The Fresh Loaf

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MNBäcker's picture

Thicker Yogurt?

May 10, 2012 - 7:14am -- MNBäcker
Forums: 

Hi, all.

I am hoping there are some people on the list who maybe make their own yougurt along with baked goods.

I have been making my own for a while - pretty straightforward. In the past, I have added a couple of packets of gelatin (boiled shortly in a little water and then stirred into the hot milk) to my half-gallon of milk, and it really did the trick to thicken the yogurt. HOWEVER, I am now looking to see if a plant-based thickening agent, such as Agar, might be able to do the same job.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

As a follow up to a previous post here is how I make non fat Greek yogurt.  You can make it with any kind of milk you want but I am into non fat where ever possible.  Make your  yogurt cozy for 12 hours at 110 F by placing 2 folded in half kitchen towels over a heating pad set to high which is covering a wooden cutting board.  Get a large bath towel folded in half to cover the kitchen towels. 

Take 1/3 cup of non fat dry milk powder and put it in a 2 quart sauce pan.  Add 1 quart of milk and stir until the powder dissolves.  Turn on high heat and stir constantly with a SS spoon until temperature hits 140 F then turn down heat to medium and cook to 185 F.  Then turn off heat.

Move pot to an ice water bath.  Stir until milk goes doen to 120 degrees.  Remove from ice water and dry the bottom of the pot.  Wait until temperature hits 115 then strir in 2-3 T of plain yogurt that has active cultures listed on the label.  Make sure the yogurt is well disolved.  The temperature will now be around 110 f.  From now on, for the next 12 hours,  you want to keep that temperature as much as possible.

Put the lid on the pot and move it to its warm cozy home for the next 12 hours.  lift off eh large bath towel, place temperature probe on teh top kitchen towel and place the pot on top of the probe.  Cover the pot with the doubled up bath towel and turn the temperature control of the heating pad down to medium.  Do not move the pot or jostle it for the next 12 hours.  Your heating pas may be better or worse so monitor the temp to make sure that it stays in the 105 to 115 F range.   I've had it 5 degrees lower and higher  with no problem. 

After 12 hours, transfer the yogurt to a colander that is lined with a couple of paper towels and set the colander back into the pot you made the yogurt in and  cover the colander with plastic wrap.  Let drain from 1 to 4 hours in teh refrigerator.  I have let it drain overnight too.  The longer, the thicker the yogurt will get.  See previous blog entry for picture of that.  Save the drippings to replace some of the water when you make SD bread to depen the flavor and sour.  Happy Yogurting & Baking!

johannesenbergur's picture
johannesenbergur

Ingredients:

  • 1 dl (100g) lukewarm to warm water
  • ½ dl (50g) plain naturel yogurt
  • 15g fresh active yeast
  • 8 g honey
    (pref. liquid)
  • 10 g sea salt
  • 10 g olive oil
    (this is a minimum, feel free to use more, I reckon 25g would be ideal)
  • 250g various types of flour, I used and recommend:
    30g Graham flour
    70g semolina flour
    150g wheat baking flour
  • Poppy or sesame seeds or for sprinkle

This recipe is very small, the smallest I've ever made. Usually I double the ingredients mentioned, except for the yeast, the dough rises just fine with 15g.

Recipe:

(Work: 20 mins - 1st rise: 30 mins - work: 5 mins - 2nd rise: 35 mins - bake: 30 mins)
Estimated time from start to finish: 2 hours 

Mix the warm water and yogurt, so you get a tepid mixture. Add the yeast and stir till dissolved. Add salt and honey and dissolve. Add the flour to the mixture, I ususally add 100g, mix and add then add more.

Knead the dough for approximately 10 minutes, put it into an oiled container, cover it with a hot teatowel and leave it to rise for 30 mins or so, can be more or less, usually more means better and less means less good.

Should be doubled after half an hour and shape it into a loaf. Place the loaf onto your baking surface of choice. Pat the bread with milk and sprinkle the seeds on top of it. Cover it again with a warm towel and let it rise for 30-60 minutes; Afterwards put the loaf into your oven.

Bake for approximately 30 minutes, until the crust is golden and it makes that hollow sound you know so well, when you knock on the bottom of it.

Enjoy.

johannesenbergur's picture
johannesenbergur

So... time to try something new and the pictures of the pita breads on the right side of TFL has always appealed to me.



Being European, I had to use some other measurements and didn't bother getting the exactly like the recipe, so here's what I did, inspired by http://www.thefreshloaf.com/recipes/pitabread.


Ingredients: (Made 8 pita breads á 50g)


 



  • 1 dl tepid water

  • 15g fresh yeast

  • ½ dl plain natural yogurt (I can't seem to stop using this in my creations)

  • 5g sea salt

  • 5g honey

  • 10g olive oil

  • 50g durum/semolina flour

  • 150g regular wheat baking flour + some for dusting and adding as nessecary.

  • Optional: Spices (I used a tiny bit of ground chilli, smoked paprika and ground cilantro)


 


Mix the yeast with the water, add the yogurt, oil, salt and honey, mix well with a fork, till it's a greyish, oilish mixture.
Add the flour, a little at a time (100g) and stir with the fork as long as it makes sense.


Knead for around 10 mins or so. Let it rise under a luke warm tea towel in a warm place for 30 mins.


