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golgi70's picture
golgi70

Farmers Market Week 6 Pane Maggiore

So I have been mostly creating fomulas for this project with the exception of last weeks Cherry Almond which was just a slight tweak to a common formula for fruit and nut breads.  I scrolled past this formula on Yeastspotting and it looks just like a loaf I always crave titled "Peasant Bread" at a nice Artisan Bakery on the East Coast.  Unfortunately there are so many plays on the theme of Peasant Bread I couldn't just google it.  I've been meaning to contact that bakery and see if they'd be willing to share but just never got around to it.  Then on my last visit they wouldn't even sell me a small portion of levain so i could make bread for my family.  So I doubt they'd share their formula.  

Anyway I used the google translate and gave this one a shot.  Its certainly possible I didn't follow the instructions as I should but I did follow what the translation "said to me"  I wanted to make some alterations but I left it alone and went with it.  I used High Protein as it translated as strong flour (I would just use bread flour next time to help open the crumb), I also used whole coarse ground rye and wheat and I'm betting they use a finer wheat and a medium rye.  Therefor even at 86% hydration my crumb isn't as open as I'd have liked but its delicious and very simliar to the loaf I craved.   I'll further add this dough was a challenge for shaping and I would have also gotten improved results with a tighter shape.  I will certainly make this again.  

Formula can be found here

http://www.ploetzblog.de/2013/06/01/leserwunsch-pane-maggiore/

And for some pictures.  I'm not posting as many but I'll tell you that I got great oven spring but not so much bloom and ears formation and that is due to my shaping.  A little practice with this dough and I'm sure I'd see wonderful results.  It also may be better as a boule and all I have enough of at home are oval bowls.  

* Changes I'd make.  I wouldn't bother changing my grind on the whole grains but I would deffinately go with a good bread flour opposed to the higher protein.  I'd also decrease the yeast even further to slow down the bulk fermentation a bit allowing for the folds to happen before the dough is ready to shape.  Don't get me wrong it went well but had I got this in the retarder a little less ready to go I also would have had improved results.  I would consider cutting the yeast altogether but it was part of the formula and I wanted to try it.  If I did cut it I think the levain would need to be at least doubled to compensate.  

 

Got some lovely plums, pluots, raspberry jam, cabbage, braising greens, salad greens, ground lamb, and breakfast sausage.  

Happy Baking

Josh

Syd-a's picture
Syd-a

First EVER Sourdough bread

So here's the result of my first ever sourdough bread baking session and only the second time I have ever made bread.

I have an immature (2 weeks old), but very active organic Rye starter that as you can see is very bubbly and happy after a good feeding session.  These are 2 basic white sourdough loaves, with long proofing and low knead time.   Here is the crumb shot too. Some good air pockets here and there. Mainly around the top crust, why? Any thoughts on the crumb and texture of the dough?  The taste was definitely sour, but it will likely develop as I move my starter to the fridge to get a deeper flavour profile, but it was pretty tasty to say the least. Very moist too but still light enough and not overly doughy from what I can tell.  I had no bannetons, the loaves stuck to my cloth in bowls that also in the end were too big and they went in the oven very flat and deflated after those issues. I also couldn't score as I wanted to because they were deflated too. However, I got a good spring with some steam in the first 20 min and despite some issues I need to solve with what to proof my bread in, it was a fairly successful first time I believe. I need to solve my banneton woes though.  Ay thoughts or tips from what I have shown are most welcome. I am thinking of starting a blog, but not sure if most people are interested in forum posts or more detailed blogs here? I am very much a novice when it comes to any kind of cooking, but baking and bread appeals to me and I hope to test myself over the coming weeks with more complex loaves and techniques. Looking to get into some deep and dark ryes and pumpernickels and mix it up with some light breads too.  Thanks for looking in Andy

 

Dusty Couche's picture
Dusty Couche

New guy with questions.

Hi, found this site after getting some books out of the library and watching lots of youtube. I have made a no knead dutch oven bread that i like the taste of, but looking for more sourdough taste. Wondering if the next step is to let the leaven age a bit more or let the dough proof a bit longer (in the fridge?)

also looking for some equipment. I like the look of the orange King Arthur scrapers, but was told they are not made any more. Anyone have one thy would part with? I would also like to get a couple of proofing baskets, plastic or natural. Used is fine.

Having lots of fun!

