The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

whole wheat

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Smita's picture
Smita


Easily the best non-sourdough loaf I have ever made. Followed instructions to the letter.


What surprised me the most was how incredibly light the loaf was. Very good for morning toast. Best within 3-4 days. Thank you Peter Reinhart and BBA!


 

kimes's picture

Can a whole wheat starter be used in French Bread?

March 19, 2010 - 8:27pm -- kimes

I have recently been looking through books on whole grain breads.  I have yet to see any information on a whole wheat french bread and am wondering if it is because of the unique qualities of this type of bread.


I really have two questions:


1) Is there a whole wheat French Bread recipe available, that still maintains the slight sourness, airy texture, and large holes?


2)  Would using a whole wheat sourdough(ish) starter effect the flavoring?  Would any adjustments need to be made?


 


Thanks for your imput!

breadbakingbassplayer's picture
breadbakingbass...

Hey All,


Just wanted to tease you a bit.  I don't have pictures yet, but here is the recipe for something I will call the "Everything Levain".  I pretty much had all this stuff laying around in my kitchen, so I wanted to make a bread using all of it...  Here is the recipe below.  I will post pictures later this weekend.


Edit: So I finally cut into it.  A friend whom I gave a loaf said the crust was too crusty, and the inside was a bit "dense"...  My loaf, while it was very "crusty", I found the crumb to be pretty OK.  As for the taste, it's pretty OK.  There were so many things it it, that I can't really place any of the flavors individually...  I prefermented 50% of the total flour, with most of it being the mixture of bits.  Maybe next time I will preferment less, up the hydration, and bake it for a shorter amount of time...  Overall, I am pleased with this "bold" bake...  Enjoy!


Tim





3/16/10 - Everything Levain


Stiff Levain (60% Hydration)


440g - Bread Flour


70g  - Rye Berries (freshly ground)


70g  - Spelt Berries (freshly ground)


70g  - Hard Wheat Berries (freshly ground)


70g  - Millet (freshly ground)


70g  - Jasmine Brown Rice (freshly ground)


70g  - Cornmeal


70g  - Graham Flour (Bob's Red Mill)


70g  - 10 Grain Cereal (Bob's Red Mill)


600g - Water


100g - Firm Sourdough Starter (60% Hydration)


1700g - Total


 


Final Dough


750g - AP Flour


250g - Bread Flour


760g - Water


36g -  Kosher Salt


¾ Tablespoon - Instant Yeast


1700g - Stiff Levain


Yield - 3500g dough


 


3/16/10


Stiff Levain


7:30pm - Grind all grains


7:50pm - Mix all with wooden spoon until combined, knead with wet hands until rough dough is formed, cover and let rest.


11:30pm - Knead into ball, transfer to oiled container, cover and let rest on counter.


 


3/17/10


1:00am - Transfer to refrigerator overnight.


8:30am - Turn dough, shape into ball, return to refridgerator.


 


3/18/10


12:52pm - Take levain out of fridge, place on counter and let rest.


1:00pm - Mix flour/water from final dough, place in oiled container and let rest/autolyse in refrigerator.


6:04pm - Take dough out of fridge.  Measure out salt and yeast.  Cut up stiff levain into pieces and place onto dough, sprinkle with salt and yeast, knead 5 minutes and rest for 30 minutes, covered.


6:50pm - Knead dough 1 minute, cover let rest for 30 minutes.


7:20pm - Turn dough, cover let rest.


9:00pm - Divide dough into 3 equal pieces, shape, place in linen lined basket, covered with towel.  Proof for 90 minutes.


9:30pm - Arrange 2 baking stones on different  levels, arrange steam pan, turn on to 550F with convection, preheat for 1 hour.


10:30pm - Turn off convection, place 1 cup of water in steam pan, close door.  Turn boules out onto floured peel, slash as desired and load directly onto stone.  After last loaf is in, add 1 more cup of water to steam pan, close door.  Lower temp to 460F and bake 1 hr with no convection, rotating and shifting loaves between stones halfway through bake, lower to 430F for remaining half of bake.  Loaves are done when crust is deep brown, and internal temp is 210F.  Cool completely before cutting.


 

davidg618's picture
davidg618

I've been reading a lot lately about Spelt flour. My interest was sparked by a seemingly Spelt flour interest-spike among TFLer's, and that I've never baked with Spelt. I've also been wanting to create a 40% Whole Wheat sandwich sourdough bread. We routinely bake a pan-shaped 40% whole wheat straight dough, we're very happy with; however, I wanted a similar, but free-form baked sourdough primarily for grilled sandwiches. I thought it would be fun to do a side-by-side comparison, substituting Spelt flour for the Bread Flour, leaving everything else unchanged, and keeping my dough techniques as nearly identical as possible.


