The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

whole wheat

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Thegreenbaker's picture
Thegreenbaker

Woo! Hoo!

Referring back to my blog about not being able to make my bread rise..........well, it rose!

I adapted a recipe from BBA. I have been wanting to make Pane Siciliano but time wasnt permitting so I used the Anadama Bread recipe but didnt use the soker. I added 1 cup of fine semolina,

1 cup gluten flour and 2 1/2 cups of wholewheat flour (wholemeal) 2 teaspoons of yeast, salt, 2 TBSPN Barley Malt and about 2 1/2 cups of water.

 

I did this as I didnt have time to do the soker over night then then let the shaped dough rise in the fridge etc.

 

I had just about EVERYTHING crossed watching the dough rise much more strongly than it has before. I folded it let it rise again then cut it into two pieces and made a sandwich loaf out of one and a batard out of the other.

They still looked a bit dubious when I put them into the 500 degree oven (approx....it was 250 celcius-I'm in OZ) Well after a few times misting, I looked in to see my batard and grown about 20%. I squealed with such delight. I made My partner and 4 year old daughter come over to look.

When the baking was done, I put my Batard on the bread board and danced around with it.

My sandwich loaf rose higher than they ever have. And this is difficult as I dont have a proper loaf tin. It is very wide and has quite low sides compared to the loaf tins I have seen on this site. So I was quite chuffed at my success.

 

It was never my technique, it was my ingredients!

The crust is lovely, I had pretty holey crumb *bounces* The bread is a bit, chewy maybe, but I think I could stand to reduce the gluten flour and add a bit of fat to that recipe to soften it :)

 

I am soooo happy! *said with mouthful of vegemite toast*

 

thegreenbacker

Srishti's picture

baguettes: whole wheat

March 9, 2007 - 5:35pm -- Srishti
Forums: 

Has anyone made or does anyone have a whole wheat baguette recipe? We found this awsome bakery today (in a neighbouring town) and decided to check it out! They had these beautibul looking 100% whole Wheat sourdough baguettes. Didn't buy any as I had made so much bread yesterday, but now I'm thinking I should have bought one loaf :(

 

ehanner's picture

Hockey anyone?

March 2, 2007 - 2:03pm -- ehanner
Forums: 

I just baked my first 100% whole wheat bread using the BBA formula. It rose decently to the top of the pan but the instant I moved it it deflated to half it's previous size. I waited for both loaves to recover but they only partially came back so I gently placed them into the oven where they had a race for the bottom. My daughter says they taste OK but as soon as they cool completely I'll be able to use them as tire blocks to keep the car from rolling.

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

This weekend I got to try a couple of flours that I haven't used previously.  

The first was an unbleached AP type (brand name Eagle Mills) that I purchased at a Sam's Club.  With a protein content of 4 grams in a 30 gram sample, it's as high in protein as a lot of bread flours that I have used.  Whether I was brave or foolish is open to debate, but I decided to try in in the BBA pain a la ancienne even though I've never made that bread before.  The flour worked very well in this application.  I'm still of the opinion that the water content in Reinhart's formulas don't begin to produce the types of doughs that he describes in the text, because I had to add more water to get the kind of softness that he indicates.  Once I got the dough sufficiently hydrated, it was very supple and extensible without being excessively sticky.  In fact, I'll cut way down on the amount of bench flour next time (because there will be a next time with bread that tastes this good) so that I don't have as much on the finished bread.  The crust was crisp and the crumb was tender, though not as open as I had hoped.  My shaping left a lot to be desired.  And let's just state up front that it is better to remember to slash the loaves before they go into the oven, rather than a couple minutes after closing the door.  However, ugly or not, this bread has a wonderful flavor.  It was a great accompaniment to the jambalaya that my wife made for lunch Saturday.

The other flour I tried was Wheat Montana's Prairie Gold.  A local grocery has a display set up featuring both the Bronze Chief (a red variety) and the Prairie Gold variety grains.  Each bin of grain feeds into an individual grinder, which I think are impact types.  Just push a button and it drops freshly milled flour into a plastic bag.  It's a bit pricey at 79 cents per pound (which is quite a bit higher than the already-ground and bagged flour of the same brand sitting on the shelf).  Still, I got a couple of pounds of each, partly to play with freshly ground flour and partly to see how the gold variety tastes in comparison to the red varieties with which I'm already familiar.  I used a honey whole wheat recipe that I have used for many years so that I could gauge the behavior of the Prairie Gold against past experience.  The dough mixed easily, but seemed somewhat wetter (because the fresh flour wasn't as dry as the prepackaged stuff, maybe?).  The dough also handled well, becoming very smooth after 8 to 10 minutes of kneading.  It was much tackier than I usually see with this recipe, although it wasn't at all gloopy.  The bulk fermentation easily doubled but although the last rise in the pans was quite a bit slower and seemed to run out of gas before redoubling.  There was very little change in volume while baking.  The crust of the finished loaves is perhaps a little lighter in color than loaves made with red wheat but the crumb is markedly lighter.  It isn't as white as a white loaf, but it isn't dark either; more of a sand color.  Since the flour grind was relatively fine, the crumb is free of any grittiness and fairly close-textured.  The flavor is, well, like whole wheat, but less so.  There is no bitterness or "grassy" flavor that some find objectionable in whole wheat breads.  Some writers have described the flavor as insipid, but I don't think that is accurate.  I think it is more that people are gauging the gold or white varieties' flavor against the flavor profile of the red wheats, which have more tannins.  That's not unlike comparing a white wine to a red wine and complaining that the flavor isn't as robust.  I'm certainly willing to use it in my bread, particularly if I know that the people eating it aren't fond of the flavor of the red wheat.  For myself, I'm happy to continue using the red wheat flours since I like that flavor.

PMcCool

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