Paul

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

Rye - To Autolyse or Not To Autolyse

I am planning to bake a bread similar to Hamelman's Whole Rye & Whole Wheat Bread.  I noticed in many of his rye bread formulas, he does not list an autoylse in the formula directions.

Is an autoylse step typically not done for rye breads?  Am I correct in not doing an autolyse in that particular formula (for those who happen to be familiar with it....ahem-Dave-ahem..)?

I have read a few past posts regarding this same question.  Most answers seem to point in the direction that yes, you should autolyse.  But why would Hamelman exclude this step in some of his rye formulas and then not in others?  Perhaps because he expects the reader to be using a powerful mixing machine to develop the gluten?

John

chris319's picture
chris319

Sourdough Alternatives to Wheat

After consulting with doctor today (A1C 5.7) I am looking for low-glycemic-index alternatives to wheat for sourdough. Does anyone have any experience with the following grains in making sourdough? (G.I numbers in parentheses.)

Buckwheat (47)

Bulgur wheat (48)

Spelt (54)

Ideally the g.i. should be 55 or less -- the lower the better. No doubt rye would make great sourdough but it just squeaks by at 55 - 58. Regarding glycemic index, a lot depends on the composition of the flour and wholeness of the grain. Does anyone have any experience with the first three (buckwheat, bulgur or spelt) in sourdough (and starter of course)? Breads made with wheat flour have a g.i. above 70 which is too high.

Many thanks.

Ruralidle's picture
Ruralidle

Sourdough baking article

I think that this article encapsulates why I like baking sourdough breads.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Buttermilk and Greek Yogurt Multigrain SD with Seeds and Sprouts

After seeing Ian’s post using buttermilk and Greek yogurt I just couldn’t resist taking one of our normal multigrain breads and having a go at it to see what the taste difference would result.  Plus Lucy is always one to try new and interesting things in bread so that she can DaPumperize them later.

 

We had made a huge batch of Greek yogurt earlier in the week and was just going to go with that as an add it but noticed the buttermilk was still unopened even if 3 months out of date.  My reasoning was that since buttermilk is sour already, how much more sour would it be and if baking it to 205 F on the inside what could live through that?  The buttermilk smelled fine but was much thicker than usual. 

 

We used 10 g each of our WW and rye starters to build the levain.  One hour after the 3rd feeding we refrigerated it for 48 hours to bring out the sour.  When we removed the levain from the fridge so it could finish its doubling in volume we started the autolyse of everything else, including the ground flax and sesame seeds, except the sprouts, pumpkin seeds and aromatic bread spices consisting of caraway, fennel, anise and coriander.

  

This week we ran out of everything so had to make a batch of Toadies and some barley and rye sprouts to make red and white malts out of later today after their 5 days of sprouting.  We pinched off 50 g of these wet sprouts for this bread yesterday.  

  

All the whole grains were in the levain and we added some potato flakes, semolina and corn flour to the AP in the dough flours.  The whole grains came in at slightly less than 25 % but when including the Toadies and sprouts this shoots up to over 40%.  Toadies are sifted middlings, wheat bran, oat bran and wheat germ that is toasted until golden brown and then reground.

  

My Greek yogurt is much thicker than the ones in the stores and the buttermilk was very thick so I had to guess at what the hydration was for those items and constructed the formula to have it come out like it felt while doing the slap and folds   It felt like around   75% hydration dough after 12 minutes of slap and folds.

 

We also did 3 sets of S& F’s on 15 minute intervals and incorporated the sprouts and aromatic seeds on the first set and the pumpkin seeds on the 2nd set.  By the 3rd set the add ins were evenly distributed.  We gave the dough a 15 minute rest and then shaped it into an oval and dropped it into an oval basket and immediately refrigerated it for 21 hours.

 

It rose about 70% in the fridge during retard and we let it come to room temperature and final proof fro 2 hours before being scored and baked in the mini oven with 2 of Sylvia’s steaming Pyrex cups which were heated to boiling in the microwave. 

 

The mini was heated to 500 F and the bread was un-molded onto parchment on a peel.  The bread was transferred to the mini oven’s broiler pan vented top, the 2 steaming cups added and the whole assembly was loaded into the mini oven.