Here's my formula:


Levain:


11 g seed starter (refrigerated, feed every two weeks or more frequently) fed 1:1:1 three time over twenty-four hours yielding 300 g ripe levain. Whole wheat flour used for all builds (represents 16% of total dough flour); levain hydration 100%.


Final doughs:


140 g ripe levain (from above)       16% of total flour contributed


105 g Whole Wheat flour               24%


265 g Bread or Spelt flour             60%


305 g Water                                 70% (includes 70g from levain)


 9 g Salt                                        2%


11 g Olive oil (1 Tbs)                      2.5% 


Procedures: (for both doughs)


Hand-mixed all ingredients to bowl side-cleaning ball; 30 minute rest; French-fold until dough passed window-pane test; retarded bulk proof for five hours @ 55°F with one Stretch and Fold at 45 mins. (The retardation was done only to accomadate my schedule.) Removed from chiller, preshaped, and further bulk proofed at 76°F for two hours. Shaped two batards, and final proofed for one and one-half hours. Scored, and loaded into pre-steamed oven, at 500°F. Immediately lowered oven temperature to 450°F. Baked first ten minutes with steam, removed steam source and vented oven, finished baking: spelt flour loaf 15 more minutes, bread flour loaf 17 more minutes. Cooled completely.


Although these doughs are relatively high hydration, because of the high protein flours the doughs formed soft balls. From the beginning these doughs were different to the touch. Both exhibited comparitive extensibility, but the Bread flour's gluten developed noticeably stronger than the Spelt flour's.  The Bread flour dough shaped more tightly than the spelt flour, proofed more firmly, and exhibited more oven spring.


Obviously, the Bread flour loaf is in the foreground.



The crumb. The bread flour loaf's crumb, while closed (as desired) is lighter, and softer than the spelt flour crumb which borders on the edge of 'dense".



My wife and I taste-tested both breads. The bread flour loaf exhibited the familiar whole-wheat flavor we both like, and the crumb was soft, again as we like in a sandwich bread. The spelt flour loaf had an agreeable flavor--I presume "it" is the flavor of spelt flour--but the whole wheat flour flavor seemed entirely masked.  We shared a second slice of each, but our impressions didn't change. We like them both, but the bread flour formula will stay in our repetoire; spelt flour will have to wait for another formula, another day.


David G


Following the advice of a couple of you, today I baked a 40% whole spelt flour version. Its dough was considerably more slack than the 40% whole wheat flour, everything being the same except for the spelt flour. Consequently, I wasn't able to shape it as tightly, and it spread more during final proofing. Nonetheless, it had comparable oven spring--the crumb appears more open than the whole wheat version.


We like the flavor; it's more subtle than the whole-wheat presence in the alternative loaf. I think for now, we'll keep this formula in our book, and look for a local source for white spelt flour.


The loaf:



and the crumb.



Thank you all for sharing your expertise and advice.


David G.


 

Matt H's picture

Great locally-grown and milled grains in Nor. Cal. from Ridgecut Gristmills

February 5, 2010 - 10:22am -- Matt H

I'm writing with a shameless plug for Ridgecut Gristmills. I don't have any connection, other than as a satisfied customer who hopes that this new business succeeds. The owner is very friendly, and I've been very impressed by her stone-milled flours and her willingness to custom-grind whatever grain I ask for.

John Ambrose's picture

Oroweat WW at Home?

January 31, 2010 - 11:59pm -- John Ambrose
Forums: 

I really like the Oroweat Winter Wheat bread. The ingredient list is quite long, including brown rice, oats, barley, flaxseed just to mention a few. Here is the rub. A small dense 24 oz loaf sells for $4.59 at the local groceries.


I would like to make an equivalent bread at home. Can anyone who is familiar with this product recommend a recipe?


Thank you for your consideration,


John Ambrose

jennyloh's picture
jennyloh

A week ago,  I bought my first rye and whole wheat flour, they were imported from Germany.  I could not understand a word on the description,  but I was determined to try my hand on these flour.  Here I am trying my first rye and whole wheat bread.  Honestly,  I have no idea what it is suppose to look like or taste like,  as I'm not a fan of rye bread usually,  I'm a white loaf freak.  Surprisingly,  this recipe is easy, and the taste is really good.  I still need to work on my shaping and proofing timing though.  


It;s a wet dough to work with,  I'm now aching all over from the kneading,  3 different types of kneading just to get dough ready.  Wish I have a machine to help me with.  I'm still waiting for my birthday present...


 



 


The taste is pretty good though,  seems like the poolish had helped with this outcome.  Is it suppose to look like that?  Unfortunately,  Barry's artisan did have any pictures of the dough he made, and I found many rye and whole wheat that are more dense.  Am I getting this right?


 


Jenny


Recipe Here:


Jenny's Blog on Poolish Rye and Whole Wheat Bread


 


 

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