The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

YW

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dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

These rolls are SD / YW, caramelized onion, sun dried tomato, bacon, parmesan cheese Emperor Rolls with Seeds so they are pretty much not Kaiser rolls or semmels any more.  We forgot to put in the basil but left it in the formula.

  

We were reading a post on another unmentioned site on how to make your own sun dried tomatoes.  Tomatoe are 25 cents a pound for Roma ones this week so no time like the present  to dry them.  Sun dried tomatoes have become increasingly more expensive in the store and are very easy to make at home.  I prefer mine roasted slowly with a little salt and Herbs de Provence packed in olive oil so that you get flavored oil too.

  

After finishing the tomato drying project we were looking around for a new way to use them besides in our standard pizza dough.  We also needed some hamburger buns for our monthly hamburger dinner.

 

We usually make these no fancy do shaped buns, with parmesan cheese, basil and apple wood smoked bacon but thought that a few minced sun dried tomatoes wouldn’t hurt them any – unlike what FedEx might do to your next package.

 

This time the apprentice thought we might give Emperor Roll shaping a try for these rolls and stick some; white and black poppy, white and black sesame, basil and nigella seeds on them with egg.  The (2) multi-seeded ones also had kosher salt and chia seeds in the mix.  We recently found some oregano seeds but forgot to use them on purpose - just to be consistent in forgetting stuff we would have liked to put in our recipes .

 

We also wanted to enrich our last dough for rolls with an egg to go along with the butter, NF milk and olive oil.  They ended up being 75% hydration our recent norm for white breads.

 

Kaiser rolls are always plain instead of having seeds on them and oddly they have nothing to do with the Kaiser either.  Odd how things get named isn’t it?  Kaiser rolls originate from Vienna, Austria and were supposedly named after the Emperor Franz Joseph but they are never called Emperor rolls.  So we ended up naming these Franz Joeseph's Emperor Rolls with Seeds.  We can understand how Empress Ying would have every right to be miffed bout this.

  

We shaped the rolls like they do here:

http://www.kingarthurflour.com/blog/2008/02/28/all-tied-up-shaping-kaiser-rolls/

 

And not the way Norm does here:

http://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=kaiser+roll+shaping&mid=B286163E82FA4DA942DEB286163E82FA4DA942DE&view=detail&FORM=VIRE5

 

Had we known it was Norm at the time, we would have shaped them the authentic way.  Next time for sure.

 

These Emperor Rolls with Seeds came out nicely brown and went soft as summer rolls tend to do in AZ.   Kaiser Rolls should be crusty and hard for NY authentic ones.

 

Method

We built the YW and SD levains separately over a 6 hour build with equal amounts of flour for each and 69% hydration.   The dough flours were autolysed with the milk for 4 hours.   When the levains and the dough flours came together we added the egg, oil softened butter, salt and malts and squeezed the dough through our fingers until incorporated.

After the dough had rested for 15 minutes, we did the first of (4) sets of S&F’s on 30 minute intervals.  The first one was (16) ¼ turns reducing by 4 turns each successive set.  The dough rested in a plastic covered oiled bowl in between sets.  After the last set the dough was retarded for 12 hours in the 38 F fridge in the oiled plastic covered bowl.

After the retard was complete we let the dough sit out for 1 hour on the counter to warm up.  We then weighed out (10) 112 g pieces and shaped them into balls.  After a 10 minute rest under plastic on the counter, we rolled out the balls into 14”ropes.

After another 10 minute rest they were shaped into Kaiser rolls and placed on parchment paper on cookie sheets to final proof covered in a plastic trash can liner for 2 hours.  The tops wee brushed with egg wash and sprinkled with the seeds.

Big Betsy was fired up to 450 F with (2) of Sylvia’s steaming bread pans with wet towels in them.  After 45minutes the rolls were ready to bake with additional steam provided by the ½ C of water we tossed into the bottom of the oven.

After 2 minutes the temperature was turned down to 425 F and then down to 375 F when the steam came out at the 10 minute mark. The rolls were rotated 180 degrees every 5 minutes after the steam was removed to ensure even browning.  They were removed from the oven when they reached 205 F internal temperature about 25 minutes including the steam.  We didn’t brush the tops with milk to keep them soft when they came out of the oven like we normally do since we thought they would go oft enough on their own

Formula

YW / SD Combo Starter

Build 1

%

SD Rye and Desem Starter

20

3.56%

Yeast Water

50

12.44%

AP

150

17.41%

Water

50

12.44%

Total Starter

270

34.83%

 

 

 

Starter

 

 

Hydration

68.75%

 

Levain % of Total

25.94%

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

AP

350

87.06%

WWW

52

12.94%

Dough Flour

402

100.00%

 

 

 

Salt

8

1.99%

Non Fat Milk

262

65.17%

Dough Hydration

65.17%

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

562

 

Milk and Water

372

 

T. Dough Hydration

66.19%

 

Whole Grain %

11.39%

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

74.53%

 

Total Weight

1,041

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

Butter

28

6.97%

Egg

57

14.18%

Red Rye Malt

1

0.25%

White Rye Malt

1

0.25%

Olive Oil

12

2.99%

Total

99

24.63%

 

 

 

3 Thick Apple Wood Smoked Bacon Strips

2 T Chopped basil

 

 

4 T Caramelized onion.

 

 

1/4 C Grated Parmesan

 

 

2 T Sun Dried Tomato

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

We ran out of English muffins and once again used a variation fop the one at KAF.  We use YW in conjunction with a SD Desem starter to make EM;s that are very similar to Wofferman’s but 16% whole wheat.  They are light, fluffy, airy and just plain delicious.  We make them all the time and never want to run out of them in the freezer

 

After 8 hours the dough had more than doubled and stuck to the plastic cover to reveal the airy structure beneath. 

The method is simple enough.  Build the SD and YW levains over 6 hours in one stage each.  After the levains have doubled, mix everything except the salt, sugar and baking soda together and let sit out overnight or for 8 hours on the counter.  Make sure the bowl is covered in plastic and well oiled and at least 3 times the size of the dough ball.

