The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

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dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Make your own Greek yogurt

Make your own Greek yogurt and then use the drippings to make great bread by substituting the yogurt whey water for the water in your bread.

Juergen Krauss's picture
Juergen Krauss

The Dark Side Attacks: 70% rye plus wheat / emmer / spelt

Mischbrot variations

In earlier experiments with breads having a higher percentage of rye flour I found that adding spelt, emmer or semolina complemented the rye very well.

With this bake I wanted to compare the effect of substituting the wheat part with emmer and spelt in breads with 70% rye. The flours are all from Shipton Mill.

The outcome:



I used my tried and tested Mischbrot formula as a base, this time using a rye starter with 100% hydration. The starter is made with dark rye, while the remaining rye in the formula is light rye.

Here the formula:

Straight formula

Percent

Amount(g)

Amount (oz)

Dark Rye

24

108

3.83

Light Rye

46

208

7.33

Bread flour

30

136

4.78

Or light spelt flour

30

136

4.78

Or wholegrain emmer flour

30

136

4.78

salt

2

9

0.32

water

75

339

11.96

yield

177

800

28.22

 

 

 

 

Rye sour

 

 

 

Dark rye flour

24

108

3.83

Water

24

108

3.83

Mature starter

2.4

11

0.38

Yield

50.4

227

8.04

 

 

 

 

Dough

 

 

 

Light Rye

46

208

7.33

Bread flour

30

136

4.78

Or light spelt flour

30

136

4.78

Or wholegrain emmer flour

30

136

4.78

Salt

2

9

0.32

Water

51

231

8.13

Rye sour

48

217

7.65

Yield

177

800

28.22

At the current cooler temperatures (about 23C / 73F in my kitchen) the starter took 16 hours to mature.
With 70% rye the doughs / pastes are very sticky and require only a short mix/knead so that all materials are mixed well.

After 100 minutes of fermentation at 23C / 73F I shaped rounds with very wet hands (in mid-air), and put t hem into baskets (floured with light rye) for the final rest..After 60 minutes the rounds showed cracks, a sign that they are ready for the bake.

The bake (on a stone, with steam) started at maximum temperature (ca.  240C / 464F), after 15 minutes I turned the loaves and lowered the temperature to 210C / 410F, After another 20 minutes the bread was ready.

I am very happy with oven spring and bloom. All three breads performed equally well and were indistinguishable from the outside.

After a day I cut into the loaves. The crumb is quite similar in all three loaves, the bread containing wholegrain emmer  is a bit darker and more dense.(The wheat bread got a bit of a shadow - bad photography!)

Although the crumb looks fairly dense, the breads actually feel light.

The crust could be thicker, but that's my oven – not much I can do about this at the moment.

The taste of the three breads is also very similar – quite complex with rye dominating, and a distinctive tangy after-taste. The emmer bread has the most complex taste.

There are a few things I would like to try with this formula:
1. using all wholegrain flours
2. going back to the original German way: using all medium rye and refined flours (which would be called ”Berliner Landbrot”)
3. Reducing the amount of rye sour and using some of the wheat/emmer/spelt in a stiff starter as a second preferment
4. using a wheat/emmer/spelt poolish as a second preferment
5. adding spices

Lots to do!
Juergen

JoeV's picture
JoeV

Sourdough Whole Wheat No-knead Cinnamon bread

I had a taste for cinnamon bread, and I had just finished a two-day feeding of my starter. So I just improvised a little from the standard no-knead formula and came up with this handsome fellow. The smell was magnificent as it was baking, and this loaf had an 18 hour fermentation.

Baked in my oblong cloche

11 oz. All purpose flour

5 oz. Stone ground whole wheat flour
1/2 C Cinnamon chips (you can add up to another 1/2C, but no less)
1-1/2 t Kosher salt
1/2 C Sourdough starter (vibrant)
14 oz. Purified water at room temperature

Blend starter with water until all you have is milky colored water, then mix everything together as you normally would. Allow to ferment on the counter for 12-18 hours before shaping.

