The Fresh Loaf

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GSnyde's picture
GSnyde

How I Roll: Old and New Favorites

Over the past couple weeks, I’ve been on a roll….Well, actually, sandwich fillings have been on a roll literally.  I’ve been making rolls, but that’s not a figure of speech of which I am aware.  I suppose I could say I’ve been roll-playing.  Anyway…enough tropes.

Last week I made an old favorite: the highly enriched sandwich buns SylviaH introduced us to back in 2010 (http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/17329/buns-sandwiches).  This is like a Challah in crust and crumb, with egg, honey, milk and butter in the mix.  I’ve made these four or five times, and Sylvia’s formula is easy and the outcome is always wonderful.  I’ve enjoyed it for burgers, sandwich meats, tuna salad or—most recently— oval shaped for Chicken Teriyaki sandwiches.

This weekend I finally got around to trying the “Po-Boy Rolls” that ehanner posted about way back in 2007 (http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/4329/po-boy-victory).  This formula comes from Bernard Clayton, who calls it “Blue Ribbon French Bread”.  I was looking for the perfect rolls for French Dip sandwiches, something with a thin crackly crust and a light, tender, regular crumb. This formula was perfect, just slightly enriched with a bit of milk and butter, very fully developed dough.  Made into six rolls (instead of the two long batards Eric made), they absorbed the jus nicely, but held together.  A bit of horseradish sauce, some thin sliced Tri-tip roast, and an herb- and garlic-infused jus—pretty perfect sandwich!  And fresh out of the oven, with butter and jam, they were a nice accompaniment for an omelet, too.

Two very different kinds of rolls, but both certain to be regulars in my baking rotation.

Glenn

mpiasec's picture
mpiasec

king arthur hamberger rolls

just made king arthurs hambergers buns, they seem to be a little heavy.  Can you tell me why?

ananda's picture
ananda

Toasted Suflower Seed Wholemeal Bread and Some Breakfast Pastries

Croissant Dough with a Sponge

My base recipe for laminated yeasted dough, with a couple of amendments.   A bit of sugar is included, although my own preference remains a croissant without sugar.   And I have adapted the formula to use a sponge where 20% of the total flour becomes pre-fermented.

Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Sponge

 

 

Marriage’s Strong Organic White Flour

20

200

Fresh Yeast

0.1

1

Water

12

120

TOTAL

32.1

321

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

Sponge [from 1 above]

32.1

321

Marriage’s Strong Organic White Flour

80

800

Salt

1.3

13

Sugar

5

50

Milk Powder

5

50

Fresh Yeast

4

40

Water

51

510

TOTAL

178.4

1784

 

 

 

3. Laminating Process

 

 

Final Dough above

178.4

1784

Butter – lightly salted

36

360

TOTAL

214.4

2144

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

20

-

% overall hydration

63

-

FACTOR

1 0

-

 

Method:

  • Make the sponge the night before and leave to ferment slowly.
  • For the dough, blend the milk powder, salt and sugar through the flour.   Weigh very cold [I pre-chill the water overnight] water into the mixing bowl, and dissolve the fresh yeast into this.   Add the sponge and the dry ingredients.   Mix with a hook attachment for 3 minutes on slow and 4 minutes on second speed, scraping down the bowl as necessary.
  • Cover the dough and store in the chiller for half an hour, and meanwhile cut the butter into slices and roll between 2 plastic bags to create a pliable sheet of butter.
  • Roll out the croissant dough so that the slab of butter fits onto two thirds of the dough slab.   Fold the butter in letter-style to create 2 layers of butter.   Rest for one hour in the chiller.
  • Turn through 90° and roll out to the same size as before.   Fold the dough in 3 for the first turn, then chill a further hour.   Repeat this 3 more times to give 4 x ½ turns in total.   Rest a further one hour
  • I then split the dough into 3 sections, and made 12 Pain Amande with one piece, 9 Pain aux Raisins with another, and 14 croissants with the last piece.
  • Glaze each finished unit with egg, dip the Pain Amande in flaked almonds and set to proof for 45 minutes.
  • I used the electric oven to bake these on convection heat setting at 210°C for approx 15 minutes each tray; there were 5 trays in total.
  • Cool on wires