 

See the 2 free form ones made after cutting out 7 on the first pass?

After the overnight proofing add the remaining salt, sugar and BP and knead on a floured work surface for 4-5 minutes.  Let rest for 10 minutes and then press out into a circle that is ¾ “ thick.  No need for a rolling pin.  Use a cutter to make 3”-4” rounds – I used a plastic drinking cup.  Move to a corn meal or semolina sprinkled parchment paper covered cookie sheet and cover with plastic to final proof 45 minutes on the counter.

 

We managed 9 large ones but you could get a dozen smaller ones.  Dry fry in a seasoned cast iron skillet on medium low heat about 4-5 minutes per side until golden brown.  Move to a cooling rack.  Eat while warm with butter and jam.  Yummy!

   

SD YW English Muffins - 16% Whole Wheat

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mixed Starter

Build 1

Total

%

SD Starter

10

10

2.46%

Yeast Water

31

31

9.39%

WW

31

31

9.39%

AP

41

41

12.42%

Water

41

41

12.42%

Total Starter

154

154

46.67%

 

 

 

 

Sd YW Starter Totals

 

 

 

Hydration

100.00%

 

 

Levain % of Total

21.12%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

Whole Wheat

30

9.09%

 

AP

300

90.91%

 

Dough Flour

330

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

7

2.12%

 

Milk

238

72.12%

 

Dough Hydration

72.12%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

407

 

 

Milk & Water

315

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

77.40%

 

 

Whole Grain %

16.22%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

729

 

 

 

 

 

 

Additional Ingredients

 

 

 

1 T Sugar

 

 

 

1 tsp Baking Soda

 

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

This bread originally started out to be baguettes along the line of the one Ian (isand66) baked this last week only with the addition of SD to his YW only levain.

  

 I was going to do a Pierre Nury take, no slash, Rustic Light Rye approach to it where you just cut a 10” square proofed dough into (2) 5”x10” rectangles,  stretch the dough to 12”and just let it plop on the parchment - no slashing required and then right into the oven it goes.  But then, my wife needs sandwich bread too?

  

The SD /YW combo levain was under way when Pip’s (Phil) latest fabulous bread hid TFL.   I decided to change the dough flours around to match his 15 % of fresh milled whole grains even though we used a multigrain approach, since they were already ground earlier in the day, which was different than Phil’s spelt. Both Ian and Phil used 75% hydration so we went with that.   

  

We cut Phil’s recipe to 1,200 g from 3,600.   We also decided to use Phil’s method of 6 hour levain build, long autolyse (5-6 hours) holding back some water, 3 minutes French fold (I used French Slap and Folds thinking they might be the same thing and we like doing them), add in the salt and the rest of water and squeezing the dough through the fingers until it come back together, another 3 minutes of French slap and folds, and a 4 hour bulk rise with no touching – no stretch and folds.

  

We pre-shaped and shaped going into a basket for 2 hours of proof on the counter, then into the fridge for a 12 hour retard.  It came out of the fridge in the morning nicely risen for another hour of warm up before going into the steaming mini oven oven at 500 F, steaming for 12 minutes with oven turned down to 450 F after 2 minutes.

 

 

Since my levain was already 21% of the final dough weight instead of the 10% that Phil used, I decided to cut the 4 hour bulk ferment in half to 2 hours undisturbed and the final proof from 2 hours to 1 hour before going into the fridge.  The rest of Phil’s method was not modified other than we went with a boule instead of a batard and used Ian’s signature T-Rex scoring since we skipped his baggies but we will do them soon.

 

Somehow Pierre Nury’s cut and stretch Rustic Method was not incorporated and he deserves better than that so we will use it next time.  It is odd how things can change based on a really good bread posted on TFL – like Phil’s.  Mine won’t come out as nice as Phil’s but, just the thought that it might, is worth the doing. 

  

The scoring went well as my apprentice modified, (bent), our single side razor blade into a gentle curve like a lame blade.  The boule puffed itself up very well during the 12 minute steaming using a combination of (1) of Sylvia’s steaming cups and  our latest bake’ bottom broiler pan with ½ C of water,  covered with the vented top of the broiler pan where the parchment and bread bakes.

 

After the steam came out, we baked the bread at 400 F, convection this time, for an additional 16 minutes (28 minutes overall) turning the boule 90 degrees every 4 minutes.  When the center hit 205 F we turned off the oven, left the door ajar and allowed the boule to cool in the oven for an additional 12 minutes.  The temperature rose to 209 F while resting in the off mini oven.

 

The bread sprang so much it was little close to the top elements and got a little dark on the top but, no worries, it wasn’t burnt and should add a little extra yumminess to the crust.  The mini (and steam) provided its signature blisters to the crust.  It came out crunchy crisp and shattered and cracked where it got the hottest as it cooled.  The crust softened as it cooled to become chewy.

The bottom wasn’t as brown as usual.  This has to be due to the water in the lower half of the broiler pan that was less than an1” from the bread.  Even though the spring was great with blisters we will go back to either Sylvia’s steam alone or covering the bread with a stainless steel bowl which will also keep the top from browning too much and still give us dark brown bottom crust and blisters.

This is also the largest boule we can possibly put in the mini oven.  It stuck to steaming cup and the side of the broiler pan as it was.  We think a loaf that was 200 g less in size would be more prudent.

The crumb came out fairly open but nearly as much as Phil’s did.   This because he is such a fine baker and my apprentice is not.   Plus, we used YW and cut the counter development time by about 2 hours or so to take into account we used twice as much levain.

But the crumb was glossy, moist, airy and light like our recent YW.SD bakes have been.   We will follow Phil’s methods more closely next time.   The taste is very good  Just what my wife will like for her lunch sandwich bread.   

