The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

wine

  • Pin It
4akitchenblog's picture
4akitchenblog

I LOVE wine.

I drink wine every single day.

And, I am addicted to baking bread....

Why not!?

My favorite combination : Wine + Bread = Yum :-)

I added chopped cranberries, too.

Sourdough Wine Baguette & Batard 

Thanks to wine and cranberry, it has a nice sweet and tangy flavor and definitely goes well with blue cheese!

I can't stop drinking & eating wine!

———————————————————————

Sourdough - Wine Baguette + Batard

Makes 1 baguettes and 2 small batards

—————————————-

Ingredients

102 g 100% hydration starter

287.8 g Gold Medal All-purpose Flour

80 g Water

123 g Red Wine

6.7 g Salt

80 g Dried Cranberries

—————————————-

Formula

338.8 g Gold Medal All-purpose Flour (100%)

 131 g Water (38.6%)

123 g Red Wine (36.3%)

6.7 g Salt (1.98%)

80 g Dried Cranberries  (23.6%)

—————————————-

Directions

  1. In a bowl, mix flour and Wine + Water roughly, cover it with plastic and Autolyse for 12 hours in the fridge.
  2. Add Sourdough starter and mix by folding dough in the bowl.
  3. Add chopped Cranberries and mix by folding dough in the bowl.
  4. Add Salt and Slap & Fold for 3 - 4 minutes or until the dough becomes a ball.
  5. Bulk fermentation at room temperature, 1 sets Stretch & Fold (1 set = right over left, left over right, bottom over the top, top over bottom) every half hour until enough strength has been developed.
  6. Let it rise until the dough starts showing the 'activity' and becomes about a third in size. It takes about 6 hours total in winter time (it depends on the season) in my kitchen.
  7. Put it in the fridge for 16 – 18 hours.
  8. Pull it out of the fridge and leave it out for 1 hour.
  9. Divide into 2 equal parts and preshape the dough.
  10. Let it rest for 15 - 30 minutes.
  11. Shape into baguettes / batards and place onto a floured couche, seam-side up.
  12. Preheat the oven to 500°F
  13. Final fermentation for 45 minutes - 1 hour.
  14. Score the top of the baguettes / batards using a lame or a sharp, serrated knife.
  15. Place the bread in the preheated oven, pour the water onto the brick blocks and shut the oven door immediately. Turn down the oven to 480°F, bake the bread around 20 minutes.
  16. Let them cool onto a rack.
  17. Ready to eat!

The time and temperature will be changed depends on the season.

 

 

steelchef's picture

Has anyone used or considered wine/beer yeast as a sourdough starter?

April 21, 2011 - 11:44pm -- steelchef

Curious!


I used to make wine in the basement and had great success with natural sourdough starter. It has been six years since moving the wine making to a U-Brew. Now I can't get a natural starter happening.


So, has anyone used a wine or beer yeast to start a poolish?  Any info would be appreciated. I intend to give it a try regardless.


 

leighbakes's picture
leighbakes

Read the original blog post here!


On Valentine's Day, I rediscovered a heart-shaped cake pan in the back of my pantry and knew I had to put it to use. Since it was my first cake attempt, I wanted to use another fairly simple recipe, so I found this recipe for dark chocolate cake on allrecipes.com: Dark Chocolate Cake. It got some pretty excellent reviews from the site's readers, including one person who wrote, "I am a pastry chef, and this is the only chocolate cake that I will make from now on." Awfully high praise! When I pictured the finished cake, I couldn't get the image of a glossy chocolate ganache-covered heart cake out of my mind...so I dug up a recipe for red wine chocolate ganache I'd seen on cupcakeproject.com. What could be more sexy and romantic than dark chocolate cake with red wine ganache for Valentine's Day? Okay, here's something you should know about me (if you haven't already noticed): I'm a chocoholic. This means that I often don't consider a dessert worth eating unless it contains a fair amount of chocolate. This also means that I'll need you guys to urge me to try recipes that aren't all about chocolate. I'd gladly welcome any non-chocolate recipe suggestions any time! I didn't really run into any problems mixing the batter, although it did take a long time to prepare the chocolate mixture, sift all the dry ingredients, and beat everything together. I tend to be a slow worker, but I also lack some of the tools that would make all this a lot easier, like a freestanding mixer. The cake came out looking good, though I found those big cracks down the middle distracting. Is that normal for a cake? Maybe I filled the pan too high. Because I wanted to cover this cake with poured ganache instead of frosting, I knew I had to flip it over to hide those cracks. I did, and it looked pretty great. Because I had a lot of extra batter (the recipe fills three cake pans, which I don't have), I made some extra cupcakes. These looked nicer than my last ones, but just like last time, one oozed in the oven. Seriously, why does that happen? Of course, the oozy cupcake became my taste test. I liked this cake a lot, and I can see why it got good reviews: it had a delicate texture and a nice chocolate flavor. It wasn't as moist as my last batch of cupcakes, though, so I think I'll stick with that other recipe the next time I make chocolate cupcakes. But if you're looking for a classy dark chocolate cake, this is a lovely one. More on those cupcakes later! Back to the cake... The ganache was a breeze to make. I liked the way it tasted, though it's not for the faint of heart--that stuff is rich. The very thin layer I poured over the cake turned out to be plenty; if I'd spread it on, it might have been overwhelming. As for the pouring process, it went well except for two snags. Because the cake was so rounded on the bottom, it cracked a little when I flipped it over, which showed through the ganache. Second, it was difficult to coat the sides of the cake as thickly and neatly as I'd have liked. If I were to do it again, I'd make a little more ganache for that purpose. Here's a photo of the cake covered in ganache, plus an ill-advised decoration attempt. I've learned my lesson: ganache and edible red gel do not look good together. I wanted to make a border of gel hearts, but they barely showed up on the dark background. Should've known better. As you can see, I ended up with more of a broken-heart cake than a heart cake...which seemed a little more cynical than what I was going for. I decided to cover up my bad decoration and the crack down the middle with a design using pecans. It was very experimental, but I'm pleased with the outcome. The result was a tasty cake with just the right amount of tasty ganache. The pecans didn't hurt a bit, either. My mom, who loves all things rich and chocolatey, was in love. This was the first thing I'd baked entirely from scratch that I was truly proud of! I'll save my stories about frosting those cupcakes for my next post. As always, thanks for reading and thanks for commenting! It's great to have supportive readers to keep an eye out for me as I stumble through this self-taught baking course.