Carefully fold and strech the dough, and make a sausage. Cut the dough-sausage into appropriate size lumps, I weighed them and made them 50g. Let the pieces rest and rise for 5 mins.


Use a rolling pin to flatten the dough and hopefully you'll succeed in making them circular as well. Just make it really thin, not paper thin, but 3-5mm thick.


By this time your oven should be really hot (max. heat) and if you have a baking stone (which helps), it should be hot as well. Place the pancake lookalike dough onto the stone and bake them for 3 mins in 200°C or to taste. The breads should blow up like balloons.



Cut them up sidewise and enjoy your pitas.


Filling suggestion:
Garlic and herb roasted shoulder of lamb, sweet corn, tomato, cucumber, salad leaves and hot salsa.


...I'm going to quit blogging now and eat some more...

johannesenbergur's picture
johannesenbergur

Been experimenting a little lately, and so far this is the recipe I'm most satisfied with. Baked it twice already and it's been amazing both times.


 


200g wheat flour
200g durum/semolina flour
40g wheat flour - for dusting and adding if it's too sticky.
15g fresh yeast
200g water
15g sugar
5g sea salt
100g plain natural yogurt
25g oil (preferably olive)
40g carrots.


Peel the skin off the carrots and use your peeler to finely slice bits of the carrot. Chop the carrot slices to reasonable pieces, quite small.


Mix the yeast with the tepid water as usual, add the sugar and salt and mix everything. Add the yogurt, make sure it's about room temperature, if it's too cold, microwave it for a few seconds, add the oil as well.


Get your flour in the bowl, add around 100g at a time and mix with a fork for as long as it makes sense. Get your hands in and start the kneading. The entire dough needs to be kneaded for approximately 10 minutes. While kneading add the carrots, little by little, so they get into the dough.


Get the dough into a bowl and let the dough rise for 6 hours (should quadruple). Get the dough out and handle it really carefully, shape it into loaves or rolls and let it rise under a moist lukewarm clean towel for around 2 hours.


Get your oven to maximum temperature, place the bread in and turn the heat down to 200°C. Bake it to taste or until golden brown. If possible spray milk on the loaf/rolls every once in a while. If possible, use steam while baking.


Expect incredibly light, fluffy and tasty bread.


 



*They are not supposed to be this burned

crazyknitter's picture

soaker: buttermilk/yogurt verses water??

November 1, 2010 - 7:25am -- crazyknitter
Forums: 

I am wondering something.


I made Peter Reinharts' whole wheat bread with soaker and biga.  In the soaker, since I didn't have any buttermilk (and my buttermaker died on me - and I didn't have time to make butter by hand) I used some fresh (but older milk).


My bread turned out wonderful!  I was so pleased.


Well, now that I am back to square one with no butter milk, I am wondering how water will fare in a soaker in my bread?


Can anyone share some insight with me?


 


Becky

Erzsebet Gilbert's picture

Two variations upon yogurt bread... it can be done!

October 7, 2009 - 5:15am -- Erzsebet Gilbert

Hello, everybody!  


This begins with a resounding thank-you to user jannrn for asking a question and giving me an excellent idea...  A week ago, I posted about my Greek Fennel, Yogurt, and Honey Bread, and sweetly Jan told me she liked the photographs but hated fennel (I'm really the only person I know who does!).  She asked about alternate flavors, which got me to thinking...  


Here is a picture of the original fennel bread:

Erzsebet Gilbert's picture

Greek Fennel, Yogurt, & Honey Bread (a traveler returns to her oven!)

October 1, 2009 - 2:36am -- Erzsebet Gilbert
Forums: 

Hello to all the bakers and Loafers!  I'd posted about 5 months ago about my upcoming camping journey around the Mediterranean, and received so much wonderful advice...  I can't thank everybody enough for their kind, helpful ideas, or begin to tell all the traveling tales.  


Apart from a broken camp stove (aaah!) I did discover a number of fantastic, unique local breads, but I will have to wait to post some pictures and descriptions of those (though I promise I will!)...

jeffbellamy's picture
jeffbellamy

I got a comment asking what I meant by proofed Starter. What I mean is you take your sourdough starter out of the refrigerator and feed it and wait until it warms up and is frothy.

 

This assumes you have some starter and know what I'm talking about.

 

If you don't you can create your own starter but you should give yourself a couple of weeks to get it going.

 

You can buy sourdough starters online or you can get some free from Friends of Carl  

 

http://home.att.net/~carlsfriends/.

 

I just pulled some yougurt bread out of the oven (see attached photo).

 

I really didn't measure anything, I just poured the largest part of my starter which I've had out (not in refrigerator) for about a week (feeding it 2-3 times a day). I just started adding flour to it until it came together and estimated about how much salt it would take (never forget the salt).

 

I stuck it out in the garage at about 50 degrees to retard (slow down the rising).

 

My starter was so exuberant at being out of the refrigerator and being fed reguarly that it just about tripled in volume in about eight hours so I folded it to reduce the volume and stuck it in the refrigerator until morning.

 

It was back up to the same volume so I turned it out and formed it on a floured board. I didn't want to wait while it got back to room temp (I was a little worried I'd over proofed it) so I stuck it in a cold cast Iron dutch oven and stuck it in a cold oven and baked at 350 degrees for a hour then checked on it.

 

As expected it had taken this opportunity to rise but had not started to brown at all so I set the oven for 450 degrees and gave it andother 30 minutes.

 

http://i12etu.com

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