15% Multi-grain Bread With YW and SD Combo Levain

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mixed Starter

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

SD Starter

0

10

0

10

1.49%

Yeast Water

50

0

0

50

9.29%

WW

10

0

0

10

1.86%

Durum Atta

0

10

0

10

1.86%

AP

40

45

25

110

20.45%

Water

0

55

10

65

12.08%

Total Starter

100

120

35

255

47.40%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Starter Totals

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration

88.89%

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

21.27%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

Wheat Germ

10

1.86%

 

 

 

Whole Wheat

10

1.86%

 

 

 

Whole Buckwheat

10

1.86%

 

 

 

Dark Rye

12

2.23%

 

 

 

Bulgar

10

1.86%

 

 

 

Whole Spelt

12

2.23%

 

 

 

Whole Kamut

12

2.23%

 

 

 

Whole Barley

10

1.86%

 

 

 

Bread Flour

201

37.36%

 

 

 

AP

231

42.94%

 

 

 

Steel Cut Oats

10

1.86%

 

 

 

Quinoa

10

1.86%

 

 

 

 

Total Dough Flour

538

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

11

2.04%

 

 

 

Water

385

71.56%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

71.56%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

673

 

 

 

 

Water

505

 

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

75.04%

 

 

 

 

Whole Grain %

15.01%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

75.04%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

1,199

 

 

 

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

We just love the authentic, taste texture and chew of Stan Ginsberg’s Favorite Bagels that are authentic and just plain delicious any way you want to eat them.  We keep messing with the grains and starters to get what we want in our favorite bagels.

 

 All the whole grains are in the starter, a new thing we are trying out lately.  The grains were home milled rye, WW and Kamut and make up 17% of the total flours.  We also included a little less than 10% of roasted potato left over from Beer Can Chicken. 

 

 As usual with out take on bagels, there is some barley malt, red and white malts were included to improve the color and taste of the bagels along with adding the enzymes that break down carbohydrates and starch into sugars that the yeast and bacteria can use to do their thing gas and sour wise.

 We have been using a combo YW and SD starter to build the levains for recent bagels and we did so again this time.  We get a nice moist open crumb with a slight SD tang using a combo starter.

From left to right front - Chia seeds, Sesame, white sesame and Multi - all the prvious plus, black sesame, kosher salt, basil and  nigella seeds.

 We used exactly the same method as last time and baked the bagels off in the mini oven using Sylvia’s steam developed for it.  Our change from Stan’s method is to proof the bagels after forming for 1 hour before refrigerating and we retard them for 24 hours before boiling them.

 These are now our favorite go to bagel and have now met our taste, texture, chew and color criteria.  They are just delicious.  Now there is not reason to go to NY for bagels anymore and it sure is cheaper too.

 Method

We built the YW and SD levain together over (2) 3 hour and (1) 2 hour build and then refrigerated them for 48 hours. Home ground whole wheat berries were used for the starter and accounted for all the whole grains in the final dough.

 

The flours, salt, mashed potatoes and malts were autolysed for 3 hours and hand mixed into the levain. The stiff dough was kneaded for 10 minutes by hand and then allowed to rest, ferment and develop for a whopping 15 minutes covered with plastic wrap on the counter.

The dough was them divided into (10) 122g pieces, folded into balls and then into 12” tapered, from middle to end, ropes. The ropes were rested for 10 minutes and then formed into bagels by the ‘over the knuckles’ method where the ends were rolled on the counter to seal them together.

The bagels were placed onto a parchment covered and corn meal sprinkled cookie sheet, covered in plastic wrap and refrigerated for 24 hours.

Latest $2 Goodwill purchase yesterday at half price.  It's a 901 - just perfect for an oval shape bread or nice baked chicken. 

After removing the bagels from the fridge, they were immediately simmered for 30 seconds a side in 1 gallon of water with 1 T of barley malt syrup and 1 tsp of baking soda. The wet bagel bottoms were placed on a kitchen towel for 5 seconds after coming out of the water, dunked in the topping of choice and then placed on parchment paper sprinkled with semolina which was on the top cover of the mini ovens broiler.

The mini oven was preheated to 45o F with the rack on the bottom. A 1 cup Pyrex measuring cup with a rolled up dish rag, half full of water, was micro waved until the water boiled. Sylvia’s steaming method was then placed in the middle of the parchment paper between (4) bagels at the corners.

The bagels were steamed for 8 minutes with the heat being turned down to 450 F. At the 8 minute mark the steam was removed, the bagels turned upside down and the rack rotated 180 degrees. The Mini Oven was also turned down to 425 F, convection this time,  at the 8 minute mark too.  After an additional 4 minutes, the bagels were turned 18o degrees on the parchment – still upside down..

At 16 minutes total baking time the bagels were deemed done. They were nicely browned top and bottom and sounded like a drum when tapped on the bottom. They were moved to wire cooling racks until cooled.

Formula

22% Whole Multi-grain SD YW Bagels     
      
Starter BuildBuild 1Build 2 Build 3Total%
Rye & WW Starter2000202.90%
Yeast Water155 202.90%
Dark Rye20250456.52%
WW20035557.97%
Kamut15  152.17%
Water4020157510.87%
Total100305023026.09%
      
SD / YW Starter %   
Flour12518.12%   
Water10515.22%   
Starter Hydration84.00%    
Levain % of Total 19.18%   
      
Dough Flour %   
Bread Flour28040.58%   
AP28040.58%   
Total Dough Flour56081.16%   
Salt142.03%   
Water30043.48%   
Dough Hydration53.57%    
      
Add - Ins %   
Red Rye Malt30.43%   
White Rye Malt20.29%   
Mashed Potato659.42%   
Barley Malt101.45%   
Total9013.04%   
      
Total Flour w/ Starter690    
Total Water w/ Starter405    
Tot. Hydration  w/ Starter58.70%    
Hydration w/ Adds64.39%    
Total Weight1,199120 grams each for (10)
% Whole Grain16.67%    

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

There is no question my apprentice likes to retard her pizza dough overnight but, sometimes you just don’t have that much time when the pizza urge hits you.  No worries!  We managed a very nice pizza in 8 hours starting at 10 AM yesterday.

