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Juergen Krauss's picture
Juergen Krauss

Some time ago I had the idea to bake several loaves under exactly the same condition, with one parameter changed, be it flour type, hydration, timing ...


Due to my recent sourdough experiences I found it interesting to bake a series of loaves with different final proof times, to see, taste and document the effects of underproofing and overproofing.


The recipe used is Richard Bertinet's white dough, slightly modified: 100% bread flour, 70% water, 2% salt, 2% fresh yeast (I used 0.7% instant yeast)


I used the slap&fold technique to mix and develop gluten. Bulk proof 1 hour with folding after 15 and 30 min, then shaping into 200g batards and proofing seam-side up in a couche. Baking at 240C for 12 minutes, without steam.


Ambient temperature and dough temperature were 24C to 26C throughout.


I made 2 batches of dough of 1kg each.


The proofing times were in minutes: 20, 40, 60, 80, 100, 120, 140, 160


From the second batch I repeated the 60min and 100min proofs to assert the same behavior.


Here a picture of the baked loaves, I marked the 2nd batch with [2]


loaves 1


loaves 2


 


The results:


Oven spring:


The loaf proofed for 20 minutes has a major blowout. The 40min and 60min loaves opened nicely, with a good oven spring. Above 60min proof there is not much oven spring.


Crust:


It is obvious that the longer the proof the more sugars are present


Poke test:


This is difficult to document in a photo, but to my feeling the dough was perfect at about 60 to 70 minutes proof.


Crumb:


Crumbshots are added below. The 20 min loaf has big irregular holes and very dense areas in the crumb. The holes look like torn. Very rubbery and unpleasant to eat. Above 120 min proofing the crumb feels a bit fragile. Otherwise the crumb  looks and feels surprisingly similar.


Smell and taste:


Above 100 min proof slightly yeasty. The 20 min proof didn't taste of much. My personal choice for taste would be 80min proof.


Handling:


Above 100min the dough feels very fragile, at 140 min it collapsed when slashing.


collapsed


 


Conclusion:


The loaf at 20min and the loaves above 80min proof showed clear signs of over-and underproofing.


This particular formula seems to be quite forgiving when looking at crumb and taste development.


In my kitchen with those conditions I would probably aim at 70min proof, a matter of personal preference (My wife chose the 60min loaf as her favourite without knowing any of the background)


 


And here the crumb shots - please excuse the differences in lighting.


20min


40min


60min


80min


100min


120min


140min


160min


 


 

Smita's picture

Yeast in India

December 20, 2010 - 5:58am -- Smita
Forums: 

Dear all,


I'm headed to India (Bombay / Mumbai) to spend time with friends and family over break, and they've asked me to bake with them! I am excited and nervous! I am a beginner baker and deligently use KAF and my scale for every little baking adventure. I'm thinking about making dinner rolls since they don't need a special pan or hard-to-find ingredients. Recipe from the Fresh Loaf here (http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/21117/dinner-rolls)

AnnaInMD's picture

Holiday baking

December 10, 2010 - 4:13am -- AnnaInMD

I have been brought up on Stollen during the Christmas Holidays and to be honest, the best part was the crust of melted butter and powdered sugar.


The dough itself always tasted a bit dry - ok, the last time I ate Stollen was while East Germany was still behind the wall and Grandma might not have had all the good ingredients. 

freshbaker86's picture

feeding dough?

November 29, 2010 - 8:46am -- freshbaker86
Forums: 

Hi


 


Im new to the forum and bread making, but I worked for a guy at the weekend making pizzas and he gave me the left over dough. He said feed it tonight and every few days with flour and sugar or honey and it'll survive as long as you want it, just break off bits when you want it.

overnight baker's picture
overnight baker

When I was working part time looking for a job I found bread baking to be a fulfilling enjoyable part of my day to look forward to. Since starting work full time as a teacher however my bread baking has dropped to zero as lesson planning has taken up more and more time. Then a couple of weeks ago I found out I would be teaching microbes to year 8's (~12 years of age), so I couldn't resist the chance to combine something I love with what should hopefully be a good way to teach some of the topic.


For just over a weeks time I have booked out a food technology lab for 1:40 minutes and I'm looking for a good bread recipe to go from separate ingredients to finished loaf/rolls in this time (ideally one and a half hours but I know I'm pushing it). Has anyone ever done this before or can anyone point me in the right direction for an appropriate recipe?


N.B. My students will have access to fairly good ovens, parchment covered trays and mixing bowls. I'm looking for a fairly simple wheatflour and dried yeast style recipe but one that can be individualised so the small groups they are working in can choose to either make individual rolls or club together to make a big loaf. However any suggestions that people have will be greatfully received.

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