 

Yeasted Sunflower Seed Wholemeal Bread with Mixed Pre-ferments

Both cultures given 2 refreshments prior to use:

Rye Sourdough

Day

Stock

Flour

Water

Total

Friday 09:00

40

120

200

360

Friday 17:00

360

60

100

520

 

Wheat Levain

Day

Stock

Flour

Water

Total

Friday 09:00

40

200

120

360

Friday 17:00

360

100

60

520

nb. The levain was allowed to ferment slowly overnight in the chiller after the last refreshment.

Material/Stage

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1a] Rye Sourdough

 

 

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

9

180

Water

15

300

TOTAL

24

480

 

 

 

1b] Wheat Levain

 

 

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

15

300

Water

9

180

TOTAL

24

480

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

Rye Sourdough [from 1a]

24

480

Wheat Levain [from 1b]

24

480

Marriage’s Organic Strong Wholemeal

76

1520

Shoyu-Roasted Sunflower Seeds

20

400

Salt

1.5

30

Fresh Yeast

2.5

50

Water

50

1000

TOTAL

198

3960

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

24

-

% overall hydration

74.4

-

% wholegrain

85

-

FACTOR

20

-

 

Method:

    • Combine wholemeal, water and rye sourdough and mix until clear with a dough hook on first speed.   Autolyse for one hour.
    • Add the wheat levain and bakers’ yeast and mix for 2 minutes on first speed and 3 minutes on second speed.   Add the salt, mix 3 more minutes on second speed.   Add the toasted seeds and mix on first speed until clear.   DDT 27°C.
    • Bulk ferment dough at 26°C for 2 hours.
    • Knock back the dough gently, and scale and divide.   I made one small panned loaf @ 500g; a large panned loaf, 3-pieced each one @ 350g; a Pullman Pan, 4-pieced each one also @ 350g.   The remaining dough, just over 1kg, was used to make one large Boule.   Mould each piece round, and rest covered for 15 minutes.   Shape each piece and dip in seeds and assemble panned loaves, and use a banneton for the boule.
    • Final proof: Boule fermented  @ 26°C for one hour; 2 panned loaves followed on, so 1¾ hours proof.   The Pullman was held back by fermenting at 15°C for 2½ hours.
    • Bake the loaves with steam…I used my electric oven for today’s bake, pre-heated to 280°C, then settling at 235°C for 10 minutes.   Then I switched to convection and baked out the breads at 210°C.
    • Cool on wires

We are about to go out for dinner at our friends' home nearby.   The bread is for them, as really valued customers; the pastries pictured are a gift.

All good wishes

Andy

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Make your own Greek yogurt

Make your own Greek yogurt and then use the drippings to make great bread by substituting the yogurt whey water for the water in your bread.

Juergen Krauss's picture
Juergen Krauss

The Dark Side Attacks: 70% rye plus wheat / emmer / spelt

Mischbrot variations

In earlier experiments with breads having a higher percentage of rye flour I found that adding spelt, emmer or semolina complemented the rye very well.

With this bake I wanted to compare the effect of substituting the wheat part with emmer and spelt in breads with 70% rye. The flours are all from Shipton Mill.

The outcome:



I used my tried and tested Mischbrot formula as a base, this time using a rye starter with 100% hydration. The starter is made with dark rye, while the remaining rye in the formula is light rye.

