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golgi70's picture
golgi70

Farmer's Market Season Baking

I've put myself to the test.  I plan to summon 10 loaves of my own at home, freshly baked, every Saturday Morning, to bring to my local farmer's market as trade. This is week one for me.  As some already know I am a full time professional baker and believe it or not the last thing I want to do on the weekend  is bake. Actually as I've aged I prefer to cook opposed to bake on my free time.  I used to bake at home endlessly but with a full time job doing such that teetered off.  I'm back.  I see all of the wonderful stuff created from home on this site, much of which blows away professionally made product.  I want in.  I'm gonna be a part-time home baker.  I bet I'll need some advice from those of you with more skills baking bread in rinky dink home ovens with pots and pans and the such.  I've done it and done it well but I'm only a novice.  Most of my breadwork is with commerical tools, and in some cases top notch.  

Also my plan is to be spontaneous and just kinda wing a new loaf every week.  This week I've made up what I'll call the "Super Grain Sour Wheat"  I did some reading on super grains this week and thought well those should be a soaker for a loaf of bread.  So I made a levain of Central Milling High Mountain High Protein, Central Mill freshly ground whole wheat, Central Milling freshly ground whole rye, starter, and h20.  This was built off of a 100% cold living white starter and essentially a second build 8 hours after it was previously fed 1:2::2. 

Soaker:

3 oz toasted millet 3 oz, toasted buckwheat (kashi), 3 oz toasted kamut, 3 oz toasted quinoa

Levain

3 oz Rye

7 oz Wheat

10 oz HP

20 oz H20

10 oz White Starter 100%

--------------------------------------------------------------

Rise 8 hours.  

 

Final Dough

85 oz HP

20 oz Wheat

70 oz H20

3 oz  Sea Salt

4 oz  H20 #2

----------------------------------------------------------------

Autolyse 2 hours 

Add levain, salt, soaker and mix on speed one (uh oh super wet) 5 minutes

Turn to speed 2 (medium)  5 minutes (looking better)

Turn to speed 3 hi about 5 minutes (phew it came together)

Bulk Ferment plan: 3 1/2 hours (3-4 s+f) at 20 minutes intervals but I'll let the dough lead

Shape/ partially proof (2-3 hours) Retard overnight

Wake up early set up my oven and bake in 3-4 waves.   cool down. make sure its not terrible and then head to market

I'll add some pics of dough and the such as I go.  

I'm mostly sharing this to motivate me to do this and to document some of my findings.  Hey I bet I'll make a few good loaves before the markets over in November.  

 

Happy Baking

Josh

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

YW & Poolish Hot Dog Buns

With Memorial Day neigh, we needed some hot dog buns for some sausages and brats we will start the weekend off with tonight for dinner.   Who better to come up with a recipe for them than none other than our resident Hot Dog and my German baking Apprentice - Lucy!

 

She got in the mood doing slap and folds for the Japanese Black Rice bread earlier today while singing her favorite Japanese cowboy song -  ‘Yippee Oh Kiyae, I am a Japanese Hot Dog, Bun Making Sandman.’  Yes, it is even truer that she got into this song more doggedly while doing the slap and folds for these buns.  She is incorrigible.

 

 In any event, we made a poolish and YW levain over 12 hours.   After a short 1 hour autolyse, we mixed it all together, did the singing, slapping and folding over 10 minutes and then let the dough rest for 15 minutes before doing the first of 3 sets of S& F’s in the bowl.

 

After a 30 minute rest we shaped the dough into 5 tight little logs a spiral bun and a Franz Joseph roll just in case a hamburger happened onto the gill with the Hot Dogs over the weekend.   After proofing for an hour and a half on parchment paper laid out over a plastic cutting board substituting for a peel, we thought they looked fairly proofed.

