The Fresh Loaf

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dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

This is another ‘Post Panettone Levain Build’ bake.  It is amazing how much wasted starter you can; will, end up with when making the Italian levain for panettone!  Not to worry….we came up with another bake that used up all of left over SD and YW levain; 392 g worth, with the exception of 100 g of SD levain we are saving for the Valentine Rose Vienna Bread bake with the Three Twisted Sister GMA’s on Monday.

These near white levains had been in the fridge for a few days and were a little sleepy so we gave them 108 g of our whole Rye, spelt and WW mix with 125 g of water and let it sit out on the heating pad to warm up and get perky again.

  

While the huge, now 625 g YW/SD levain. was waking up, we autolysed the dough flour; half WW and half bread flour with the salt, Toadies, VWG, malts, honey, molasses, and Guinness Black Lager for 2 hours.  The only thing left out were the pumpkin and sunflower seeds.

 

The huge levain ended up being 45% of the total weight if you discount the 100 g of seeds.  This is about 3 times as large as normal for our baking.  Ian uses large levains per Peter Reinhart but I’m not sure he has gone this big!  We have tried this before but forgot what is was like so my apprentice thought this was the perfect time to continue our 'try it and see if we like it' method - our Mikey Technique of bread discovery.

 

Once the autolyse and the levain came together, we did 10 minutes of slap and folds to get this 80% hydration dough to come together.  I wasn’t at all difficult since we had 60% whole grains, most of it whole wheat, which really soaked up the beer.  After 10 minutes the dough had a great feel, was smooth supple and exhibited fine gluten development for higher percentage whole grain bread.

  

 After resting for 15 minutes we did 3 sets of French Folds to incorporate and distribute the seeds and further develop the gluten.  We then let the dough ferment on the counter for an hour before retarding it in the fridge for 12 hours.  It more than doubled in the fridge just like John01473’s  did yesterday.

 

We allowed the dough to warm up on the heating pad for 2 hours before gently shaping it into a batard, loafish, oval shape that would fit nicely into the non stick sprayed, Romertopf, clay baker we got at Goodwill many months ago but never used it to make bread.  It made a fine Sunday Chicken though.  We had soaked the Romertopf in a 5 gallon bucket on the patio for a couple of days waiting for a good time to use it.

 

This bake was also inspired by Raluca’s boldly baked 65% whole wheat bread and lamberta72 buying a Romertopf and Bobkay1022 posting pictures of a very nice bake in his Romertopf  that healso  got at Goodwill like I did!  So it was time to put these additional inspirations together with Ian’s big levain and long bulk retard in the fridge.  It is not too odd, as odd things can go,  how things can come together for a bake with a little Fresh Lofian help.

 

After 4 1/2 hours in the Romertopf for final proofing on the heating pad, the bread was ready to be slashed and baked.  Slashing was made with my favorite French bread slicing knife,  We put the Romertopf in the very cold Old Betsy and fired her up to 460 F.  When she beeped that she was at temperature, we set the timer for 20 minutes of steam.  After 20 minutes we removed the lid and turned the oven down to 425 F, convection this time.

 

After another 10 minutes, rotating every 5 minutes, we removed the bread from the Romertopf and placed it on the stone and continued rotating it every 5 minutes to ensure even browning.  15 minutes later we turned the oven down to 400 F; convection and tented the top with aluminum foil to keep it from browning too much.  The bread reached 205 F 15 minutes later after a total baking time of exactly 1 hour after the oven beeped when reaching the original 460 F.

 

There was no reason to crisp the crust on the stone for 10 minutes with the door ajar and the oven off as this bread was very brown and crust crisp as all get out.   It was certainly a looker from the outside and the rise and spring were very good indeed.  We are impressed with the Romertopf, as much as we are impressed with Ian’s large levain, bulk retard, warm, shape and proof method.  If the inside is as good as the outside this should be one of those bakes we look forward to doing again.

 

The crumb wasn't as open as the rise, spring and bloom would have us believe but the crumb was light and moist with lots of smaller holes that must have added up to the rise and spring we saw on the outside.   Sometimes bread can fake you out.  It also tastes well rounded and has a deeply flavorful profile.  There is a slight SD tang that was muted by the YW.  The seeds came though nicely too.   All in all, it is  a very nice WW sandwich bread which is what we were after.  I'm sure my wife will love this for her lunch sandwiches - I know I will.  It is good be nearly out of panettone levain too - only  100 g to go:-)

It's a grilled pepper jack,  brie with pastrami cheese sandwich.  Great bread makes great sandwiches!  And don't forget the salad and fresh fruit, citrus, melon and veggies with a home made pickle.

If you eat right you can have some lemon cheese cake with chocolate sandwich cookie crust once in a while.

Formula

Big Combo Whole   Wheat Multi-grain Bread with Pumpkin and Sunflower Seeds

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Starter Build

Build 1

Build 2

Build 3

Total

%

WWW & AP SD Starter

30

0

0

30

3.97%

Yeast Water

80

0

0

80

10.60%

Rye

0

0

0

0

0.00%

WW

0

0

36

36

4.77%

Spelt

0

15

36

51

6.75%

Dark Rye

0

15

36

51

6.75%

White Whole Wheat

66

0

0

66

8.74%

AP

66

40

0

106

14.04%

Water

50

30

125

205

27.15%

Total

292

100

233

625

82.78%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Combo Starter Totals

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

325

43.05%

 

 

 

Water

300

39.74%

 

 

 

Starter Hydration

92.31%

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

42.26%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

Red Malt

3

0.40%

 

 

 