 

We started the combo YW and Desem WW levain build and cut the 3 stage build from 3 to 2.  Two hours for the first stage and 3 hours for the second.  It had doubled in 5 hours.  For the last 3 hours of the levain build we autolysed the flour, dried rosemary, olive oil, Moho de Ajo, (2) malts, sun dried tomato oil, salt and the dough water.

 

We always try to have around 30% whole grains in our formulas if possible and this time it was a mix of whole wheat and soft white wheat that we ground at home.  So Desem WW starter was in order and we wanted the boost that YW gives to speed things along some due to the shot amount of time we had to get this dough ready.

 

5 hours in; 3 PM, we mixed the autolyse and the levains in the KA for 6 min on KA 2 and 2 minutes on KA 3.  Then we let it rest for 10 minutes.  We then did 3 sets of S & F’s, 10 minutes apart on a lightly oiled counter, starting with 20 stretches and ¼ turns and reducing the stretches by 5 each set – a total of 45 stretches.

The dough was ready to go after 2 hours and 15 minutes of resting and fermenting in a plastic covered oiled bowl.  At 5:15 PM we fired Old Betsy; Big GE oven too 500 F no steam.  These 2 pizzas were fully peel size and there was no way these were going to fit in the mini oven without some serious magic or ‘Honey I shrunk the pizza’ going on.

We also had the baking stone in there too since we never take it out of the oven except to move it to the grill for pizza there - like last time. Thankfully, after yesterday’s torrential rain it never got over 92 F so a little more heat in the house was not a big deal if you are used to 115 F for the last who knows how long.

After dividing the dough in half, we hand stretched it out to peel size, brushed a layer of some more Mojo de Ajo on, docked it  and put it in the oven to par bake for 3 minutes.  Then we removed it and then piled on the toppings of our choice, kalamata olives, hatch green chilies, red peppers, caramelized onions, re-hydrated dried shitake mushrooms, home made Italian sausage, pepperoni; parmesan, Colby and mozzarella cheeses  and some fresh basil for a garnish after it came out of the oven.

Then back into the oven for another 7 minutes or so to get nice and brown  - since, as Anne Burrell says “brown food tastes good’ and Brownmen agree with her.

 

Friday night grilled shrimp kabobs with Mexican Green Dirty Rice.  We are thinking beer can chicken for tonight.

The crust came out picture perfect thin and crisp, nicely browned on the bottom and tasted good.  After cutting, the slices were flat out rigid when held up, even with all the toppings and didn’t go limp, like NY Pizza, until the left over slices were being wrapped for freezing.

Sorry the photos are so bad this time but at night with indoor lighting it is the best my apprentice could manage.  They are still better then the ones my phone takes!  Formula follows at the end.

Soft White Wheat, WWSD YW Combo Pizza Dough

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Starter Build

Build 1

Build 2

Total

%

Desem  Starter

10

0

10

2.75%

Yeast Water

10

0

10

2.75%

Soft White

0

25

25

6.89%

WW

25

0

25

6.89%

AP

0

50

50

13.77%

Water

20

50

70

19.28%

Total

65

125

190

52.34%

 

 

 

 

 

Combo YW SD Starter

 

%

 

 

Flour

105

28.93%

 

 

Water

85

23.42%

 

 

Starter Hydration

80.95%

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

 

29.01%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

Soft White Wheat

58

15.98%

 

 

WW

0

0.00%

 

 

Bread Flour

100

27.55%

 

 

AP

100

27.55%

 

 

Total Dough Flour

258

71.07%

 

 

Salt

7

1.93%

 

 

Water

170

46.83%

 

 

Dough Hydration

65.89%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

Dried Rosemary

1

0.28%

 

 

Red Rye Malt

2

0.55%

 

 

White Rye Malt

2

0.55%

 

 

EVOO 10, SD Tom. 10, MdA 5

25

6.89%

 

 

Total

30

8.26%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour w/ Starter

363

 

 

 

Total Water w/ Starter

255

 

 

 

Tot. Hydration  w/ Starter

70.25%

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

69.29%

 

 

 

Total Weight

655

 

 

 

% Whole Grain

30.71%

 

 

 

 

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Never give up!

It has been a while since we last made a white bread that didn’t have some outlandish concoction of ingredients to make it healthier than your average slimy white slice.  So we toned this one down as it is meant for the wife’s daily bag lunch.

 

She is more traditional in her love of Oroweat Whole Wheat Bread to contain her sandwich fillings but we also wanted a bread that we could be sure to deliver some real whole grain goodness, wheat taste, extra light sourdough flavor, not too sweet, a soft, moist, yellowish, open crumb and a nice dark brown chewy crust once the bread cooled.

We hoped that our whole grain combination yeast water and sourdough starter in conjunction with soft white wheat (home ground), durum atta and WWW and the semolina, wheat germ, malts, bread and AP flour in the dough would provide what we were looking to get bread wise at the end of the day.

 

A little honey would supply a hint of sweetness and the whole soft white wheat berry soaker would supply some extra crumb texture and bite that we like so much.  We also used some yogurt whey water, from earlier Greek yogurt making this week, for part of the liquid trying to enhance the sour taste.  All together it is a simple white bread easily prepared that is fun to; make, bake, admire and devour.  

\

This was the original move from bamboo couche to the floured basket - not horrible so far.  Then 4 hours later in the fridge the whole time..... and the oven wasn't even preheated .......

This is a fine everyday eater and we got what we mostly desired along with a great wheat taste.  We were surprised how balanced the taste was between wheat and sour. We loved it crumb color too.   It is delicious bread that is perfect for everyday lunch sandwiches of all kinds.

We also got to use our bamboo double barrel batard couche that has been unloved for some time but we only used one barrel for this1,126 gloaf that is 35% whole grains, 74% hydration and where the levain is 30% of the total weight except……..

That is not what happened!