Read more...

Erzsebet Gilbert's picture

Winebaking Part II: what happened?

October 11, 2009 - 4:57am -- Erzsebet Gilbert

A while ago I posted a question about the possibility of baking with wine - whether it could be done, what the tricks might be, and general anybody-know...  I received so much helpful tips about procedures, and recommendations of the Vinafera wine flour, and links and ideas.  User yozzause had the excellent idea of adding wine to a recipe I was familiar with, and using a starter, so I finally, finally worked up the guts to try that...  

turosdolci's picture
turosdolci


Taralli are a biscuit that is eaten by Italians any time of the day. It should be named the national biscotti because taralli are enjoyed by young and old. Wheather it is for breakfast, as a snack, dunked in wine, as a treat for children, they are a biscuit that fills every occasion.  They can be found  in every bakery, market and in every Italian home.  There are many preparations of taralli, but the one here is from the village where my grandparants come from, "Vieste (FG) Italy".


Puglian Taralli
Recipe Summary
Prep Time: 50 minutes 
Cook Time: 20-25 minutes @ 375 degrees F 
Yield: 5 Dozen


Dry Ingredients


3 cups all-purpose flour, unbleached


2 cups semolina flour


2 teaspoons dry yeast


1 teaspoon salt


2 tablespoons fennel seeds, lightly crushed, or 1 tablespoon crushed black peppercorns, or 1 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes


WET INGREDIENTS


1 cup dry white wine, warmed


1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil, warmed


DOUGH


Sprinkle the yeast over the warm wine and let it stand for several minutes, then stir it into the wine and mix well.  In a large bowl put all the remaining ingredients and your chosen seasoning. Mix and knead well until the dough is smooth and elastic.  Return to a clean bowl and cover the dough with plastic wrap or a dampened towel and let it rise for 30 minutes or longer in a warm place.


ASSEMBLY


Divide the dough into pieces. Roll them into 1/2” cylinders. Cut them into 6” lengths. Bring the two ends together and join them to make a round doughnut - like shape. Press your thumb on the ends to seal them.


BOILING


Bring a pot of salted water to a boil and drop the taralli in a few at a time. When the taralli rise to the surface, remove them and put them on a clean towel to dry.


BAKE


Arrange the boiled taralli on a cookie sheet and bake in the oven for 20-25 minutes, until they are golden brown.


Note:  When crushing the black pepper, do not use a grinder.  The finely ground powder from the pepper will make the taralli taste hot.  Use only hand crushed pieces.


 An old Italian say: "No matter what the argument, it can be resolved with a glass of wine and a handfull of taralli"


Erzsebet Gilbert's picture

A winemaker wants to be a wine-baker....

October 1, 2009 - 4:53am -- Erzsebet Gilbert


Hello, everybody!


So, here in Hungary, it seems like everybody's got a farm, and coextensively a vineyard.  My husband David and I don't, but we do have an incredibly kind old neighbor who's teaching us to make our own red wine. It's so much fun - picking our own grapes, grinding them, removing stems...  Like so:


Erzsebet Gilbert's picture
Erzsebet Gilbert

Hello, everybody!


So, here in Hungary, it seems like everybody's got a farm, and coextensively a vineyard.  My husband David and I don't, but we do have an incredibly kind old neighbor who's teaching us to make our own red wine. It's so much fun - picking our own grapes, grinding them, removing stems...  Like so:




Naturally, in gratitude I've baked him lots of bread.  We're not quite done, but in approximately two weeks we will have (for $50) 150 litres of red wine!  Which leads me to my question:


I've seen and read a number of beer bread recipes.  But obviously, we've got plentiful wine...  Are there any breads which call for a splash of wine in the dough?  It seems like it would be possible, but I've never seen any; I'm still a student baker, so I don't know if there are any chemical or taste-related reason for this.  Does anybody know, and if wine bread exists, any ideas?  


Thanks!  


Erzsebet


Also, if anybody is interested in other pictures and a diary of our winemaking process, it's on my blog - http://erzsebetgilbert.blogspot.com

Subscribe to RSS - wine