Toadies

10

1.32%

 

 

 

Vital Wheat Gluten

15

1.99%

 

 

 

White Malt

2

0.26%

 

 

 

Bread Flour

200

26.49%

 

 

 

Whole Wheat

200

26.49%

 

 

 

Total Dough Flour

430

56.95%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

12

1.59%

 

 

 

Guinness Black Lager

290

38.41%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration w/o   starter

67.44%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

 

Sunflower, Pumpkin 50   ea

100

13.25%

 

 

 

Molasses $ Honey

22

2.91%

 

 

 

Total

122

16.16%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour w/ Starter

755

 

 

 

 

Total Beer & Water   w/ Starter

590

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Starter   & Adds

79.60%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

1,479

1,295

Finished Weight

% Whole Grain

60.77%

 

 

 

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

This is yet another bread, and one still to go,  that resulted from the panettone bake where huge excesses of levain waste was required to build the Italian starter.  In this case we had some YW and SD levain hanging around in the fridge.  But the first thing we did was boil the scald for 5 minutes stirring all the time before covering and allowing it to cool on the counter.

  

The levain build was like a French casserole where any veggie in the fridge goes into the pot.  The two leftover levains, some more AP flour and some more YW and SD seed went into this levain casserole.   We’ve never zombied a levain like this before so it was fun, if not eventful, from a risen dead perspective.

 

The levain sat on the heating pad as we autolysed everything including the cocoa and instant coffee, except the scald and seeds, with the Guinness Black Lager- a beer we hadn’t tasted before.  This ended up being a 58% Whole grain loaf not including the whole grain scald and soak.  After two hours we deemed the autolyse ready for its zombie levain.

 

After mixing with a spoon to get things acquainted, we did 10 minutes of French Slap and folds to develop the gluten sufficiently.  After a 20 minute rest we incorporated the multigrain scald using a few S&F’s and a few slap and folds to get the dough back into shape.

  

The addition of the wet scald, that took the hydration up to what felt like about 82% or more, made the dough much slacker than its old self.  After another 20 minute rest, the aromatic seeds were incorporated into the dough with some more S&F’s and a few slap and folds which were more interesting with seeds and wet dough flying all over the place.

  

After another 20 minute rest we did one last set of slap and folds to get some shape into the dough and immediately  panned it into a large loaf pan that had been de-stickified with spray. We coverd the top with wheat adn oat bran and let it sit on the heating pad for about 3 hours until it had grown 3/4th of the way up the tin and then we retarded it for 12 hours.

When we retrieved it from the fridge it had risen to within ½” of the top of the tin rim.  We let it sit on the counter, no heating pad this time, for 2 1/2 hours before heating up the mini oven with Sylvia’s steaming cup.

 

The dough had risen to the rim by the time it went into the mini for 12 minutes of steam at 450 F.  It sprang about 1/2 “under steam.  Then we removed the steam and turned the heat down to 375 F, convection this time.

We continued to bake the loaf until it reached 205 F on the inside rotating the loaf 180 degrees after 10 minutes and also de-panning it to ensure even baking.  After 10 minutes we rotated the de-panned loaf again.  A total of 45 minutes and the loaf was done.

It browned up nicely but we will have to wait for the crumb shots.  Once cooled we will let this bread sit for 24 hours before cutting into it for lunch tomorrow.  Here it is the following morning and I couldn't wait for lunch since there was breakfast first :-) 

Plain, toasted with butter or with cream cheese... this bread is tasty - just plain delicious.  The crumb is open, glossy and very moist with chewy bits.  The crust went soft overnight which allowed for very thin slicing without crumbling.   I could eat this bread every day and if stranded on a desert isle, it would be one of the 50 breads my apprentice would lug along.  Can't wait to try it toasted with pate.

Formula

Starter Build

Build 1

Total

%

Rye, Spelt & WW SD Starter

25

25

5.61%

Whole Wheat

12

12

2.69%

Dark Rye

13

13

2.92%

AP

50

50

11.22%

Yeast Water

38

38

8.53%

Water

37

37

8.31%

Total

175

175

8.53%

 

 

 

 

SD Starter Totals

 

%

 

Flour

87.5

19.64%

 

Water

87.5

19.64%

 

Starter Hydration

100.00%

 

 

Levain % of Total

18.88%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

Rye

25

5.61%

 

Spelt

25

5.61%

 

Oat

25

5.61%

 

Quinoa

25

5.61%

 

AP

150

33.67%

 

Kamut

25

5.61%

 

Red Malt

5

1.12%

 

Toadies

5

1.12%

 

White Malt

3

0.67%

 

Whole Wheat

25

5.61%

 

9 Grain Cereal

25

5.61%

 

Potato Flakes

10

2.24%

 

Ground Flax Seed

10

2.24%

 

Total Dough Flour

358

80.36%

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

8

1.80%

 

Black Guiness Lager

250

56.12%

 

Dough Hydration w/ Starter

69.83%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Scald & Soak

 

%

 

Kamut

15

3.37%

 

Spelt

15

3.37%

 

Rye

15

3.37%

 

Whole Wheat

15

3.37%

 

9 Grain Cereal

10

2.24%

 

Toadies

5

1.12%

 

Red Malt

5

1.12%

 

Flax Seed

5

1.12%

 

Total Scald & Soak

85

19.08%

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

Anise & Coriender

5

1.12%

 

Instant Coffee & Cocoa Powder

20

4.49%

 

Barley Malt & Molasses

20

4.49%

 

Black & Brown Caraway

6

1.35%

 

Total

51

11.45%

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour w/ Starter

445.5

 

 

Total Water w/ Starter

337.5

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Starter & Adds

78.00%

 

 

Total Weight

927

 

 

% Whole Grain Not Including Scald

58.47%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

isand66's picture
isand66

I think the name of this bread is probably the longest one I've ever used or seen for that matter!  There are just too many things thrown in this latest bake to make it any shorter and do the bread justice.