Well, that was the way it was supposed to be.  After shaping and loading the bread in the bamboo couche, it proved to be too small, so I switched it too a larger batard shaped woven basket lined with a rice flour coated towel and chucked it into the plastic bag and right into the fridge after reshaping for the 18 hr retard.  There was no proofing on the counter.

When I checked it in 4 hrs, right before bed time, this thing had exploded out of the basket like the Nile in full Spring Flood!  It might have been over proofed – a heck of a lot!  Immediately we fired up big old Betsy since this blob wasn’t going into the mini and got 2 of Sylvia’s steaming pans going for the 40 minute warm up.

When pre heat was over the dough was really loose and still spreading.  I overturned it onto parchment and a peel and scored it, why I don’t know since it was already spreading like a ciabatta and scoring only made it worse.  By the time I got it into the oven, throwing another 1/2 cup of water in the bottom of the oven as the door slammed, it was only 1” high and a full 10”wide.

It sprang great to almost 3” high before settling back to 2 ½” in height.  It was late by the time it cooled and was wrapped.  I’m guessing the yogurt water, inconjunction with the honey and the (2) malts enzyme action had something to do with making this dough look like a meth crazed, whack job on steroids.  Never had a dough go berserk while in the fridge for retarding after shaping before.  I didn’t have a clue anything was wrong until I checked on it at the 4 hr mark.  The method that follows is the one that should have been.

I got a fairly nice badly scored ciabatta out of what was supposed to be a sandwich loaf.  Next time this is going into a loaf pan from the get go and watched carefully.

The ribs would have almost fit this bread perfectly if the loaf had been split length wise like a ciaabatta :-) The ribs turned out sort of normal  - before the bread fiasco thoiugh.

A nice brie and Colby jack grilled cheese sandwich using this bread with left over potato salad and BBQ baked beans, 1/2 ea of the 3 P's - pear, peach and plumb each stuffed with blue berries, 1/2 banana, black grapes, another 1/2 pear with brie and Colby jack , cantaloupe chunks with carrot pieces and a nice little salad with yellow and red papper topped with tomato and feta.  A decent lunch for a decent sandwich bread.

The Method

Making this bread is pretty straight forward compared to our insane kitchen sink recent bakes.  First you build the combo YW and SD levain using (2 ) 3 hour builds, mixing in the 3rd build  WWW flour and then immediately refrigerating it.

Then you make the soft white wheat soaker and let it sit out for 4 hours before refrigerating it overnight.  No scalding or microwaving required if you have the time and patience for it to soak a long while.

I also ground up the soft white wheat berries from the freezer and added the rest of the flours, home made malts, and salt to the ground flour in a bowl.  The water and yogurt whey was added, mixed in well and allowed to autolyse on the counter for 2 hours before being refrigerated over night.

The next day, the now nearly doubled in volume levain and the autolyse were removed from the fridge and allowed to come to room temperature – about 2 hours.  The two were mixed together in the mixing bowl with a dough hook on KA 2 for 4 minutes and KA 3 for 2 minutes until it pulled away from the sides.

The dough was then allowed to rest for 20 minutes in an oiled bow lbefore (3) sets of S&F’s were done 15 minutes apart.  The soaker was drained and dried with a paper towel and incorporated on the 2nd S& F.  After the 3rd S&F, the seeds were well distributed and incorporated nicely.  The dough rested in an oiled bowl between S & F’s.  The dough was then formed into a ball and allowed to ferment and develop for 60 minutes on the counter in the same oiled bowl.

It was then pre-shaped and final shaped into a batard, and placed into the parchment lined, bamboo couche seam side up.  The couche was then wrapped in a tall kitchen trash bag, allowed to proof for 330 minutes before being refrigerated overnight while the bartard doubled in volume.

The next morning the mini oven (MO) was preheated to500 F, and 2 of Sylvia’s steaming Pyrex cups, half full of water with a rolled up hand towel inside, were heated to boiling in the microwave.  The batard was removed from the fridge and the trash can liner, turned over by rolling on the underlying parchment, poorly slashed and placed onto the top vented mini broiler pan with the 2 steaming cups.

The baking apparatus was placed into the MO and allowed to steam for 12 minutes with the temperature being turned down to450 Fafter 4 minutes.  At the 12 minute mark the steam was removed and the temperature was turned down to425 F(convection this time) and allowed to bake another 20 minutes.  The batard was rotated every 5 minutes until the internal temperature in the center of the loaf reached205 F.

The MO was turned off, the door positioned ajar and the loaf left inside for 10 minutes to crisp the skin.  The bread was then moved to a cooling rack.

Formula follows the pix’s as usual.

35% Whole Grain YW & SD Semolina, Durum Atta White Bread with Soaker

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mixed Starter

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

Multi-grain SD Starter **

20

0

0

20

3.27%

Yeast Water

75

0

0

75

18.03%

Durum Atta

40

35

 

75

18.03%

WWW

0

0

35

35

8.41%

Whole Soft White Wheat

75

0

0

75

18.03%

Water

20

35

0

55

13.22%

Total Starter

230

70

35

335

80.53%

** 10 g each Rye Sour & Desem

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Starter

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration

71.79%

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

29.75%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

Non – Diastatic Red  Malt

3

0.72%

 

 

 

Wheat Germ

10

2.40%

 

 

 

Semolina

100

24.04%

 

 

 

AP

200

48.08%

 

 

 

Diastatic White Malt

3

0.72%

 

 

 

Bread Flour

100

24.04%

 

 

 

Dough Flour

416

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

8

1.92%

 

 

 

Y. Whey Water -155, Water -152

307

73.80%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

73.80%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

611

 

 

 

 

Water

447

 

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

73.16%

 

 

 

 

Whole Grain %

34.53%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

73.98%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

1,126

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soaker

 

%

 

 

 

Soft White Wheat

50

12.02%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add ins

 

%

 

 

 

Honey

10

2.40%

 

 

 

Epsilon's picture

Cherry Yeast Water - question on activity

August 26, 2012 - 7:42pm -- Epsilon

I've got a batch of cherry yeast water I've been brewing since 2 days ago. I recently put it in a bigger home, fed it a little snack of brown sugar (just a few sprinkles since I thinned it out when I transferred it,) and it's already developing bubbles. In fact, it's got enough bubbles developing on it that when I gave it a shake to mix it, the top popped off (since I've got the top on loosely to let out some CO2.)