 

After 3 minutes we turned the temperature down to 475 F since we know the oven reads 25 F higher than actual temperature.   After 12 more minutes of steamed baking we removed the cups and continued to bake lowering the temperature to 425 F - convection this time.  In 20 more minutes of rotating the bread 90 degrees every 5 minutes, the bread was deemed done when it reached 205 F on the inside.

 

It sprang fairly well in the oven and smelled wonderful with those aromatic seeds.  It browned nicely too - but no big blisters that the mini oven is so famous for –just small ones.  he crumb was soft and moist and the crust stayed crunchy shattering when cut.  You can definitely taste the tang of the Greek Yogurt and the buttermilk.  Our bread is usually tangy but this is a whole new and different kind if tang,  You can also taste the aromatic seeds in the background.  It was great toasted with butter and as a lunch sandwich.  I think I like the version using yogurt whey as the liquid better though.  Never really made a bread with Greek yogurt nad buttermilk before,nor have tasted one till now.  Glad I did and thanks Ian for the inspiration.

 

Formula

 

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

WW & Rye  SD Starter

20

0

0

20

4.81%

Rye

4

4

4

12

2.88%

Farro

4

4

4

12

2.88%

WW

4

4

4

12

2.88%

Barley

4

4

4

12

2.88%

Spelt

4

4

4

12

2.88%

Water

28

28

28

84

20.19%

Total

68

48

48

164

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WW and RyeSD Levain

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

94

22.60%

 

 

 

Water

94

22.60%

 

 

 

Hydration

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

19.50%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

Potato Flakes

12

2.88%

 

 

 

Semolina 50 & Corn Flour 10

60

14.42%

 

 

 

AP

250

60.10%

 

 

 

Dough Flour

322

77.40%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

7

1.68%

 

 

 

Buttermilk

287

68.99%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

62.39%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

416

100.00%

 

 

 

Buttermilk 287 & Water 94

381

 

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

74.34%

 

 

 

 

% Whole Grain Flour

24.41%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

% Whole Grain w/ Toadies & Sprouts

40.56%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

76.39%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

964

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

 

Greek Yogurt50  12.06%

Aromatic Bread Spices

10

2.40%

 

 

 

Ground Flax & Sesame Seeds

10

2.40%

 

 

 

Pumpkin Seeds

25

6.01%

 

 

 

Toadies

10

2.40%

 

 

 

VW Gluten

5

1.20%

 

 

 

Total

110

26.44%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sprouts

 

%

 

 

 

Rye Berries

25

6.01%

 

 

 

Barley

25

6.01%

 

 

 

Total Sprouts

50

12.02%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sprout weight is the wet sprouted weight.

 

 

 

 

Cob's picture
Cob

Rye Grain Flakes

Hello,

Does anoyone have tips for using rye flakes? I've only seen recipes for using whole rye grains, soaked overnight. Since they're flaked, I assume they need different, quicker treatment, like whole, jumbo rolled oats. There are directions for making a porridge on the packet but I've yet to try it. I fear using them thus soaked will yield a sticky, tacky, inedible crumb, something similar to the oat-porridge breads I've made in the past.

I bought them initiially as a substitution for malted wheat flakes (for Granary style bread). I used it similarly, that is, straight from the bag and added to the dough. But they were, dissappointingly, nothing like malted wheat flakes.

I have an idea to toast them slightly in the oven before use (like malted wheat flakes).

Does anyone have inspiration for using flaked rye grains?

Thanks! :)

Skibum's picture
Skibum

Pulla for the EMS team

Well my nieghborhood has turned into a reclamation camp.  I had EMS and Technical Rescue workers from as far away as the State of Illinois set up in front of my house for two days:

These people are here to help my friends and neighbors, so I baked a big batch of Pulla -- 4 loaves to help feed our helpers.  It was a hit with the Fire and EMS people on the scene.

I have been working with very small bake batches, ie 300 g flour for several months now.  I have to say that I got a better product working with a larger amount of dough.  This is the best Pulla bake I have ever had and chalk it up to the baking experience I have gained over the last 1 1/2 years of Fresh Loafing:

For some the world is returning to normal, but for others the real struggle begins and the recovery continues:

This has been very sad and most hard to watch.

After a week's closure in both directions the Trans Canada Highway re-opened today.  It still looks like a war zone . . .

Happy baking TFLers!  Brian

le boulonger86's picture
le boulonger86

Indian Chapati

Some Chapati I made using Atta flour cooked on a traditional tawa

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