Recently I made a durum yeast water/sour dough combo bread using separate starters for the yeast water part and for the sour dough part.  I was urged by a few of my baking friends, DA and Janet to try making 1 starter using my AP sourdough seed along with the Yeast Water instead of water, plus the  flour.

I also wanted to use some of the fresh roasted pumpkin seeds I picked up at the market the other day along with trying some millet flour I also purchased at the same time.  Oh, and I forgot I also picked up a bottle of Nut Brown Ale and I had roasted some sweet potatoes so in they went into the cauldron.

I built the starter over 2 builds using French Style flour and Dark Rye flour which I thought would make this a nice hearty and deep flavored bread once the ale and other ingredients were added.

The dough ended up very wet which contributed to the nice moist crumb along with the addition of the sweet potatoes.  You can really taste the dark brown ale in this one and overall I was very happy with the outcome.

I used a basket I picked up recently which gave the dough a very fancy pattern.  It was almost too nice to score the bread but I forced myself to wield the knife never the less.

If you decide you want to make this and don't have any Yeast Water brewing, just use water instead when building your sour dough levain.

Procedure

Yeast Water-Sour Dough Starter Build 1

50 grams AP Starter at 65% Hydration

100 grams French Style  Flour (KAF) (note: you can substitute Bread Flour or AP Flour if necessary)

50 grams Yeast Water Starter

50 grams Water

Mix the flour, water and Yeast Water in a bowl until thoroughly combined.  Cover the bowl and let it sit at room temperature for around 6-10 hours.  The starter should almost double when ready to proceed to build 2.

Build 2

Add ingredients below to starter from above and mix until incorporated.  Cover with plastic wrap and let sit at room temperature for 6-10 hours.  You can then use it immediately or refrigerate for a day until ready to mix the final dough.

50 grams French Style Flour

80 grams Dark Rye Flour

160 grams Yeast Water

Main Dough Ingredients

395 grams Starter from Above

180 grams French Style Flour (KAF) (You can use AP Flour or Bread Flour to substitute)

150 grams Millet Flour (Bob's Red Mill)

150 grams Dark Rye (also known as Pumpernickel)

60 grams Rye Chops

60 grams Malted Wheat Flakes

270 grams Sweet Potatoes (Roasted and mashed with a fork)

60 grams Roasted Pumpkin Seeds

16 grams Seas Salt or Table Salt

20 grams Olive Oil

375 grams Water (80-90 degrees F.)

Procedure

Build your Yeast Water levain-Sourdough combo starter the day before you are ready to bake.

On baking day, mix the flours, rye chops, malted wheat flakes and the Ale (make sure the Ale is at room temperature).  Mix on low-speed in your stand mixer or by hand for about 1 minute until the ingredients are combined.  Let the dough autolyse for about 20 minutes to an hour.

Next add the levain, sweet potatoes, oil and the salt and mix for 3 minutes on low.  After 3 minutes add the pumpkin seeds  and mix for about 1 minute until incorporated.  The dough will barely come together and be almost soupy.  Place the dough in a slightly oiled bowl and do a couple of stretch and folds.  Cover the bowl and let it rest for 10-15 minutes.  Do another stretch and fold in the bowl and let it rest another 10-15 minutes.  Do another stretch and fold and let the dough sit out in the covered bowl for another 1.5 hours  (You may need to do a few more S & Fs to build enough gluten development).  Place the dough in the refrigerator until ready to bake the next day.

When ready to bake take the dough out and leave it covered in your bowl for 1.5 to 2 hours.  Next either make one large boule or  divide the dough into 2 loaves and either place in a banneton or from into batards and let them rest in floured couches for 1.5 - 2 hours.

About one hour before ready to bake, set your oven for 500 degrees F.and make sure you prepare it for steam.  I have a baking stone on the top shelf and the bottom and use a heavy-duty rimmed baking pan that I pour 1 cup of boiling water into right as I put the loaves into the oven.

Score the loaves as desired.

When ready to bake place the loaves into your oven on  your oven stone with steam and lower the temperature immediately to 450 degrees.  It should take around 30 minutes to bake  until the breads  are golden brown and reached an internal temperature of 200 - 205 degrees F.

Let the loaves cool down for at least 2 hours or so before eating as desired.

So how many cats are in this house?

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

We had some left over YW levain from out panettone bake we will try to pull off today.  Rather than toss it we decided to make a baguette so we could practice our slashing and have some bread for tonight’s bruschetta.

The levain was20 god SD seed and50 gof YW that eventually totaled 160 g at 75% hydration with 50% of the flour rye, WW and spelt with  the remainder AP.   The levain was a 3 step build 4 hours apart.  The dough flour was 40 grams of the whole meal mix plus 240 g of AP along with 185 g of water and 10 g of salt. 

 

The total weight was 640 g and the total hydration was 66.25%.  With such a low hydration you can tell we weren’t going for holes and didn’t want bruschettta falling through them. 

We autolysed the dough flour for 2 hours and after mixing everything together we did 10 minutes of French slap and folds letting the dough rest for 20 minutes and the did 3 French folds every 20 minutes.  We let the dough rest for 20 minutes and shaped it into a 16” long fat baguette and let it proof in a basket for 2 hours before firing up Big Old Betsy. 