Am I looking at bacterial activity, or is this just a really quickly-developing yeast? Or is this typical?

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

 

My wife ran out of her Oroweat Whole Wheat bread yesterday so she asked for two pieces of bread for her bag lunch.  So I found some frozen Duram Atta SD for her we baked Mastaba Style here:

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/29145/sourdough-duram-atta-bread-%E2%80%93-pharaoh%E2%80%99s-mastaba-style

 

She said she really liked it when she got home and asked for the same thing for her lunch sammy the next day.  Sadly, that was the last of it and the last of any white or nearly white SD breads on hand in the freezer.  So she had to settle for 67% Rye Whole Wheat SD with seeds and sprouts we called Twisted Sisters Chacon that we baked here

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/29172/twisted-sisters-chacon-67-whole-rye-wheat-sprouts-seeds

 

We also wanted to make a near white bread with seeds and soaker on the lines of our last bake - Ian’s Mocha Disaster Chacon.  Instead of using mocha coffee for the liquid we wanted to use a just as deep adn dark chicken stock since we were making that at the same time anyway.  Our stock is made from roasted bones and clinging meat, no skin and saved suitable veggie ends and pieces of all kinds that are frozen for this purpose.  It is totally de-fatted and unsalted.

 

After posting on the forum and checking the TFL search, only a few folks have used chicken stock for the liquid in bread with Glenn Snyder and Shaio-Ping among them. HeidiH did too but considers it one of her failures due to its poor and unusual after taste they did not like.   We wanted to lighten the load a little to reflect the whiter flours used, so only 30% whole grains this time and by reducing the seeds and soaker by 2/3rds to a measly 45%.

 

The flours picked for this loaf were; dark rye, spelt, WW, quinoa, steel cut oats and flax seeds all ground at hole in the little Krups coffee mill and AP.  No potatoes this time because we forgot to add the flakes.  The soaker consisted of; rye, red winter wheat and spelt berries with cracked barley and bulgar.  The seeds included; sunflower, pumpkin, chia, hemp and millet.

 

We also wanted to bake this in the mini oven (MO) and use our new heavy aluminum Goodwill 4 ½ qt  DO’s as a cloche.  We made the largest boule which experience to date says will still fit in the MO.  It doubled in volume while chilling out in the fridge for 12 hours.

Finally the sun came out after 4 days of rain - half a year's worth at my house.

Ian's T-Rex claw poorly slashed this time.

The bread slashed nicely, T-Rex style.  The crust baked up deep brown, blistered and crunchy with the thick crust going soft and chewy as it cooled.  We didn’t expect the crumb to be wildly open due to the 30% whole grains and 45% soaker and seeds but we were happy with the fairly open crumb that was very moist as usual - the YW trademark.

 

Thanks to Hanseata, my favorite hemp seed roae to the top.  Blisters, blisters adn more blisters thanks to MO and the DO.

It sliced well, tasted nutty, meaty and healthy with the quite a bit of seeds and soaker.   These add in’s really made the chew of this bread exceptional – its hallmark.  Hope the wife likes this for her work day sandwiches or we will have to bake up one of our white SD favorites, David Snyder’s Pulgiesi Capriosso or San Joaquin.  But we will have to see how she handles the subtle chicken stock taste which I found perfectly OK - probably because there was no fat or salt in the stock.

 

This bread is more moist and soft than any we have baked before.  The chicken stock comes through in good way and the blistered, chewy MO crust is back!   This is another bread unlike any other.  Just delicious, any way you want it or need it.

Breakfast of this fine bread with dragon fruit and prickly pear cactus tuna, sausage, egg, colby jack cheese and home made English muffin.  The lunch also features this bread with 1/2 ea. peach, mango and plum, cantaloupe chunks, black grapes, cherries, lettuce with feta cheese, brie cheese slices, carrot sticks and a strawberry.  The sandwich bread is spread with home made dijon mustard, then lettuce, tomato, grilled chicken slices, colby jack and brie cheese are piled on.

Method

We used a combo YW and SD starter with 10 g SD seeds taken from the rye sour, desem and multi-grain starters.  We used AP flour for each of the (2) 3 hour and (1) 2 hour levain builds and we built the YW and SD communally, instead of separately, this time.

The soaker was made and set aside for 6 hours by covering the grains with water and microwaving them until the water boiled.  The flours, honey, malts, VWG and salt were autolysed with the chicken stock for 2 ½ hours.  We no longer leave the salt out of the autolyse.

With autolyse complete we mixed it with the levain and kneaded it with the dough hook for 8 minutes on KA 2 until the dough pulled away from the sides of the bowl.  The dough was allowed to rest for 20 minutes covered with plastic.

After resting the first of (3) S & F’s was performed 15 minutes apart on a well oiled surface.  On the 2nd S & F the soaker was drained and dried with a paper towel and incorporated into the dough.  A little bench four was required to get the dough back in shape.  The dough was rested in an oiled, plastic covered bowl.  On the 3rd S & F the seeds were incorporated. 

The dough was then allowed to develop and ferment for 90 minutes before being pre-shaped and then shaped into a boule stretching the skin tight as we piulled ot across the un-floured surface.  The dough ball was placed seam side up in our favorite, larger sized, rice floured basket.  The basket was placed into a tall kitchen trash can liner and retarded in the fridge for 12 hours.

The MO was preheated to 500 F and (1) of Sylvia’s steaming towels in a half water filled Pyrex measuring cup was heated to boiling in the microwave.   We decided to bake the bread on parchment on the unheated, solid, lower portion of the MO’s broiling pan and cover it with the unheated aluminum DO bottom. 

