The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

wholegrain

Toad.de.b's picture
Toad.de.b

Springtime is outdoor time.  Meaning less baking time :-(.  So I'm pleased to have worked up this 36h labor-lite levain.  It has very satisfyingly complex flavor, surprisingly light crumb and an irresistible crust when baked boldly.  Prep is facilitated by using the same flours (a modified Rubaud mix) for both levain and dough.  Many thanks to Ian(ArsP) via PiPs for novel (to me) process pointers.

Click the table below to go to a working Google spreadsheet

First Morning    
1.  Mix final levain build in 25˚C (77˚F) water.  Incubate @ 25˚C (77˚F). If possible (not essential), aerate levain and let rise 1-2X before using.                    
2. Mix final dough's flours in RT water.  "Enzymatically preferment" at 20-22˚C (68-72˚F).

First Evening
3.  Mix salt and levain into autolysed flour with pincer & FF until dough comes together.                     
4.  Bulk ferment ~2h @ 25˚C (77˚F) w/2-4 folds early.  Rest, shape & refrigerate.

Second Evening    
5. Proof 1-2h @ 20-25˚C (68-77˚F).                    
6. Bake 20' @ 230˚C (450˚F) w/steam, then 12' @ 215˚C (420˚F) with convection  (watch it), longer for loaves > 750 gr.

The "Rubaud*" flour mix is a slight modification of Gerard Rubaud's formula.  My "*" version is

35% AP
25% Bread Flour
30% Whole Wheat
7% Spelt
3% Rye

The process exploits Ian(ArsP)'s "enzymatic preferment" during Day 1.  In theory, this saltless soaker is intended to release free amino acids by proteolysis from seed storage proteins, enhancing Maillard activity in the oven.  It also performs as much conventional autolyse as any dough could ask for.  Aerating the levain (stirring it down) releases more free amino acids in the levain, and it's interesting to see it grow back up, in the couple of bakes (weekends) where I actually had a chance to do that.

As Ian(ArsP) points out in his blog, it's convenient to start the levain build and enzymatic preferment at the same time.  Easily done before leaving for work in the morning.  Mixing, folding and bulk are performed that evening, with the dough rested, shaped and refrigerated before bed.  The dough moves slowly during the 24h fridge retard, but comes back to life when retrieved to warm up while the oven is doing the same, or a bit longer. 

Earlier bakes (below) with this process were at 78% hydration.  Cutting back to 75% unflattened the profile nicely.

This one's a keeper.  I'm anxious to apply this process to formulae I've previously come to know and love.

Happy Baking and Happy Spring!

Tom

bread10's picture

Barley, buckwheat and spelt sourdough loaf

January 7, 2012 - 2:39am -- bread10
Forums: 

Hello, I generally make a spelt sourdough with sprouted rye grains (crushed but not milled). But for a change, I was thinking of making something along the lines of barley and buckwheat with spelt but not sure where to start with proportions etc.

Would you suggest using barley and buckwheat flour (the problem with that is sourcing fresh flour)? or soaking/sprouting the grains and crushing them?? I don't have a grain/flour mill, but I can use my coldpress juicer to crush them into a paste like I normally do with the rye grain.

Mebake's picture

Has anyone had this happen?

March 27, 2011 - 12:20am -- Mebake
Forums: 

Hi, Fellow TFL'ers

I'am sure many of you have baked recipes from Peter Reinhart's Wholegrain breads. Yesterday, I mixed a soaker and a BIGA for a 100% Whole wheat sandwich bread. When i woke up 8 hours later, i found that the soaker has inflated the plastic wrap to a dome.. i.e. My BIGA was outside, and the soaker was in the fridge. The BIGA was overproofed, and smelled of alcohol... What to do? My baking instincs pushed me to deflate it, shape it to a ball again, and then, freeze it..?!

EdTheEngineer's picture
EdTheEngineer

Firstly, I have a new song to kneed along to. The lyrics are relevant - I can only assume the idea for the video was conceived under the influence of something stronger than fermentation fumes.

The rhythm is slightly faster than my usual kneading rate, but in the same way top athletes often run to music that has a slightly faster beat than they find comfortable to improve stamina, my quest to be a finely honed baking machine will not succeed without a little pain and sacrifice. 