 

We should have let this dough double in volume – probably 4-6 hours but we didn’t have room in the fridge for it and time had run out so we baked it 2 ¾ hours after it hit final proof at 450 F with steam.  After 12 minutes we removed the steam and turned down the oven to 425 F, convection this time and continued to bake the baguette for 10 more minutes until the inside hit 208 F.

It browned up nicely and bloomed but no spring.  We didn’t expect much which is what we got on the inside.  Pretty dense crumb with a few small holes,  I’m sure it would have been fine if rested in the fridge for 24 hours and then allowed to finish proofing on the counter before baking.

This should warn others if you don’t have time don’t waste it by baking something that isn’t ready just because you wanted to use up some starter.  Always make sure that you have room in the fridge for a retard if you run out of time - especially if you are making  YW baggie.

 

isand66's picture
isand66

Since I had some leftover Durum YW starter from my last bake I decided to make English Muffins again.  I followed the same recipe I used the last time but this time the starter was 100% Durum flour and I used my European style flour from KAF for the main dough.  Similar to last time I used Greek Yogurt (2%) and I added some Cheddar cheese as well.

The end results were exactly what I expected with a nice open crumb and flavor as good as any English Muffin I have had before.

English Muffins Main Dough

165 grams Wild Yeast Water Durum Starter (you can use your regular Sourdough starter at 65% hydration instead if desired)

620 grams European Style Flour (KAF or use Bread Flour with a little Whole Wheat)

300 grams Greek Plain Yogurt (I used Fage 2%)

235 grams Water (85-90 degrees F.)

50 grams Cheese (I used grated Cheddar.  Add in final mix)

26 grams Sugar

10 grams Salt

12 grams Baking Soda

Semolina or Cornmeal for Dusting

Directions

Mix flour, starter and yogurt in your mixing bowl and mix for 1-2 minutes to combine.

Cover the bowl and let it sit out at room temperature overnight or for at least 9-10 hours.

The next morning add the rest of the ingredients and mix for a minute.  Knead the dough either with your mixer or by hand for around 4 minutes, adding additional flour if necessary.  Next roll out the dough to about 3/4" thickness on your work surface.  You will have to put some bench flour on the work surface to prevent the dough from sticking.  Using  4" biscuit cutter or can, cut the muffins out and place on a pan lined with parchment paper dusted with corn meal or semolina flour.  You should end up with 5-6 muffins.  If necessary you can combine the scraps and roll out again but you may need to let it rest before rolling.

Cover the muffins with a clean misted or floured towel and let rest for 1 hour at room temperature.

Heat your griddle or heavy skillet to medium or around 350 degrees  and when ready to cook spray some cooking spray on the cooking surface before placing the English Muffins in the pan.

Cover the pan to create some steam and let cook for around 5 minutes or until the bottoms are nice and brown.  Flip and cook another 5 minutes and remove to a baking rack to cool.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

This bake was similar to the last one with a few additions.  We added some spelt and rye upping the whole grains to 60%.  We upped the water roux another 40% or so because we liked the last bake so much and 40 percent more of fine tasting has to be teeth dropping,.  We added aromatic seeds including coriander, anise, black and brown caraway and fennel.  We also put in some pumpkin and sunflower seeds and some pistachio nuts.

 

Since this bread got larger and more weighty, we decided to make a boule instead of a loaf and hope to be able to turn it out into a round cake pan before putting it into the hot MagnaWare turkey roaster.

  

This bread is even wetter than the last one, in the very high 70’s at least and we didn’t want it to spread out too much so, the cake pan would have been useful to hold the boule together and keep the spread to a minimum but it wouldn't fit.

  

We stuck to the 4 and 40 hour method of the last bake hoping the extra whole grains wouldn’t cause the loaf to ferment too much in the fridge.  After 24 hours it looked fine so we cross our fingers and hope that it will hold up after the last loaf over proofed.

  

This time we will bake this bread cold out of the fridge hoping to catch it before this one can over proof.  Since we had so much add ins to incorporate, we divided them into 3 separate adds – one for each S&F.  The scald went in first followed by the aromatic seeds and then by the rest of the seeds and pistachios all 15 minutes apart.

 

Also trying to keep the bread from over proofing, instead of an hour of ferment on the counter after S&F’s and  after shaping we cut these down to 30 minutes each.  And instead of S&F’s this dough was so wet we did French swlap and folds to incorporate the add ins instead.  It is really weird to have an apprentice speaking French with a German accent.

The bread un-molded easily onto parchment that was lowered after a quick T-Rex slash into a cold aluminum DO.  The DO was placed into a cold oven that was set for 450 F.  When the beeper went off (about 20 minutes later), saying the oven was at temperature, we set the timer for 25 minutes of steaming woth the lid on. 

After 25 minutes we took the lid off and turned the oven down to 425 F convection this time.  5 minutes later we took the bread out of the CO and placed it on the stone where it hit 205 F on the inside in 6 minutes.  Total time in the oven cold and hot was right at 56 minutes. 

We let the boule crisp on the stone in an off oven with the door ajar for 10 minutes.  Can’t wait to cut into this bread because the smell off the aromatic seeds is quite nice and near intoxicating.  I was hoping to wait 24 hours to cut this bread open but ……

Sadly, this bread also had little spring and bloom but it didn’t collapse either – just like the last bake.  It may be that the 40 hour retard is too much when using a YW and SD levain in conjunction with a biga and Tang Zhong.  That is the great thing about bread.  With a baseline established there is no telling what might be possible.