Here the formula:

Straight formula

Percent

Amount(g)

Amount (oz)

Dark Rye

24

108

3.83

Light Rye

46

208

7.33

Bread flour

30

136

4.78

Or light spelt flour

30

136

4.78

Or wholegrain emmer flour

30

136

4.78

salt

2

9

0.32

water

75

339

11.96

yield

177

800

28.22

 

 

 

 

Rye sour

 

 

 

Dark rye flour

24

108

3.83

Water

24

108

3.83

Mature starter

2.4

11

0.38

Yield

50.4

227

8.04

 

 

 

 

Dough

 

 

 

Light Rye

46

208

7.33

Bread flour

30

136

4.78

Or light spelt flour

30

136

4.78

Or wholegrain emmer flour

30

136

4.78

Salt

2

9

0.32

Water

51

231

8.13

Rye sour

48

217

7.65

Yield

177

800

28.22

At the current cooler temperatures (about 23C / 73F in my kitchen) the starter took 16 hours to mature.
With 70% rye the doughs / pastes are very sticky and require only a short mix/knead so that all materials are mixed well.

After 100 minutes of fermentation at 23C / 73F I shaped rounds with very wet hands (in mid-air), and put t hem into baskets (floured with light rye) for the final rest..After 60 minutes the rounds showed cracks, a sign that they are ready for the bake.

The bake (on a stone, with steam) started at maximum temperature (ca.  240C / 464F), after 15 minutes I turned the loaves and lowered the temperature to 210C / 410F, After another 20 minutes the bread was ready.

I am very happy with oven spring and bloom. All three breads performed equally well and were indistinguishable from the outside.

After a day I cut into the loaves. The crumb is quite similar in all three loaves, the bread containing wholegrain emmer  is a bit darker and more dense.(The wheat bread got a bit of a shadow - bad photography!)

Although the crumb looks fairly dense, the breads actually feel light.

The crust could be thicker, but that's my oven – not much I can do about this at the moment.

The taste of the three breads is also very similar – quite complex with rye dominating, and a distinctive tangy after-taste. The emmer bread has the most complex taste.

There are a few things I would like to try with this formula:
1. using all wholegrain flours
2. going back to the original German way: using all medium rye and refined flours (which would be called ”Berliner Landbrot”)
3. Reducing the amount of rye sour and using some of the wheat/emmer/spelt in a stiff starter as a second preferment
4. using a wheat/emmer/spelt poolish as a second preferment
5. adding spices

Lots to do!
Juergen

JoeV's picture
JoeV

Sourdough Whole Wheat No-knead Cinnamon bread

I had a taste for cinnamon bread, and I had just finished a two-day feeding of my starter. So I just improvised a little from the standard no-knead formula and came up with this handsome fellow. The smell was magnificent as it was baking, and this loaf had an 18 hour fermentation.

Baked in my oblong cloche

11 oz. All purpose flour

5 oz. Stone ground whole wheat flour
1/2 C Cinnamon chips (you can add up to another 1/2C, but no less)
1-1/2 t Kosher salt
1/2 C Sourdough starter (vibrant)
14 oz. Purified water at room temperature

Blend starter with water until all you have is milky colored water, then mix everything together as you normally would. Allow to ferment on the counter for 12-18 hours before shaping.

No-knead directions for beginners avsailable on my website at http://flyfishohio.us/NoKneadBread.htm

 

ananda's picture
ananda

Borodinsky using the Auerman Process

Borodinsky using the Auerman Process

Late last week a package arrived for me in the post from Faith, who posts here at TFL.   She had been on a visit to Russia and brought back a tub of Red Rye Malt for both Daisy_A and one for me.

My wife, Alison went out of her way yesterday to buy some Blackstrap Molasses for me to enable me to bake a Borodinsky loaf today.

Here is the detail and formula.

Rye Sour build:

Day/Time

Stock

D Rye

Water

TOTAL

Monday 08:00

64

300

500

864

 

Material/Stage

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1a] Rye Sourdough

 

 

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

30

300

Water

50

500

TOTAL

80

800

 

 

 

1b] “Scald”

 

 

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

15

150

Red Rye Malt

5

50

Blackstrap Molasses

6

60

Crushed Coriander Seeds

1

10

Boiling Water

35

350

TOTAL

62

620

 

 

 

2. “Sponge”

 

 

Rye Sourdough [from 1a]

80

800

“Scald” [from 1b]

62

620

TOTAL

142

1420

 

 

 

3. Final Paste

 

 

“Sponge” [from 2]