 

The oven was already hot from the Japanese Black Rice bread so all we had to do was reconstitute the lava rock and CI skillet steam and get to baking.  The rolls, after egg washing, went in at 400 F for 2 minutes and then 6 minutes at 375 F before removing the steam.  We then turned the oven down to 350 F convection this time and baked the rolls for an additional 12 minutes while rotating them on the stone every 5 minutes,

 

After a total of 20 minutes, the rolls looked nice and brown so out they came to a cooling rack.  We brushed some milk on them to make sure that they crust would be soft as possible.   They puffed up beautifully in the oven and the Toadies really come through in the smell department.  Lucy can’t wait to eat these buns with a nice variety of sausages for dinner.  Will post a crumb shot then.

 

The nuns were very good and they worked out well even if a little on the large side - just more room for pickled, onions, cucumber and Hatch chilis.

Happy Memorial Weekend!

Love the left over toasted buns much better when steamed for lunch the next day!

Formula

YW & Poolish

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

Yeast Water

85

0

0

85

17.00%

Pinch of yeast

0

0

0

0

0.00%

AP

130

50

50

230

46.00%

Water

50

50

0

100

20.00%

Total

265

100

50

415

83.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

YW & Poolish

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

230

46.00%

 

 

 

Water

185

37.00%

 

 

 

Hydration

80.43%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

0

42.26%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

AP

270

54.00%

 

 

 

Dough Flour

270

54.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

9

1.80%

 

 

 

Water

81

16.20%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

30.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

500

100.00%

 

 

 

Water

266

 

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

53.20%

 

 

 

 

Whole Grain %

2.60%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

65.57%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

982

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

 

Egg

47

9.40%

 

 

 

Butter

42

8.40%

 

 

 

Non Fat Dry Milk Powder

25

5.00%

 

 

 

Cream Cheese

50

10.00%

 

 

 

White Rye Malt

3

0.60%

 

 

 

Toadies

10

2.00%

 

 

 

Honey

20

4.00%

 

 

 

VW Gluten

5

1.00%

 

 

 

Total

207

41.40%

 

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Multigrain SD with Japanese Black Rice, Seeds, Prunes & Dried Edamame

After Evon’s post of her bread with Japanese Black Rice in it, we knew it had to get to the top pf the bake list like Hanseata’s Wild Rice bread did when it appeared.  We had run across some of this rice a couple of months ago at Sprouts and had cooked it for dinner.  We knew it would end up in bread eventually and Evon’s post was the impetus.

 

The question was what kind of bread to put it in?  My apprentice went back and looked at our take of the Karin’s wonderful Wild Rice Bread and quickly knew that we would do something similar to it, perhaps not as dark or complicated.

 

Since I started medicating my apprentice with Sylvia’s Dog Bones, she isn’t as determined or anal as usual - even though she has taken to licking the glow in the dark, black light intensified picture we have of Elvis performing in Las Vagas.   Here was that bake:

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/28806/hanseata%E2%80%99s-wild-rice-sd-w-yeast-water-multi-seeds-prunes-beer-and-sprouts

Here is Karin’s original post :

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/24092/wild-rice-sourdough-bread-ended-cold-war

Here is Evon’s inspirational bake, if a little dark, : Sprouted Organic Wild Black Rice SD Bread

 

It isn’t often we have a new bread ingredient like Japanese Wild Rice but Evon’s bread also had edamame in it – a second ingredient we have never seen used in bread before.  And as luck would have it, we had 3 kinds of edamame in the pantry and freezer.  We had fresh shelled edamame in the freezer. Wasabi dried edamame (my favorite after a few beers) and regular dried edamame.

 

You can tell we eat it a lot around here since it is my daughter’s favorite veggie.  We decided to be our normal conservative self when it comes to baking, as opposed to my apprentice’s solution for cleaning tile grout or magnesium rims on fine, if old, motorcycles.  So, we went with the non Wasabi dried edamame even though the black rice is Japanese.  You just can’t make apprentice’s think after leading them to water.

 

We sprouted the black rice and thought we had killed it when we forgot it was soaking and let it go for 8 hours before draining and putting them between damp paper towels.   But the rice loved it and after 2 days had sprouted well.  My apprentice was especially thrilled since this was her first time sprouting any kind of rice.