Janet's mash with the whole multi-grains and 3 yeast boosters, seeds nuts and scald really made this bread taste fantastic.  If you were stranded on an island this is the bread you would want to take with you.  I thought the last batch was tasty but this puts it to shame. the aromatic seeds really put it over the top.  The crumb isn't as open as the last bake but this one is more glossy and it has way more whole grains that we love so much.  My apprentice finds it much more difficult to eat holes anyway.... and this bread is plenty airy enough as it is.

Formula

Starter Build

Build 1

Build 2

Total

%

WWW & AP SD Starter

10

 

10

1.83%

White Whole Wheat

62.5

 

62.5

11.42%

Spelt

0

30

30

5.48%

Dark Rye

0

30

30

5.48%

AP

62.5

 

62.5

11.42%

Yeast Water

75

 

75

13.70%

Water

50

 

50

9.13%

Total

185

60

320

20.09%

 

 

 

 

 

SD Starter Totals

 

%

 

 

Flour

172.5

31.51%

 

 

Water

130

23.74%

 

 

Starter Hydration

75.36%

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

24.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

Red Malt

2

0.37%

 

 

Toadies

6

1.10%

 

 

Vital Wheat Gluten

5

0.91%

 

 

White Malt

2

0.37%

 

 

Rye

90

16.44%

 

 

Spelt

90

16.44%

 

 

AP

180

32.88%

 

 

Total Dough Flour

375

68.49%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

9

1.64%

 

 

Dough Soaker Water

245

44.75%

 

 

Dough Hydration w/   Starter

65.33%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Scald & Soak

 

%

 

 

Spelt

50

9.13%

 

 

Rye

50

9.13%

 

 

Total Scald & Soak

100

18.26%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

Sunflower, Pumpkin 20   ea

40

7.31%

 

 

Pistachio

30

5.48%

 

 

Barley Malt

17

3.11%

 

 

Coriander, Black &   Brown Caraway

15

2.74%

 

 

Anise 5, Fennel 5

10

1.83%

 

 

Tang Zhong

190

34.70%

 

 

Total

302

55.16%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour w/ Starter

547.5

 

 

 

Total Water w/ Starter

375

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Starter   & Adds

70.05%

 

 

 

Total Weight

1,334

 

 

 

% Whole Grain

60.70%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tang Zhong not included   in hydration calculations includes

 

12.5 g each Spelt and Rye and 10 g Oat w/ 175 g of water

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

I had some KA WWW flour that was almost 8 months old hanging around doing nothing.  We like whole grains around here mostly but needed to get rid of the WWW in some kind of bread.  We hate throwing flour away for any reason if possible even if it flour we don’t use much.

 

We also wanted to try out the water roux method by using 25 g of flour mixed with 125 g of water and cooked on the stove top until it sets up like a thick gravy.  It weighed 135 g when done.  The roux was not used in the hydration calculations in the formula.  We also made a scald with wheat berries and saved the soaker water for the liquid in the dough.

  

After reading lumos’s post on adding a pinch of yeast to his last baguette post  we decided to go all in on a 3 way leavening by making a quick 4 hour poolish with50 gof autolyse and a pinch of yeast along with separately prepared YW and SD starters.  This is a first, at least for us if you include my faithful apprentice Lucy, at making a triple threat leavening for one loaf of bread

  

We were into 4’s so after we did the 4 hour scald and 4 hour poolish we did the 4 hour autolyse with the soaker water and the rest of the non leavening and  soaker ingredients.   After all of these 4’s we decided to continue with them a little longer.

 

We thought we would limit ourselves to a 4 hour maximum, after the autolyse met the leavens, before the finished dough hit the fridge, panned up, for a 40 hour retard as has been our norm of late.

 

After mixing them together with a spoon we let the dough sit for 15 minutes before starting 12 minutes of French slap and folds.  By the time you take out the time for scraping up the counter a sew times we figure we had about 10 good minutes of slapping and folding the dough around and it made a beautifully smooth ball when formed.

 

We then let the dough sit for 15 minutes before doing the first of 3 S&F’s that were performed 15 minutes apart.  We incorporated the scalded and soaked wheat berries on the first set and they were fairly distributed after the 3rd.

Red sky in the mnorning , baker take warning. 

We let the dough rest for 1 hour to ferment and develop before panning it up using S&F’s to try to corral this wet dough into something resembling a loaf.   Even though the dough hydration is low at 68% it really is much wetter with the roux and scald contributing extra water. It felt like a high 70’s hydration and the reason we panned it. 

We let it proof for 1 hour on the counter, in a used trash can liner (for bread only), before placing the tin of dough in the fridge for its anticipated slow proofing for 40 hours.

My apprentice gets all excited when we try something new and is always skeptical that her master can pull off these odd bakes we seem to make on the fly.   With a water roux included and an added commercial pinch poolish, her master wasn’t too sure that a 40 hour retard could be met either in all truthfulness.

You don’t know for sure how things will work out till you do and my apprentice thought we, meaning I,  could always keep and eye out for the dough to double and bake it off ahead of time if required, if we weren’t asleep - and my apprentice is asleep nearly 16 hours a day it seems.  But, it looked OK after its long proofing rest and had risen just above the lip of the tin and near ready for the oven.

We decided to bake off the loaf in the big oval Magnalite Turkey Roaster like we do some tinned other breads on occasion.  It can really do steam with the trivet insert and water on the bottom.  It puts the best crust on bread that we have discovered to date.

