After my 3rd S&F I usually transfer the dough to a lightly oiled  casserole dish so it can sort of spread and relax. By this time, anywhere from 3 to 4 hrs has passed. When the dough looks happy and rested, maybe 1/2hr or 1hr later (remember this is a cold kitchen, so I am going by observation) I will pick up the dough and set it on the counter. (Total elapsed time: 4.5 to 5 hrs) I do a careful stretch and fold, no pushing on the dough or pressure then flip it so the seam side is down and let rest for another 1/2hr. then I sprinkle a little flour on top and around the sides (very little flour, just enough to release some stick) and with my scraper, I slide it into the dough, working quickly, all around the dough. It's hard to describe what it is that i do, but basically the scraper shapes the dough for me instead of me doing it because my hands are too rough. Then this shaping rests for a 1/2hr, and then I will do the same thing: a little flour dusting and the scraper motion to create a nice and taught Boule shape then i flip it onto my hands and drop it inverted, bottoms up, into a proofing basket. I let proof (all the while, the dough has been in the same cold kitchen) for anywhere from 1-2hrs. In the mean time i will do a dance, a little jig, and preheat the oven and dutch oven.

In conclusion, the time that has elapsed from when i mixed the autolyse to final proof ready to bake, it has been about 8hrs at a consistently chilly temperature. 

 

So... I don't find that the bread has over-proofed or under-fermented for that matter. The crust and crumb have been very satisfactory. The taste is slightly sour. Obviously, my starter needs to mature more, etc.

 

My inquiry is this: Can I use less starter in my dough and make up for it by allowing longer fermentation and proofing ? Does the sourdough starter work like that, or is there a certain percentage of starter you need to create a good bread. The extreme being: 2 tablespoons of starter to one loaf of bread, in which case the fermentation period would be a lot longer... Does this make sense? Does anyone have answers, comments, unrelated suggestions to the process I explained above...

Thanks guys, sorry for the long-winded post.

surefoot's picture
surefoot

Bottom of bread bakes faster in gas oven

Hello,

I need tips and advice in baking in my gas oven. Any bread or cake that I bake on the middle rack gets baked faster at bottom whereas the top is a pale brown. It also tastes slightly uncooked. :(

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Lucy Takes Another Shot at Not So Tzitzel Like Sprouted Rye

We baked a version of rye bread called Lucy’s Sorta Tzitzel back in the middle of August and it turned out to be one of the very best rye breads we have made to date – found here.

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/39721/lucy%E2%80%99s-sorta-tzitzel-sprouted-sourdough

 

So naturally, Lucy wanted to try and mess with it and see if she could improve on it somehow to make it more Tzitzelish.  She dropped the whole grains to 40% from 60% but made them all sprouted rye instead of equal amounts of rye and wheat with only half of them sprouted.   Tzitzel doesn’t have any sprouted grains in it but, since sprouted grain taste so much better, Lucy says –why not?

 

Lucy remembered to use some corn meal on the crust this time which is traditional and shaped the bread into an oval shape which is closer to the traditional batard than a boule.   She also upped the bread spices considerably to get closer to the traditional rye.   She also used some barley malt syrup this time in place of the red malt which would get a bit closer to traditional rye bread.

 

She also decided to up the hydration this time even though the last Tzitzel Like bake had 50% more whole grains and came out perfect.  Hey, she won’t listen to me about the hydration anyway so I just go with the flow which in this case was a sticky, sloppy mess that never stopped sticking to the counter until the end of the 3rd set of slap and folds. 

 

She strayed from tradition by using a New Belgium porter from Fort Collins, CO for all of the dough liquid.  As far as the process goes, we followed the previous Tzitzel bake with the exception that the long cold retard was reduced to 16 from 20 and the dough was allowed to proof on the counter for 3 hours on a heating pad before Big Old Betsy was fired up to ramming speed.

 

We slashed the oval more traditionally than the T-Rex we used the last time and  we also decided to bake under the Magnalite turkey roster bottom, used as a cloche, instead of using Mega Steam which is much more work than we wanted to expend today. 

 

What is better than LA red hot tamale and chicken taco?August was hot, so the last rye bake really proofed well in the fridge but this one, in the AZ winter cold, just didn’t move along as fast.  In fact it hardly puffed itself up at all in the fridge.  Temperature really makes a huge difference in how bread ferments and proofs.  So we hoped our rule of: watching the dough instead of the clock would work out so that all would be fine in the end.

 

We are really starting to get into home made fresh noodles,  can trailrunner's SD ones be far behind?  This bread baked up nice and brown, sprang and bloomed well enough and smelled teriffic as it baked - must have been the bread spices.

 

Can't wait to see the crumb    The crumb came out soft, moist and fairly open for a bread of this type. The best part was that this bread has outstanding flavor.  This isn't your 'everyday Jewish Deli Rye.    This is an assertive rye that belies its tiny amount of rye in the mix.  Those of you that don't like bread spices might want to cut them by a third or half..  Adding in some reconstituted dries mined onion would be a fine addition to this sour rye bread.  The porter just made everything a little more complex to the palate.  This is the best JDR bread we have ever made but it could be better. 

SD Levain Build

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

10 Week Retarded Rye Sour Starter

8

0

0

8

1.42%

27% Extraction Sprouted Rye

8

17

34

59

10.44%

Water

8

17

34

59

10.44%

Total

24

34

68

126

22.30%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain Totals

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

63

11.15%

 

 

 

Water

63

11.15%

 

 

 

Levain Hydration

100.00%

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total Flour

11.15%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

72% Extraction Sprouted Rye

162

28.67%

 

 

 

KA Bread & La Fama AP 50/50

340

60.18%

 

 

 

Total Dough Flour

502

88.85%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

11

1.95%

 

 

 

New BelgiumPortage Porter 340

355

62.83%

 

 

 

Bread Spices

20

3.54%

 

 

 

Barley Malt Syrup

22

3.89%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

70.72%

 

 

 

 

Total Flour w/ Starter

565

 

 

 

 

Tot. New BelgiumPortage Porter 355 & Water

418

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Hydration w/ Starter & Adds

76.71%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

1,036

 

 

 

 

% Whole Sprouted Rye

39.82%

 

 

 

 

Bread spices include 10 g Caraway & 10 g  Anise, Corriander & Fennel

And Lucy reminds us not to forget the salad 

 

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