 

We did the standard (3) 4 hour levain build by putting all of the whole multi-grains in the levain.  Since it was white flour in the dough, we autolysed it for 1 hour only with the VWG, Toadies, red and white malts.  Once the levain and autolyse came together we did 10 minutes of slap and folds.

My apprentice sang one of her favorite tunes while doing the S& F’s - an Oriental cowboy song called - ‘Yippee Oh Kiyae, I am a Japanese Hot Dog, Bun Making Sandman.’  I reminded her that we wouldn’t be making hot dog buns till later in the day but she was in the groove and just wouldn’t be stopped with her being a hot dog and Japanese rice in the mix.  I’m guessing it won’t be the last time I hear this odd tune today.

 

After a 15 minute rest we did 3 sets of S& F’s on 15 minute intervals and added the edamame, black rice sprouts, ground non aromatic and aromatic seed variety and prunes on the first set.  By the 3rd set they were well distributed.  After another 15 minute rest, we divided the dough in half, shaped each and placed them into rice floured baskets and then into used plastic trash can liners.

 

After a 30 minute rest on the counter the baskets were placed into the fridge for an 18 hour retard.  By the next morning they had risen well in the fridge.  They came out of the cold for one hours to warm up before we fired up Big Old Betsy with Sylvia’s and David’s Patented Steaming Combo.

 

It took 45 minutes for the oven to get to 500 F including the 20 minutes for the top and bottom stones to get to that temperature lagging 20 minute behind.  We really cut back on the rice flour this time and worried that the dough would stick to the baskets but they came out no worries after a rap on the parchment covered peel.  A quick slash and into the oven they went.

 

After 2 minutes of steam at 500 F we turned the oven down to 465 F for a further 10 minutes of steam.  After removing the steam, we turned the oven down to 450 F, convection this time and let the bread finish baking to 205 F on the inside while rotating the bread ever 5 minute on the stone.  Total baking time was 27 minutes with 15 of it without steam.

 

It browned up, bloomed out had a few blisters and an ear where we tried to get one.  I like the color of this bread and the pattern that the baskets put on them.  They smell like they will be tasty if not delicious.  Have to wait for the crumb shot till after lunch .

The crumb is soft, light, open and moist.  The taste is totally unique and unlike Hanseata's Wild Rice bread.   We really like this bread.  the dried edamame will be a routine bread ingrediant from now on - we love the mouth feel and taste of them in thsi bread very much.   We love rhe contrasting ncolors and textures of teh crumb - very appealing!  It is another fine bread of late and a shout out goes to Evon for her inspiration and fine post of her bread.  One more crumb picture for Lucy!

Formula

Whole Wheat and Rye Levain

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

WW and Rye Sour Starter

20

0

0

20

3.17%

Whole Wheat

15

15

15

45

7.14%

Spelt

0

15

15

30

4.76%

Rye

15

15

15

45

7.14%

Water

30

45

20

95

15.08%

Total

80

90

65

235

37.30%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain Totals

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

130

20.63%

 

 

 

Water

105

16.67%

 

 

 

Hydration

80.77%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

16.79%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

AP

500

79.37%

 

 

 

Dough Flour

500

79.37%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

11

1.75%

 

 

 

Water

382

60.63%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

76.40%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

630.0

100.00%

 

 

 

Water

487

 

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

77.30%

 

 

 

 

Whole Grain %

25.08%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

72.90%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

1,400

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

 

Toadies

20

3.17%

 

 

 

Prunes

72

11.43%

 

 

 

Red Rye Malt

4

0.63%

 

 

 

White Rye Malt

4

0.63%

 

 

 

Dried Edamame

35

5.56%

 

 

 

Ground Sesame & Flax Seeds

12

1.90%

 

 

 

Poppy Seeds

3

0.48%

 

 

 

Anise, Coriander, Caraway & Fennel

12

1.90%

 

 

 

VW Gluten

10

1.59%

 

 

 

Total

172

27.30%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sprouts

 

%

 

 

 

Japanese Back Rice

100

15.87%

 

 

 

Total Sprouts

100

15.87%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weight for Japanese Black Rice is the dry weight.