We took the dough out of the fridge to warm up a little and finish proofing for and hour before Betsy was fired up to heat the roster to 450 F.  The loaf was slashed right before the tin went in the roaster with a half a cup of water.  The lid went on and the roaster went back in the oven.

We steamed the bread for 15 minutes before taking the lid off, removing the bread and let it continue baking at 425 F, convection this time,  another 10 minutes.  We rotated the tin 180 degrees every 5 minutes to ensure even browning.  We also removed the bread  from the tin at the 30 minute mark and finished the baking on the oven rack.

The bread did not spring at all in the roaster or out of it but it or bloom at the cut either.  It did blister and browned up as expected though.  Well. At least it didn’t over-proof so much that it fell when slashed or in the oven.  40 hours with 2 levains  adn poolish working must have been too much for it even though it only rose to the rim of the pan. 

Can’t wait for the bread to cool and slice to see how it compares to our normal boule crumb for this kind of bread after adding in a water roux and a 3rd leaving with the 4 hour poolish. 

It is now sliced and eaten.  Just delicious.  Very wheaty in taste.  The crumb was pretty open for a bread with whole grains and so much soaker.  It had to be the 3 leavens working together.  they couldn't get it to spring and bloom but the crumb was moist as can be, tasty and chewy with the soaker.  This is a really =nice sandwich bread that can be sliced very thin which is great for those of us who need to watch out bread intake.  We like it a lot.  Toasted with butter is a dream come true.

Formula

Combo YW & SD   Starter

Build 1

Total

%

WWW & AP SD Starter

10

10

1.94%

White Whole Wheat

62.5

62.5

12.14%

AP

62.5

62.5

12.14%

Yeast Water

75

75

14.56%

Water

50

50

9.71%

Total

185

260

35.92%

 

 

 

 

SD Starter Totals

 

%

 

Flour

130

25.24%

 

Water

130

25.24%

 

Starter Hydration

100.00%

 

 

Levain % of Total

 

23.34%

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

Red Malt

2

0.39%

 

Toadies

6

1.17%

 

Vital Wheat Gluten

5

0.97%

 

White Malt

2

0.39%

 

White Whole Wheat

185

35.92%

 

AP

185

35.92%

 

Total Dough Flour

385

74.76%

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

9

1.75%

 

 

 

 

 

Soaker Water

225

43.69%

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

58.44%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

Water Roux

135

26.21%

 

Total

135

26.21%

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour w/ Starter

515

 

 

Total Water w/ Starter

355

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Starter   & Adds

68.93%

 

 

Total Weight

1,114

 

 

% Whole Grain

54.17%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Water Roux is not   included in hydration calculations

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

The last bake was so nice and this one is very similar except for a few differences that….. made a difference.  The sprouts, seeds, nuts, prunes and dough flours were nearly identical except we ran out of barley berries.

  

Yeast water replaced the SD starter.  The YW levain used white whole wheat flour as half of the mix instead of the home milled whole grains of the previous bake.  The amount of whole grains and the hydration was increased 5% to 59% and 74% respectively.

  

The first 15 minutes of the bake was at 500 F instead of 450 F (because we forgot to turn it down after the pre-heat) and the resulting total bake time was reduced 15 minutes to 35 minutes.  We think the higher initial temperatures reduced the spring and the higher hydration caused the chacon to spread more as well.   The openness of the crumb was affected in that the usually large holes of the yeast water were muted .

  

Another change was that instead of putting the dough into the basket right after the  S& F was complete and then allowing the dough to ferment in the basket, on the counter for 1 and ½ hours before being retarded, this dough was allowed to ferment in the bowl for 1 ½ hours before being placed in the basket and then it was then immediately retarded.

 

Both bakes had a 40 hour retard and a 4 hour warm up on the heating pad before baking.  Instead of using decorative knots in the chacon we used balls instead since the dough was too slack to make into ropes without adding some flour. 

We were going to add some aromatic seeds like coriander and anise but forgot to put them in.   I thought that if we just put them on the top they would burn after seeing the color of the crust after yesterday’s bake. 

 

One thing we noticed was since the dough was much wetter it absorbed the rice flour in the basket so the white surface outlines of the last bake were mainly gone and we had a better picture of the deep, dark, mahogany color that must have been under the white on the last bake.

 

The crumb is more moist than the SD as was expected since YW makes a more moist crumb in bread than SD for some reason.  Glad we baked this to 206 F instead of 203 F like the SD version since it was still moist and soft.

The crumb is as open as the SD but the largest holes are in the YW version.  The most uniform holes holes are in the SD.  I never thought I would say this but, the YW multi-grain bread is more tasty, at least to my pallet which is quite unlike the Brownman I know and my apprentice loves sometimes :-)  Both breads are terrific ans some of the best that have come out of this kitchen.

Formula

YW Starter

Build 1

Total

%

White Whole Wheat

100

100

29.41%

AP

25

25

7.35%

Yeast Water

100

100

29.41%

Total Starter

225

225

66.18%

 

 

 

 

Starter

 

 

 

Hydration

80.00%

 

 

Levain % of Total

21.29%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

Toady Tom's Tasty   Toasted Tidbits

5

1.47%

 

Red Malt

3

0.88%

 

White Malt

3

0.88%

 

Buckwheat

24

7.06%

 

Quinoa

24

7.06%

 

Whole Wheat

24

7.06%

 

Spelt

24

7.06%

 

Kamut

24

7.06%

 

Dark Rye

24

7.06%

 

Potato Flakes

20

5.88%

 

Oat Flour

20

5.88%

 

AP

145

42.65%

 