Anyway, I wanted to make a bread for the table to go with a crunchy salad with a fairly weapon's grade french dressing and some cheeses. I made a 'bram' as described in Dan Lepard's The Fresh Loaf. This was done by taking 250g of strong bottle-conditioned ale up to 70 degrees C (I presume to boil off the alcohol) and then 50g of flour was whisked in. When cool, I added a tiny bit of pre-ferment from my sourdough starter (which is not quite ready at five days old but I couldn't resist). I left this mixture for 4 hours by which time it had doubled in volume.

Then:

 - 500g whole grain flour

 - 12g salt

 - 250ml water

 - 150g of the bram

 - A tiny pinch of fresh yeast (maybe half a gram) just because my starter is a little green still.

Mix and knead (to the anthem above) and then 20 hours in the fridge. Shaped into a batard and left to warm and prove for 3 hours, then into the oven. I didn't get a photo of it whole (mouths to feed) but here's a crumb shot:

beery-batard

It's a shame one can't upload flavours to the internet but it's got a really moist, fluffy crumb that has a lovely malty, nutty flavour. Great for soaking up the salad dressing and you can taste it along side fairly powerful cheeses. I'll make it again for sure. Pleasingly light for a 100% whole grain - I tried to be gentle during the numerous stretch and folds and shaping, and the long slow fermentation helped a lot. My sourdough starter will be one week old tomorrow so this week I'll do my first sourdough. I seem to have regressed to eight-year-old boy levels of excitement. I shall also try and find a slightly more high quality camera (with a flash!) as these grainy, blurry iphone shots are letting the side down.

jkandell's picture
jkandell

There's been a lot of discussion here about Hamelman's seeded levains (5 Grain Sourdough and Seeded Levain).  Here is an alternative recipe which I find more to my taste-buds and I encourage fans of seeded bread to give it a try.

Although Della Fattoria uses a stiff 49% levain rather than Hamelman's 125%, I think the flavor differences lies more in the mix of ingredients than the method. The flour is half whole wheat (about four times more than Hamelman), with  the remaining flour  "reduced bran" (98% of the germ and 20% of the bran). In other words, this is mostly a wholemeal bread, rather than a white bread augmented with a touch of whole grain.

The following recipe is adapted from Rose Levi Beranbaum's "Sourdough Wheat Bread with Seeds" from her Bread Bible, which she got from Eve Weber of Della Fattoria.  Although you can purchase reduced bran flour from Guisto's, I followed Beranbaum in "recreating" it by adding 2.8% germ and 1.4% bran to 95.8% all purpose flour.  Be careful your whole wheat flour is fresh--not bitter to the taste, and smells fruity when mixed with water. And freeze your germ and bran so they don't go rancid.  With this much whole grain any bitterness will ruin the loaf.

The levain is 49% hydration; the final dough excluding the levain is 79% hydration, with overall hydration of about 76%.  The final dough is tacky.

 

One Loaf:

 

LEVAIN
           grams  
bread flour       40  
whole wheat       10
water    
24
stiff chef
   
25
Total    
100  
           
FINAL DOUGH
           grams  
whole wheat
   
179

bread flour
      171  
germ (half T)
    5

 

bran (2.5 t)
      3

water       284  
salt       11
honey       14
seeds       73  
stiff levain       100  
TOTAL    
838  
           
           
SEEDS            grams  
sunflower seeds (toasted)       13  
pumpkin seeds (toasted)       13  
sesame seeds (toasted)       14  
flax seeds
      17  
polenta or cornmeal
      17  
TOTAL       73  

 

Prep:

Starting with about 25g of storage chef, create a mature stiff levain of 100g. (About 12 hours.)

Toast the sunflower, pumpkin and sesame seeds, and cool.  Mix with the flax and cornmeal to add later.

Day of baking:

Add all ingredients except salt to bread machine bowl.  Run on dough cycle enough to mix.  Autolease 20 minutes.  Add salt, and run on dough cycle about 7 minutes.  (Because of the bran and seeds, you want to mix a tad less than usual, and do some extra folds to develop the gluten to compensate.)