 

 

 

 

Juergen Krauss's picture
Juergen Krauss

My Current Projects: Gluten Free / Bread for a "Treasure Island" fair

At the moment I am pursuing two totally different themes in my baking: Gluten Free bread and bread for a school summer fair themed "Treasure Island".

This blog post is intended as a journal for my thoughts and ideas, nothing is final yet.

The photo above is my take on "Pease Bread", the 18th century wheat-free alternative. See below.

Let's start with Gluten Free (GF) bread:

After my initial success with a Buckwheat-Millet Sourdough I am aiming to understand more indepth how GF flours behave. I will be using Psyllium husks as a gelling agent, avoiding all processed ingredients like gums etc.

My plan is:

  1. To determine the optimum amount of Psyllium needed for several GF flours. I will use a 60:40 flour:starch mix and instant yeast for these experiments. I will aim to adjust hydration in a way that makes the doughs feel similar. 
  2. To determine the fermentability of the individual flours Plus Psyllium  using Raisin Yeast Water, Rye Sourdough and Yeast.
  3. To develop a reliable GF Starter
  4. To work on flour combinations and taste

This is a lot of work, but i am really excited to do this.

My spreadsheet (work in progress) is here:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AkcYHhPxccKtdG5aRV96RVY3TUkzdWM1R0tWcndmaXc&usp=sharing

/*  UPDATE */

Posted some photos of step 1 above: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/33651/some-gf-experiments

/* ************ */

Having spoken to several people with food allergies it is clear to me that it might be necessary to design a bread for an individual person and their specific sensitivities. 

A big Thank You to Gluten Free Gourmand and Laura T. for your inspirations:

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/32708/glutenfree-sourdough-progress

"Treasure Island" baking:

My son kindly volunteered me to have a bread stall at their school's summer fair. 

This fair is meant to be organised by the children, and the theme is "Treasure Island". 

It took me a few days to figure out what I could do within this frame of reference, and the pieces are starting to come together.

I looked into 18th century baking, and Andy (ananda) generously pointed me to an article about the history of flour usage in Britain.

I will have a group of children do most of the work on the day before the fair, using the school kitchen.

And this is what I intend to bake with them:

  1. Ships Biskets (Hardtack): the staple food of the sailors; this will be more for curiosity. Wholegrain Wheat flour 100%, Water 50%, Salt 2%, Mix until evenly hydrated, rest for 1 hour or so, shape flat palm-size biscuits 4oz each, dock, bake until completely dry, but not brown (I have to figure that one out). 4 of these was a sailor's daily ration.
  2. Pease Bread (see the picture at the top): The staple food of the very poor, or in times of bad wheat harvests.This is my take, quite tasty: Ground Haricot Beans: 30%, Ground Pearl Barley: 30%, Oatmeal 30%, Water 80%, Salt 2%, Rye Sour (100% HL) 20%. DT 28C. Bulk fermentation 2 hours, proof in basket 1 hour, long bake in falling oven.
  3. Maslin Bread: This would have been the staple bread of the lower classes in south England. My take on this: Wholegrain Rye: 50%, High Extraction Wheat: 50%, Water 75%, Salt 2% Rye Sour 20%. DT 28C. Bulk fermentation 2 hours, proof in basket 1 hour. Bake in falling oven starting hot.
  4. Manchet Bread: This is what the Squire, Doctor and Captain would have eaten. There are several historical recipes about, this is my first take. Everybody loved it: Stoneground White Strong flour: 100%, Water 54%, Salt 2%, Instant Yeast 0.7%. Mix, knead and beat the living daylights out of it with a rolling pin, until very silky. Get those carotenoids oxidized. They want WHITE bread!  Proof 2 hours. Shape into batard. Proof 40 minutes. Bake at 210C.

I will try out some other recipes for Manchet, and I intend to use ale barm - this afternoon I will pick up some from the brewery.