142

1420

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

25

250

Marriage’s Organic Strong White flour

25

250

Salt

1.2

12

TOTAL

193.2

1932

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

30 + 20 = 50

-

% overall hydration

85

-

% wholegrain flour

75

-

FACTOR

10

-

 

Method:

  • Build the sourdough as described above.   Make the “scald” as follows:   crush the coriander and add it to the red rye malt and dark rye flour.   Weigh the molasses into a pan, add water and bring to a rolling boil.   Tip this onto the flour mix, and add any extra boiling water if there is evaporation.   Stir well to ensure full gelatinisation.   Cover and cool.
  • Once sufficiently cool, add the scald to the sour to make the sponge.   Cover and leave to ferment for 6 hours.
  • For the final paste combine the sponge with remaining flour and the salt, mix with the paddle beater in an upright machine, 2 minutes on first speed and 2 minutes on second speed.   Scrape down the bowl to ensure thorough mixing.
  • Bulk proof for 1 hour with DDT at 25 - 27°C.
  • Shape into a large Pullman Pan, prepared with lining of butter and coating of rye flour.   Smooth off and top with freshly crushed Coriander seeds.
  • Final proof for just 1 hour at 27°C, then bake.
  • Pre-heat the oven to 280°C.   Load the pan, apply steam, and turn the oven down to 100°C.   Keep a supply of steam in the oven and bake for a total of 4½ hours.
  • Cool on wires; wrap in linen and leave 24 hours before cutting into the bread.

CHOCOLATE, dark chocolate!

 

Alison’s massage therapist left half an hour ago, and bought half of this loaf.   I’m celebrating as it means I got to capture a crumb shot, and to taste a lovely thin slice too, all on its own.   Sourness and bitterness, but also just enough sweetness too from the malt.   It’s dark, dark like chocolate, and the spicy coriander is very pronounced …Taste!

All good wishes

Andy

Matt Edy's picture
Matt Edy

Egg substitute in sweet bun dough

Wondered if anyone knew of a substitute for eggs in a sweet bun dough (for hot cross buns)?

Finding that eggs in dough cause the bread to dry up and go hard very quick....

Many thanks

 

Graid's picture
Graid

What sort of rye is this and how would I achieve it?

I was until recently under the mistaken impression that all rye bread was the sort you get in supermarkets in the UK and Belgium and Sweden. Small, dense, dark, and exceedingly rich in flavour.

This is the picture of the common UK brand. Like in Belgium and Sweden it is sold in the UK in pre-sliced form. The texture is crumbly and the bread has a habit of falling in half when you take the slices out. 

Ingredients: Cereal (Rye Wholemeal, Whole Grain Rye Flour), Water, Natural Sourdough (Wholegrain Rye Meal, Water), Sea Salt.

I followed a 'deli style rye' recipe from the American artisan bread in 5 minutes book, and was rather surprised that it produced a nice tasting loaf but decidedly unlike the sort of 'rye' I have been wanting. Really quite light in colour, and far more subtle in flavour. Ignorant of me perhaps, but it was news to me that when recipes from other countries say 'rye' they don't necessarily mean the very dark bread I'm used to. 

Is it a 'dark rye' that this sort is called, or is it something more like pumpernickel, does anyone know? I notice the tendency of such loaves to be made in Germany- is this a specifically German style of rye bread?

Is regular rye flour different from the wholemeal and whole grain rye flour mentioned in the ingredients? The rye flour I have been using is unbranded stuff from my local health food store, so I am uncertain of the type, but it looks quite fine. 

Any advice would be appreciated on unravelling the mysteries of rye varieties.

3 Olives's picture
3 Olives

Keeping Chocolate Chip Cookies from Spreading and Chip Recommendations

I've been using the Toll House recipe for years and the cookies always taste great. They spread more than I like but that's a visual issue and doesn't effect the taste. I'm making some cookies as a gift and I'd like them to be a bit plumper.  Will chilling the dough decrease the spreading?

Also, any chocolate chip recommendations would be appreciated.

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