Dough Flour

340

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

7

1.51%

Of Total Flour

Soaker & Sprout   Water

240

70.59%

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

70.59%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

465

 

 

YW 100. Sprout and   Soaker Water

340

 

 

Total Dough Hydration

73.12%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

74.19%

 

 

Total Weight

1,057

 

 

 

 

 

 

Whole Grains

59.14%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Scald

 

%

 

WW

12.5

3.68%

 

Rye

12.5

3.68%

 

Quinoa

12.5

3.68%

 

Kamut

12.5

3.68%

 

Buckwheat

12.5

3.68%

 

Spelt

12.5

3.68%

 

Total Scald

75

22.06%

 

 

 

 

 

Multigrain Sprouts

 

%

 

Kamut

12.5

3.68%

 

Quinoa

12.5

3.68%

 

Buckwheat

12.5

3.68%

 

Rye

12.5

3.68%

 

WW

12.5

3.68%

 

Spelt

12.5

3.68%

 

Total Sprouts

75

22.06%

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

Sunflower 15, Pumpkin   15. Prune 20

50

14.71%

 

Pistachio 15, Filbert   20

35

10.29%

 

Barley Malt

10

2.94%

 

Total

95

27.94%

 

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

The last two bakes were a lower and then a higher percentage of whole grains  and more complex that this one at 48% whole grains.   We also used the KA mixer on speed 3 to knead the dough for 8 minutes instead of using French slap and folds and we baked the bread in a DO instead of on a stone with steam.

 

The rye sour and YW combo levain consisted of dark whole rye and water that was built over 10 hours with (2) 1 hour stages and one of 8 hours. After the levain had doubled we refrigerated it for 12 hours and then let it come to room temperature the next day for 2 hours as we autolysed the flours.

  

The AP, spelt, whole wheat, rye, potato flakes, oat flour ground flax seeds, baked potato, malts and Toady Tom’s Toasted Tidbits were autolysed with the Baltika #6 Porter and home made red wine vinegar for 2 hours before combining with the salt and the levain in the KA for kneading.

  

The dough was rested for 20 minutes and then 4 sets of S&F’s were done on 20 minute intervals.  The caraway and coriander seeds along with a new ingredient; caraway leaves and roasted re=hydrated onions were incorporated on the 3rd set.

 

The rye, spelt and ww sprout chits were incorporated on the 4th set.  Don’t forget to start your ww sprouts 48 hours ahead and the rye and spelt seeds 24 hours ahead to make sure they all chit together and are ready when needed.  Also take the 1 T of dried onions and roast them for a couple of minutes at 350 F to get them dark, not burned like I did the first time,  and then re-hydrate them in 3 T of water 4 hours ahead of time.

 

After the 4th set of S&f’S the dough was allowed to develop and ferment for 1 hour before being pre shaped and shaped into a boule and placed into a rice floured basket inside a trash can liner where it was allowed to ferment for another hour before being retarded for 8 hours in the fridge.

 

The dough was then allowed to come to room temperature and ferment and develop some more on the counter the next day for 6 hours since the temperature in the kitchen is only 67 F. 

 

The oven was preheated to 450 F.  The basket was upended into the cold DO, poorly scored (can’t seem to ever do it right in a DO), and placed into the hot oven that was immediately turned down to 425 F where the bread steamed itself for 25minutes.  Then the lid was removed and the bread baked for another 20 minutes.

  

10 minutes after the lid came off the bread was removed from the DO and continued to bake directly on the oven rack.  The bread was also rotated 180 degrees every 5 minutes until it reached 205 F on the inside.  The bread was allowed to crisp on the oven rack for 10 minutes with the oven off and door ajar before being moved to the cooling rack.  It sure smells tasty.

 

The crumb came out open and moist with a great chew due to the sprouts.  The taste was very good.  Instead of the dominate onion taste like last time, we had a caraway flavor that came through due to the caraway leaves and not the caraway seeds.  This is what Americans would call rye bread even though rye only makes up about 27% of the flours used in the bread.  We really like the way this bread tastes.  It is complex and earthy.  The combination of whole rye being twice as much as whole spelt and WW and the whole grains making up 50% of the flours is one we like very much.  The YW and SD levain combination also helps to lighten the crumb and open it up thanks to the YW while still getting a SD taste to come through too.

Formula

Mixed Starter

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

SD Starter

10

0

0

10

1.75%

Yeast Water

0

60

0

60

13.73%

Dark Rye

30

60

40

130

29.75%

Water

30

0

40

70

16.02%

Total Starter

70

120

80

270

61.78%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Starter

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration

100.00%

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

23.62%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

Spelt

42

9.61%

 

 

 

WW

42

9.61%

 

 

 

Dark Rye

34

7.78%

 

 

 

Toady Tom's Toasted Tidbits

10

2.29%

 

 

 

Red Malt

2

0.46%

 

 

 

White Malt

2

0.46%

 

 

 

Potato Flakes

10

2.29%

 

 

 

Ground Flax Seed

10

2.29%

 

 

 

Oat Flour

10

2.29%

 

 

 

AP

275

62.93%

 

 

 

Dough Flour

437

100.00%

 

 

 

Salt

9

2.06%

1.67% total weight of flour

Baltika Porter

290

66.36%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

66.36%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

572

 

 

 

 

Porter 290 & Water

425

 

 

 

 

Total Dough Hydration

74.30%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

76.92%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

1,193

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Whole Grains

48.43%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sprouts

 

%

 

 

 

WW

15

3.43%

 

 

 

Rye

30

6.86%

 

 

 

Spelt

15

3.43%

 

 

 

Total Sprouts

60

13.73%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

 

Barley Malt

10

2.29%

 

 

 

Caraway and Coriander

12

2.75%

 

 

 

Total

32

7.32%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1 tsp Dried Minced Onion - Baked

 

 

 

 

Brown @ 350 F, Re-hydrated & Drained

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1/2 tsp Caraway Leaves

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

50g of Baked Potato with Skin - included in weights

 

 

 

isand66's picture
isand66

There are many things in my life that I have a passion for, with bread  being near the top.  Recently I was very saddened to learn of the sudden passing of a terrific baker and person Eric Hanner.  Eric was a frequent contributor on The Fresh Loaf website and he inspired me with his passion for baking and touched a great many people along the way.