No-knead directions for beginners avsailable on my website at http://flyfishohio.us/NoKneadBread.htm

 

ananda's picture
ananda

Borodinsky using the Auerman Process

Borodinsky using the Auerman Process

Late last week a package arrived for me in the post from Faith, who posts here at TFL.   She had been on a visit to Russia and brought back a tub of Red Rye Malt for both Daisy_A and one for me.

My wife, Alison went out of her way yesterday to buy some Blackstrap Molasses for me to enable me to bake a Borodinsky loaf today.

Here is the detail and formula.

Rye Sour build:

Day/Time

Stock

D Rye

Water

TOTAL

Monday 08:00

64

300

500

864

 

Material/Stage

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1a] Rye Sourdough

 

 

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

30

300

Water

50

500

TOTAL

80

800

 

 

 

1b] “Scald”

 

 

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

15

150

Red Rye Malt

5

50

Blackstrap Molasses

6

60

Crushed Coriander Seeds

1

10

Boiling Water

35

350

TOTAL

62

620

 

 

 

2. “Sponge”

 

 

Rye Sourdough [from 1a]

80

800

“Scald” [from 1b]

62

620

TOTAL

142

1420

 

 

 

3. Final Paste

 

 

“Sponge” [from 2]

142

1420

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

25

250

Marriage’s Organic Strong White flour

25

250

Salt

1.2

12

TOTAL

193.2

1932

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

30 + 20 = 50

-

% overall hydration

85

-

% wholegrain flour

75

-

FACTOR

10

-

 

Method:

  • Build the sourdough as described above.   Make the “scald” as follows:   crush the coriander and add it to the red rye malt and dark rye flour.   Weigh the molasses into a pan, add water and bring to a rolling boil.   Tip this onto the flour mix, and add any extra boiling water if there is evaporation.   Stir well to ensure full gelatinisation.   Cover and cool.
  • Once sufficiently cool, add the scald to the sour to make the sponge.   Cover and leave to ferment for 6 hours.
  • For the final paste combine the sponge with remaining flour and the salt, mix with the paddle beater in an upright machine, 2 minutes on first speed and 2 minutes on second speed.   Scrape down the bowl to ensure thorough mixing.
  • Bulk proof for 1 hour with DDT at 25 - 27°C.
  • Shape into a large Pullman Pan, prepared with lining of butter and coating of rye flour.   Smooth off and top with freshly crushed Coriander seeds.
  • Final proof for just 1 hour at 27°C, then bake.
  • Pre-heat the oven to 280°C.   Load the pan, apply steam, and turn the oven down to 100°C.   Keep a supply of steam in the oven and bake for a total of 4½ hours.
  • Cool on wires; wrap in linen and leave 24 hours before cutting into the bread.

CHOCOLATE, dark chocolate!

 

Alison’s massage therapist left half an hour ago, and bought half of this loaf.   I’m celebrating as it means I got to capture a crumb shot, and to taste a lovely thin slice too, all on its own.   Sourness and bitterness, but also just enough sweetness too from the malt.   It’s dark, dark like chocolate, and the spicy coriander is very pronounced …Taste!

All good wishes

Andy

Matt Edy's picture
Matt Edy

Egg substitute in sweet bun dough

Wondered if anyone knew of a substitute for eggs in a sweet bun dough (for hot cross buns)?

Finding that eggs in dough cause the bread to dry up and go hard very quick....

Many thanks

 

Graid's picture
Graid

What sort of rye is this and how would I achieve it?

I was until recently under the mistaken impression that all rye bread was the sort you get in supermarkets in the UK and Belgium and Sweden. Small, dense, dark, and exceedingly rich in flavour.

This is the picture of the common UK brand. Like in Belgium and Sweden it is sold in the UK in pre-sliced form. The texture is crumbly and the bread has a habit of falling in half when you take the slices out. 

Ingredients: Cereal (Rye Wholemeal, Whole Grain Rye Flour), Water, Natural Sourdough (Wholegrain Rye Meal, Water), Sea Salt.