Bulk Ferment: 3-4 hours @75-80F.  4 stretch and folds half way through, at about 1 1/2 hours.

Loosely Shape. Relax for 20m.  Shape into batard.

Proof 1- 2 1/2 hours.  It is a moist dough and will spread a bit.

Three diagonal slashes.  Bake at 450F for 10 minutes (with steam at 0 and 5 minutes), then reduce heat to 400F for 20 minutes, then finish at 350F for another 10 or 15 minutes until crust is dark orange.  Or bake it Hamelman style hotter and shorter.

HokeyPokey's picture

Peter Reinhart Whole Grain Bread Recipes - too wet and too sweet

July 24, 2010 - 5:39am -- HokeyPokey
Forums: 

I live in the UK, and purchased a copy of Peter Reinhart's Whole Grain recipes book as soon as it came out on sale. I was really looking forward to his book, and trying out complex, wholegrain flavour breads.

However, every recipe i have tried so far has came out too sweet, and my biga and poolish always come out too wet, much wetter than the consistency in his pictures.

Has anyone else had a similar problem with Peter's recipes? Am I doing something wrong?

 

HP

Mebake's picture
Mebake

This is a sourdough batard i baked using a TEFAL small grill oven that i found in my friend's house.

Recipe:

(BIGA):

65g Starter (85% Hydration)

50g "Sifted" white Whole wheat flour (25%)

50g Whole Barley Flour (25%)

50g Whole Spelt flour (25%)

50g All Purpose Flour (25%)

140g Water (70%)

After mixing and kneading for 5 minutes, rest and knead again after 5 minutes for another 5 minutes utill smooth and tacky, not sticky. Round, and store in a refrigerator for 24 hours and upto 3 days.

(SOAKER):

10g Fine sea salt

50g "Sifted" white Whole wheat flour (25%)

50g Whole Barley Flour (25%)

50g Whole Spelt flour (25%)

50g All Purpose Flour (25%)

140g Water (70%)

After mixing and kneading for 5 minutes, rest and knead again after 5 minutes for another 5 minutes utill smooth and tacky, not sticky. Round, and store at room temperature for 24 hours. If more, store in refrigerator for upto 3 days.

(MIXING):

I cut both BIGA and SOAKER into pieces and joined them together in a large bowl. As the BIGA dough is acidified from the levain, it held shape properly. I added 5 gram salt, and gently kneaded for 10 minutes until smooth, rounded into a ball and left to ferment.

(FERMENTATION):

Gentel stretch and fold in the bowl every 1/2 hour for 2 hours, followed by stretch and fold on a floured bench after another 1/2 hour.

(PRE-SHAPING, and SHAPING):

GEntly Spread the dough into a square (do not deflate). Preshape into a batard, leave for 5 minutes, and shape into a batard, and placing the dough seam side up in a Proofing basket for 45 minutes. Pre-heat the oven for 35 minutes with a stone, and River pebbles in an iron sheet as a steaming source.

(BAKING):

After 45 min. Invert the Dough on a peel and transfer the dough into the Oven, and pour hot water on the pebbles to create steam (mind your oven glass), reduce temperature from 500F to 450F.

Remove sheet containg pebbles after 15min. and continue to bake for another 30 minutes until golden brown. Transfer to a cooling rack, and cut after 2 hours.

Taste: I liked the tangy sour flavor of wholegrains. It made an excellent toast, with sliced emmental cheese as a topping. I could have had a fluffier more open crumb by using 10g commercial yeast in the final dough , but opted not to.

Will I Duplicate it another time? I may, but then i would like to include commercial yeast to boost it, as the starter was sluggish and more acidic due to only 1 refreshment from the fridge.

Mebake

blockkevin's picture

Multigrain Sour

February 11, 2009 - 11:38pm -- blockkevin

Hello again

 

This is a bread which I had made once before(with minimal success) a long time ago when I was still a relative sourdough beginner, and I thought I would try it again to see if my new techniques learned here, and the countless hours pouring over my bread book library would produce better results. The formula is courtesy of breadtopia.com a site I visit from time to time to watch their great videos. I followed the formula exactly except as noted in italics below. I also changed the mixing, and fermenting schedule to better fit my personal schedule.

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