His willingness to share his vast baking experiences and cooking expertise as well photography pointers left an unforgettable mark on all that came in contact with him.  One of Eric's favorite recipes was his Jewish Rye which goes great with his homemade pastrami.  I had a spirited conversation with Eric regarding our pastrami passion and  I couldn't wait to try his pastrami after I had baked his famous rye.

In tribute to Eric I offer my own inspired Jewish Rye (I'm Jewish...therefore it's a Jewish Rye :0).  I have not used my yeast water starter in a while so I refreshed it with some oranges due to my apples having gone bad.  I also created a rye sour converting my AP starter in 3 stages including adding sautéed onions in stage 2.  Both starters were finished by bringing them from 100% hydration to 65% hydration.

I also picked up some interesting ale at the local supermarket which was brewed with lemon peels, ginger and honey so naturally I needed to use some in this rye bread.

The final loaf ended up being by far one of the best rye breads I have  made to date.  The onions combined with the 2 starters and the ale made this a wonderfully tasty moist bread perfect for a pastrami or corned beef sandwich or a smear of cream cheese.

Procedure

Yeast Water Starter Build 1

60 grams Pumpernickel  Flour (KAF)

60 grams Yeast Water Starter

Mix the flour and Yeast Water in a bowl until thoroughly combined.  Cover the bowl and let it sit at room temperature for around 6 hours.  The starter should almost double when ready to proceed to build 2.

Build 2

Add ingredients below to starter from above and mix until incorporated.  Cover with plastic wrap and let sit at room temperature for 6 hours.

100 grams Pumpernickel Flour

100 grams Yeast Water

Build 3

Add flour to starter from above and mix until incorporated.  Cover with plastic wrap and let sit at room temperature for 4 hours or until bubbly and either use immediately or put in the refrigerator for the next day.

100 grams Pumpernickel Flour

10 grams Yeast Water

(Note: I made extra starter since I wanted to use this for another bake.  You can cut the amounts down to make the 125 grams needed in the recipe)

Rye Sour Starter Build 1

63 grams AP Starter

63 Pumpernickel Starter

75 grams Water

Mix the flour, starter and water in a bowl until thoroughly combined.  Cover the bowl and let it sit at room temperature for around 4-6 hours.  The starter should almost double when ready to proceed to build 2.

Rye Sour Starter Build 2

100 Pumpernickel Flour

100 grams Water

123 grams Sautéed Onions (sautéed in olive oil)

Mix the flour and water with the sour starter from build 1 along with the onions.  Cover and let sit at room temperature for 4-6 hours until doubled and nice and bubbly.

Rye Sour Starter Build 3

102 grams Pumpernickel Flour

Add the flour to the rye sour from build 2 and let it rest covered for 4-6 hours until bubbly and nearly doubled.

Main Dough Ingredients

300 grams Rye Starter from Above

125 grams Yeast Water Rye Starter from Above

400 grams First Clear Flour (KAF)

80 grams White Rye Flour (KAF)

50 grams Rye Chops (KAF)

30 grams Potato Flour (KAF)

357 grams Tenacious Traveler Shandy Ale

18 grams Seas Salt or Table Salt

8 grams Caraway Seeds

1 Large Egg (for egg wash only)

Procedure

Build your Yeast Water levain and rye sour starter the day before you are ready to bake.

The evening before you want to bake, mix the flours, rye chops, caraway seeds and the ale.  Mix on low-speed in your stand mixer or by hand for about 1 minute until the ingredients are combined.  Let the dough autolyse for about 20 minutes to an hour.

Next add both levains along with the salt and mix for 4 minutes on low.  The dough will come together and be slightly sticky.  Place the dough in a slightly oiled bowl and do a couple of stretch and folds.  Cover the bowl and let it rest for 10-15 minutes.  Do another stretch and fold in the bowl and let it rest another 10-15 minutes.  Do another stretch and fold and let the dough sit out in the covered bowl for another 1.5 hours.  Place the dough in the refrigerator until ready to bake the next day.

When ready to bake take the dough out and leave it covered in your bowl for 1.5 to 2 hours.  Next divide the dough into 2 loaves and either place in a banneton or from into batards and let them rest in floured couches for 1.5 - 2 hours.

About one hour before ready to bake, set your oven for 500 degrees F.and make sure you prepare it for steam.  I have a baking stone on the top shelf and the bottom and use a heavy-duty rimmed baking pan that I pour 1 cup of boiling water into right as I put the loaves into the oven.

Score the loaves as desired and brush each loaf with a simple egg wash using 1 whole egg and a couple of teaspoons of water.

When ready to bake place the loaves into your oven on  your oven stone with steam and lower the temperature immediately to 450 degrees.  It should take around 30 minutes to bake  until the rye breads  are golden brown and reached an internal temperature of 200 - 205 degrees F.

Let the loaves cool down for at least an 2 hours or so before eating as desired.

 

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