I followed a 'deli style rye' recipe from the American artisan bread in 5 minutes book, and was rather surprised that it produced a nice tasting loaf but decidedly unlike the sort of 'rye' I have been wanting. Really quite light in colour, and far more subtle in flavour. Ignorant of me perhaps, but it was news to me that when recipes from other countries say 'rye' they don't necessarily mean the very dark bread I'm used to. 

Is it a 'dark rye' that this sort is called, or is it something more like pumpernickel, does anyone know? I notice the tendency of such loaves to be made in Germany- is this a specifically German style of rye bread?

Is regular rye flour different from the wholemeal and whole grain rye flour mentioned in the ingredients? The rye flour I have been using is unbranded stuff from my local health food store, so I am uncertain of the type, but it looks quite fine. 

Any advice would be appreciated on unravelling the mysteries of rye varieties.

3 Olives's picture
3 Olives

Keeping Chocolate Chip Cookies from Spreading and Chip Recommendations

I've been using the Toll House recipe for years and the cookies always taste great. They spread more than I like but that's a visual issue and doesn't effect the taste. I'm making some cookies as a gift and I'd like them to be a bit plumper.  Will chilling the dough decrease the spreading?

Also, any chocolate chip recommendations would be appreciated.

Bread Head's picture
Bread Head

Help making the No Knead Pizza on Fibrement stone

I am getting stuck at some parts of this process so here are some questions;

-Ingredients

400grams Organic King Aurthur Flour

320grams of cool water (55 to 65 degrees)

1 1/4 teaspoon of Iodine Sea Salt

1/4 teaspoon of SAF dry yeast

1/2 teaspoon organic florida cane sugar

2 tablespoons of olive oil

 

Let ferment for 18 to 20 hours

After I dump out and cut dough in half I am not sure how to shape into balls because the dough is so sticky?

After I get two shaped balls (with a lot of flour and I don't know what technique) then what?

Should I place in the refridgerator? This time I am letting the two dough balls rise on the counter for 2 hours and then I will refrigerate for a day or days.

When I pull a dough ball out of the refrigerator to make a pizza, should I let it sit for 1 to 2 hour to warm up or should I work it into a pie shape while it is cold?

Where should the placement of the fibrement stone be?  Top, middle, or bottom?  (I like the idea of the top because of less head room)

Thanks for your help!

 

bobku's picture
bobku

Onion Toppings always burn

How can I stop onion toppings on my bagels from burning. I rehydrate minced onions in boiling water let them sit for a while drain them and place on top of bagel. but they still burn  Should I refrigerate or freeze them. Or maybe its the brand I buy, I just can seem to stop them from burning

shelstaj's picture
shelstaj

croissant journey

Hello fellow bakers! 

Ive been a fan on The Fresh Loaf for quite some time, and finally have decided to start posting some stuff!

I have been working in restaurants the last 2 1/2 years, the last year in pastry/bakeries. I currently work at a small startup bakery in San Francisco.  we are working on croissants at the moment, ive been practicing given that they are one of my favorite things to eat! I am relatively new to yeasted doughs, so here are some of the test runs so far!  

Ive started with the Pierre Herme base recipe and have been playing around with it.

the recipe calls for fresh yeast and ive been currently playing with fresh yeast vs osmotolerant yeast. The recipe also calls for the dough to be mixed, then left to rest for 24 hours in the fridge. I am currently trying to do bulk fermentation in hopes to avoid the 24 hours in the fridge enabling me to produce the croissants from mix to shape within a 8-10 hour shift.

here are the results between 2 of my recent batches. 

My current issues are that im looking for more of a crack and flake  as well as a bit more volume. ill be sure and snap some more pictures, i just mixed 2 batches earlier today which i am going to laminate and shape tonight! results to be posted soon! 

heres a picture of fresh yeast. the dough was mixed just to combine, then left to rest for 24 hours in the fridge before starting lamination.

 

here are pics from a batch which i used osmotolerant yeast , did a bulk fermentation for 1 hour, till the dough was about double in size, then punched it down, let chill in fridge then started lamination. 

 

 

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