The dough was removed from the fridge and tipped out onto a parchment covered peel, slashed in Ian’s T-Rex Style and slid onto the broiler pan bottom leaving room to cover it with the DO bottom while still leaving room for Sylvia’s steam in the back corner.

The whole cold apparatus, with cold contents, was placed into the MO and a half cup of water was tossed into the bottom of the MO when the door was closed.  When the MO beeped that is was back up to 500 F, about 5 minutes, the temperature was turned down to 450 F and the bread was allowed to steam covered for 20 minutes. When the steam was removed, the bread uncovered and the temperature turned down to 425 F, convection this time.  The bread was moved to the vented top of the broiler pan.

The bread was rotated 180 degrees every 5 minutes until it reached 205 F on the inside – About 15 minutes and 40 minutes total.   The MO was turned off but the boule was left inside it with the door ajar for 10 minutes to further crisp the crust.  It was then moved to a cooling rack for 1 hour until cool.

The formula follows the pix’s as usual.

 

Multi-Grain Sourdough & Yeast Water Combo with Chicken Stock, Soaker & Seeds     
      
Mixed StarterBuild 1Build 2 Build 3Total%
Multi-grain SD Starter **3000305.57%
Yeast Water50005013.74%
AP90403016043.96%
Water40403011030.22%
Total Starter210806035096.15%
** 10 g each Rye Sour, Desem and Multi-Grain Starter  
      
Starter     
Hydration100.00%    
Levain % of Total31.06%    
      
Dough Flour %   
Non - Diastatic Malt20.55%   
Wheat Germ102.75%   
WW256.87%   
Steel Cut Oats102.75%   
Whole Quinoa102.75%   
Spelt 256.87%   
Ground Flax Seed51.37%   
AP25068.68%   
Diastatic Malt20.55%   
Dark Rye256.87%   
Dough Flour364100.00%   
      
Salt71.92%   
Chicken Stock22561.81%   
Dough Hydration61.81%    
      
Total Flour539    
Chicken Stock & Water400    
T. Dough Hydration74.21%    
Whole Grain %31.35%    
      
Hydration w/ Adds74.31%    
Total Weight1,127    
      
Seeds & Adders          %   
VW Gluten6        1.65%   
Honey10        2.75%   
Pumpkin, Sunflower -  20 ea40       10.99%   
Millet, Chia, Hemp Seeds - 15 ea 45      12.36%   
Total101      27.75%   
      
Soaker          %   
WW205.49%   
Rye205.49%   
Cracked Bulgar102.75%   
Cracked Barley102.75%   
Spelt205.49%   
Total Soaker8021.98%   
      
Soaker and Seeds Total45.33%    

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Update:  The round boule was wrapped in parchment and a towel for 30 hours to see what difference it might make.  It cut much cleaner and tasted twice as sour.  A quartered  pix and another one with one of the quarters sliced.

This one is for Ian.  After coming back from China his first bread viciously turned on him and became a disaster.  We have wanted to bake off his wonderful looking Mocha Multi-Grain SD bread for some time.

 

 

He spoke highly of how it tasted and it sure looked tasty even though it didn’t have his newly brewed cherry YW in it.  David Snyder’s take on Horst Bandel’s Black Pumpernickel from a year and half ago popped up this past week.  txfarmer’s chocolate 36 hour baggies from a year ago came up too and they too looked delicious.  Breaducation’s wonderfully over-seeded and add in’s take of Chad Robertson’s Rugbrot appeared.  It was just beautiful.  Then Mebake’s Multi-grain Struan with soaker and seeds showed up.  Very nice indeed.   All were inspirational for this unique bread.

 

 

So, we thought we would combine something from all 5 and commemorate Ian’s recent bread disaster with a long retarded,  ‘Mocha Disaster Chacon’ in multi-grains, mega seeds, super soak with YW and SD combo starter.  You have to pay homage to the bread gods as the Maya did to their gods when it didin't rain enough for their liking and needs.  gods like the attention when things go bad and if you don't comply with a suitable offering then who knows what bad and terrible things will happen to you.  So we hope the bread gods will accept this gift and let Ian's future bakes be fruitful, delicious, well risen with blistered, dark, crispy, thick crust and moist, airy crumbs.

The flours used included durum atta, semolina, dark rye, whole wheat and AP.  The soaker included rye, WW and  spelt berries, buckwheat groats, cracked bulgar and barley, steel cut oats and quinoa.  The seeds included; pumpkin, sunflower, millet, hemp and flax.

  

Ian loves his pistachio oil but we used walnut oil here.  What would an Ian bread be without potatoes?  So we put some in.  Sorry no caramelized onions, I feel a little guilty since they too would have been a nice addition.  In this case, grilled left over red and sweet potatoes were sautéed in butter, olive oil, and herbs.

 

We had some possum pelt and armadillo nectar but decided not to use them thinking they might get lost in the mix.   My apprentice was heartbroken since she had risked life and limb to catch these critters.   We will leave these exotic ingredients and those from the auto parts store to the Ian – the master of bread ingredient combinations, if not, scientific oddities.

These boules were not total disasters, were deeply browned and cracked as Chacons are wont to do.  Sadly, no blisters as Big Old Betsy just doesn't provide them as well as the mini oven does.  Small is beautiful they say and, when it comes to ovens, they are correct. Can’t wait to cut into one to see how open the crumb promises to be - even with 122% soaker and seeds. 

 

Well we didn't wait long.  The crumb was open and so moist.  Had the heel plain and a slice toasted with butter.  Delicious!  Then it was time for lunch.  This bread called for a nice limoncello for lunch, being a special occasion and all-  and some fine pate too.  Life is good.  Another great sunset last night.

The formula follows the pix’s as usual.

 

 The Method

The method for this bread is a little complicated but not difficult if you don’t mind really sticky dough.  The sourdough and yeast water starters were built together ‘en combo', instead of separately, over (2) 3 hour and (1) 2 hour builds.