Here is a picture of Manchet and Maslin breads:

And here is a crumb shot of Maslin, Manchet and Pease Breads:

I am off to my kitchen now...

Cheers,

Juergen

isand66's picture
isand66

Hamburger and Super Size Hot Dog Buns

RollcloseupIt's Memorial Day this weekend believe it or not.  Doesn't feel like it's almost June, but it is certainly time to grill some hot dogs and hamburgers.  I hate using store-bought rolls since I know I can make ones myself that are far superior.

My wife insists that the only rolls worthy of using for hamburgers and hot dogs must be light white bread rolls.    I have been real busy at work so it's been difficult to find time to bake as much as I would like so a quick yeasted roll recipe would have to do.  With that in mind I adapted a recipe from Peter Reinhart's Artisan Breads Every Dayand added a few twists.

I decided to add some parmesan cheese powder and some dried chives just to make it a little interesting.

I used the overnight retardation method which helps build some extra flavor.

I must say that overall these came out nice and flavorful and were perfect for our hamburger and hot dog dinner the other day.

Hamburger-and-Hotdog-Rolls

RolllsGroup

Directions

Mix flours with yeast to combine.  Next add remainder of the ingredients keeping about 30 grams of milk back.  Mix on low-speed or by hand for 1 minute and let the dough rest for 5-10 minutes to absorb the flour.

Add the balance of the water if needed and mix for another 4 minutes.  The dough should come together and be scraping the side of the mixing bowl and be nice and fairly smooth but still tacky.

Remove the dough to your work surface and knead by hand for 1 minute.  Do about 3-4 stretch and folds and put in a well oiled bowl or container with a cover.  Put it in your refrigerator immediately.

You can keep it in your refrigerator for about 24 to 36 hours.  I ended up baking it in the morning so it was only in my refrigerator for around 14 -15 hours.   The dough should double while in the refrigerator.

When ready to bake the rolls or bread, take it out of the refrigerator and immediately weigh out your pieces or loaves and shape as desired.  I made simple round rolls and some hot dog buns.  I think it is time for me to buy a hot dog pan since I can't seem to get the size right and ended up with gigantic size hot dog rolls.  Next, let them rise for 1 hour on a cookie sheet with parchment paper.

After 45 minutes turn your oven up to 350 degrees F. and prepare your rolls as desired.  I beat 1 whole egg mixed with a little water and put an egg wash on each roll.  At the 1 hour or so mark pop them in the oven with steam and turn once after about 15 minutes.  These should take about 25 minutes to cook thoroughly.

Let them cool on wire rack for at least half an hour before digging in if you can wait that long.

Crumb-Shot

BNLeuck's picture
BNLeuck

New multigrain bread recipe... double check me?

I'm too lazy to search for a recipe among the myriad thousands out there for one that most closely resembles what I want, but apparently not too lazy to work on my baker's percentages. Weird, I know, but I'm a weird person. Will those with some knowledge of sandwich breads and baker's percentages please look this over to make sure I haven't made some glaring error? I haven't worked with BPs in a long while, or done any more complicated a bread recipe than a standard white rustic loaf in over a year without pulling it straight from a book, so I could have gone horribly wrong somewhere.

 

Revised:
TWO 8.5x4in LOAVES
*************************
bread flour 50%
rye flour 40%
rolled oats 10%
FLOUR WEIGHT: 100% 700g

nonfat dry milk 5% 35g
molasses 5% 35g
honey 5% 35g
butter 5% 35g
ground flax 2% 14g
salt 2% 14g
yeast 2% 14g
ADDITIONALS WEIGHT: 26% 182g

water 70% 490g
HYDRATION

TOTAL WEIGHT: 1372g

 

TWO 9x5in LOAVES
*************************
bread flour 50%
rye flour 40%
rolled oats 10%
FLOUR WEIGHT: 100% 910g

nonfat dry milk 5% 45g
molasses 5% 45g
honey 5% 45g
butter 5% 45g
ground flax 2% 18g
salt 2% 18g
yeast 2% 18g
ADDITIONALS WEIGHT: 26% 234g

water 70% 637g
HYDRATION

TOTAL WEIGHT: 1781g

 