The SD portion was seeded with 10g each of our rye sour, desem and multi-grain starters.  The levain was then refrigerated overnight for 10 hours.  The next morning it was allowed to come to room temperature before incorporating into the autolyse.

The soaker was made by pouring hot mocha coffee over the mix and allowing it to steep for 6 hours.  The mocha coffee was made by putting 5 heaping teaspoons of Ghirardelli’s Double Chocolate mix in our standard brew.  It was yummy on its own.

The dough, mocha, malts, potato and salt were autolysed for 2 hours.  The levain was added and incorporated into the autolyse in the mixing bowl on KA 2 for 2 minutes and then 2 minutes on KA 3. The dough was allowed to rest, covered, for 30 minutes.

This is sticky dough so it was hand kneaded on a lightly floured surface for 4 minutes until it was smooth.  The dough was allowed to rest for 20 minutes before the first of 3 S&F’s were done 20 minutes apart. The first one should have incorporated the soaker and the 2nd one the seeds.  But I dumped them all in on the first one and then struggled to preserver against impending disaster.

There is a lot of mocha, soaker and seeds in the Mocha Disaster Chacon!  Don’t give up, they will all get in there eventually. I had to add some bench flour and knead the dough to get it to work well for me.  The dough was then allowed develop and ferment for 1 hour in the oiled, covered bowl.

The dough was divided in half for two 800 plus gram boules.  102 g of this was pinched off for a knotted roll that was placed in the middle of the rice floured baskets (a Chacon directive) and the remainder of the dough was formed in the Chacone style and placed over the roll.

The 2nd oblong boule has a knot in the center but, instead of folding the edges up for the remainder of the dough, it was formed into a short fat batard (as opposed to a short, fat ba*tard) with a depression in the middle - just so it wouldn’t look the same as the round but it ended up looking the same anyway.

Once the baskets were loaded, the loaves were allowed to proof on the counter for 90 minutes in a tall kitchen trash can liner before being retarded overnight for 14 hours.  They doubled in fridge – a good sign.

Since it rained last might, it was 75 degrees this morning so we decided to bake these boules off together in the big GE for a change with (2) of Sylvia’s steaming pans in place below the stone.  The oven was preheated to 500 F.

The boules were removed from the fridge and overturned onto a peel covered with parchment – no sticking.  The Chacon never requires scoring since it is allowed to naturally open up as it sees fit.    Into the oven they immediately went, as cold as the fridge could make them.

They didn’t seem to notice the heat.  These boules sprang very well, cracked nicely and baked up deeply brown.   They were steamed for 15 minutes with the temperature being turned down to 450 F after 5 minutes.

The steam was removed at 15 minutes and the temperature turned down to 425 F convection this time.  The Chacons were rotated every 10 minutes until they were done, 205 F inside, about 20 more minutes or 35 minutes total.

The boules were allowed to rest on the stone for another 10 minutes with the oven of and door ajar before being removed to cooling racks.

 

Ian's Mocha Disaster Chacon     
      
Mixed StarterBuild 1Build 2 Build 3Total   %
SD Starter, ( Desem, Multi-grain, Rye)3000305.16%
Yeast Water205007016.83%
Durum Atta10200307.21%
WW20200409.62%
AP00505012.02%
Dark Rye20100307.21%
Water300508019.23%
Total Starter13010010033079.33%
      
Starter     
Hydration100.00%    
Levain % of Total19.84%    
      
Dough Flour      %   
Non - Diastatic Malt30.72%   
Dark Rye5012.02%   
Ground Flax Seed102.40%   
Semolina5012.02%   
Durum Atta5012.02%   
AP20048.08%   
WW5012.02%   
Diastatic Malt30.72%   
Dough Flour416100.00%   
      
Salt92.16%   
Mocha Coffee25661.54%   
Dough Hydration61.54%    
      
Total Flour581    
Mocha Coffee566    
T. Dough Hydration97.42%    
Whole Grain %56.97%    
      
Hydration w/ Adds96.62%    
Total Weight1,663    
      
Soaker         %   
Quinoa204.81%   
Hard Red WW Berries102.40%   
Rye Berries102.40%   
Buckwheat Groats204.81%   
Steel Cut Oats204.81%   
Cracked Bulgar204.81%   
Cracked Barley204.81%   
Spelt Berries102.40%   
Mocha Coffee14534.86%   
Total Scald27566.11%   
      
Add - Ins           %   
Barley Malt Syrup102.40%   
Walnut Oil 102.40%   
Millet & Hemp Seeds - 25 ea5012.02%   
VW Gluten102.40%   
Mashed Grilled Potatoes7217.31%   
Pumpkin & Sunflower - 45 ea9021.63%   
Total23258.17%   
      
(5) heaping tsps of Ghirardelli Double Chocolate Mix   
Soaker + Add in %124.28%    

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

We just love kjknits English Muffin recipe and make it all the time.  Well, we make them when we run out of them - without fail.  We just can’t stand not having them in the freezer. It is just not done.

We always tweak the recipe a little bit.  This time we used 1 ½ C of AP, 1/4 C each of Durum Atta and White Whole Wheat. 

 

We also used 20 G of  multi grain starter (33% each desem, rye and durum atta) that has been in the fridge for at least a week at 65% hydration and 20 g of our yeast water too.

This time we hand formed some of the Muffins and cut some with a plastic glass.  See if you can tell which is which in the pre dry fried and after dry fries shots.

We actually made them the same size as Thomas EM’s (don’t ever look at their ingredient list) by rolling the dough ½” thick this time – ours muight have been a tad taller.

The spring was at least 100% on these fine English Muffins that come out just like Wofferman’s, where I worked as a sack boy what seems like only a couple of years ago when it was really nearly 50.

So soft and tender on the inside when nicely browned on the outside.  Make sure you get them this dark too.  Use a cast iron skillet for best results.

When toasted, buttered and lightly covered in our Dragon Fruit and Prickly Pear Tuna Combo Jam – just delightful for a Sunday morning breakfast.

Try them and you won’t ever buy Thomas’ fine EM’s ever again.

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