My plan runs somewhat along the lines of KAF's oatmeal sandwich bread, using hot water to soften the oats, incorporate the stickies (honey and molasses), the butter, and the salt. Once lukewarm I'd add the NF dry milk, as it does not mix in well when the water is hot. The flours, flax, and yeast (I use instant) will be combined. But here is where I wonder... should I mix the remaining water with the dry mix to develop some gluten before adding in the enrichment elements, or incorporate the oat mix first? At 65% (now 70%) hydration, I don't worry about over hydrating, so I'd use all the reserved water. Or does it really matter? I have had trouble in the past developing gluten in enriched doughs, which is why I ask. Any and all thoughts on the proposed recipe are welcome!

EDIT: Taken from comments below, I have corrected my typo (oops!), will autolyse, and upped the hydration. I am baking a test batch to see if this works out like I see in my head, and will update this post accordingly. Now, just to find the time to do so... hmm...

varda's picture
varda

Almost Whole Wheat Pain de Mie

Recently I posted on a bake of Syd's Asian style pain de mie, and Janet commented that she was going to make it with her white whole wheat home milled flour.   I decided to try something similar.    Instead of white whole wheat, I used my golden flour which is home milled hard red whole wheat with some of the bran and some coarse flour sifted out.    I believe the closest official name to this would be high extraction flour, probably around 90%.

I followed the original formula with the following changes:

-Added a bit more milk in the biga

-Used golden flour in the biga and final dough but not the Tang Zhong

-Added a bit more milk and egg in the final dough

During the intensive mix of the final dough, it acted quite different than the original.   It started out with the consistency of pudding, and stayed that way for quite awhile.   I put it in my Bosch Compact at speed 4 and mixed a long time.   Finally, getting bored, I walked away.   When I came back, the dough had changed and started to lighten and come together elastically.    I let it go for awhile longer, and finallly, when it was still spreading out irregularly but was clearly an elasticized mass, stopped.   Possibly 45 minutes?   I'm not sure, as I wasn't watching the clock.  The dough was still more liquid than solid.   When I took the dough off the hook, it poured slowly down, but sheeted out into an impossibly thin membrane without tearing.  

When it came time to shape, the dough was not as manageable as the white version, but still shaped fairly nicely.    The surface was bubbling up a bit, which I figured would mean a more open crumb - not the desirable thing for this kind of bread per Syd.   

The upshot?   A bread that is just as decadently delicious as its predecessor, with the added whole wheat flavor.   Healthier?   I let you be the judge.

The crumb?   Nothing much to look at.  Just whole wheaty sandwichy.

But try this with your basic whole wheat sandwich bread:

Inadvertently perhaps, I made some changes to the method:  I've been baking a lot of challah so I ended up following times and temps for challah.   In Syd's version bulk ferment is only 30 minutes, and bake temperature is 350 instead of 375.

Formula and method:

 

Final

Biga

Tang Zhong

Total

BP

Golden

100

233

 

333

93%

KAAP

  

23

23

7%

Sugar

40

7

1

48

13%

Milk

39

150

23

212

60%

Eggs

52

  

52

15%

Butter

33

 

10

43

12%

Yeast

2

1

 

2

0.7%

Salt

4

  

4

1.1%

Biga

442

    

TZ

 

58

   
      

Total flour

357

    

Total dough

717

    
      
      

Heat milk salt sugar butter to almost boiling

  

Mix in flour

     

Refrigerate for 16 hours

   

Mix ingredients for Biga

   

Refrigerate for 48 hours

   

Mix all but butter - when ingredients incorporated add butter

Mix intensively in mixer until dough is very strong

 

Rest 60 minutes

    

Shape in pieces

    

Proof until almost soft - then glaze with milk

   

Bake at 375 for 40 minutes

   

 

 

 

clazar123's picture
clazar123

Tell me about proofing a pan de mie when the lid is closed

I have a thread in which I have asked the best use of an antique pan that is lidded and clamped shut.

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/33440/any-ideas-best-use-pan

I decided to use it to make my weekly whole wheat but I have never made a pan de mie type bread. Normally, I'd poke my loaf to see when it was proofed and then bake. Well...this pan is designed to be filled on the bottom half and then clamped shut so the loaf rises and shapes into the top half,producing a torpedo shaped loaf.The dough is not accessible once the lid is shut. I just proofed for 15 min,couldn't open the lid and decided to bake. We may have a boat anchor! Is it that when you work with a pullman pan the recipe generally is adapted to the pan? Is there any way I can calculate about how much dough will fill and produce a pleasing (as in not compacted from pressure) crumb?

We had a warm front move in and this is the first time since last summer that my kitchen is over 65F (it is actually 84F). I didn't think to make my dough cooler and as a result, they are rising like rockets! That is why I think 15 min was enough proof time. I had another dough made that normally would be about  1 hour behind-giving me time to proof and bake the first loaf but I have it in the refrigerator to retard it a bit.Huge difference in dough behaviour with the increased temp.

evonlim's picture
evonlim

Sprouted Organic Wild Black Rice SD Bread

baked this a while ago.. came out beautiful. (will be back to furnished the formula and the rest .. ) 

have to clean up and cook dinner now 

cheers

evon

am back.. this is what i did

Flour

sprouted 300g organic black rice (total 4 days)

200g drained and cold dry in the fridge.. then blend till fine.

(100g left for add in)

150g organic coconut flour ( just love how this flour gives a good crunch after toast, fragrant as well) 

150g bob's red mill organic wholewheat flour

250g strong bread flour 14% protein

250 Gold unbleached AP

200g active starter

add ins

100g black rice sprouts

300g edamame (boiled n peeled)

100g toasted brown sesame seeds

a handful of dry ramie leaves, grind ( a local leaves used to make Hokkien O Ku Kueh)

700g water (50g hold back)

15g salt

2 tbsp rice malt syrup

mixed all the flour, rami leaves, rice malt syrup, starter n water

autolysed 40mins

add in salt n 50g hold back water

rest 40 mins

add in sesame seeds, sprouts and edamame (add water if needed)

rest 40mins

SF 3 times 30, 60, 90 mins

it was late, retarded the dough in the fridge, i did the third SF in the morning, put it back in the fridge.

came back in the afternoon.. took out rest to room temp. shape n bench rest 30mins. reshape and proofed in basket for 1 n half hour 

(check dough at all times)

baked in a preheated oven 250C with steam 15mins.. 20mins without steam. cool in oven with opened oven door 

black rice sprouts

2nd SF 

 

 

 

made 3 medium loaves

 

 

here are the crumb shot... bottom is wee bit dansed, why? how can i get it evenly open? 

 

as for the taste, it is a serious bread!! like eating from white rice, brown rice to black rice! need to get acquainted with the taste and grainy texture. overall, it is soft, chewy n pleasent grainy bite with nice crunch of the crust becos of baking with steam and boldly baked.

it is a lot of prep.. and time taken sprouting and etc.. as dabrownman said a bread without sprouts is like a solar without sun! 

so.. let's sprout and bake, happy sprouting and baking

 

evon

 

 

 

sunhana's picture
sunhana

Dutch Brown Bread - Bruinbrood

I've never eaten dutch brown bread but my colleague ate it back in holland, adores it. I've came up with a recipe that uses 100% wholemeal flour, molasses syrup, instant yeast, gluten flour, salt and olive oil. Used prefermented dough method and the end result is soft, fluffy bread. the texture is okay but the color of the bread is not as dark as what my friend described. can anyone share their dutch brown bread recipe with me? or any pointers to get dark brown colored bread? I added a lot of molasses syrup but it just doesn't darken it that much.My friend said it's not rye (i tried added rye but she said brown bread has no sour taste). Please help...thanks.

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