The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

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jcorlando's picture

Whole Wheat &/or Flax Seed Starter????

January 19, 2011 - 1:41pm -- jcorlando

Chefs,


I'm making a Sourdough starter, rather small at 15g flour and 15g water.


What are you thoughts on using King Arthur Whole Wheat
or fresh Flax seed ground to a flour?


It would probably change the tastes, but would it work??


Also, I live in Annapolis, on the water.
It's cold here (mid January), but air smells clean and fresh
(unlike my condo which is warm but smell like a bachelor  LOL..


So I'm leaving the starter outside to pick up whatever
fresh yeast is blowing out there.


 

arlo's picture
arlo

Before I went and watched my boss's dogs and house while he was away on vacation, I managed to bake a few loaves of bread that I did not get a chance to blog about.


The first loaf was a 100% whole wheat mash bread from Reinhart's Whole Grain Breads.


Reinhart 100% Whole Wheat Mash loaf


I was rather curious about this loaf after having made a few rye breads using Hamelman's hot rye soaker technique. What I remembered from those loaves is the mash imparted a slightly sweet taste to the final loaf as if there was a touch of sugar or honey. Bwraith blogged about this bread as well seen here; Whole Wheat Mash Bread. There is no need for me to rewrite the recipe since it is available on Bwraith's blog, which he kindly supplied in his post.


I only made two changes to the loaf. I used a whole wheat starter in place of the biga, as Reinhart provides as an alternative leavening agent. Also I left out the suggested sweetener in the recipe for two reasons; I felt many of Reinhart's recipes from WGB to be far too sweet to begin with, and second because I wanted to see the potential of the mash. To my surprise I found the end loaf to have a full 'whole grain' taste which I desired, a slightly sour taste, but only a slightly sweet taste too. I half-expected the wheat mash to match the rye mashes I have dealt with before, but to my surprise it couldn't compare. Though this loaf was still very tasty. I imagine the sweetness I was looking for has to do with the more ferment-able sugars found in rye.


 


Reinhart 100% Whole Wheat Mash


 


The next loaf of bread I baked was from The Culinary Institute of America's Baking and Pastry book.


 


CIA Whole Wheat Levain Loaf


It was a simple whole wheat sourdough. The end product though after an over night retardation provided a very, very tasty loaf in my opinion that certainly surpassed what I was expecting. The formula and procedure follows;


Whole Wheat levain


Ingredients                         Bakers %              Weight


Bread Flour (Sir galahad)     50%                     5.4 oz


Whole Wheat Flour              50%                     5.4 oz


Water (DDT 76)                  75%                     8.1 fl oz


100% Starter *                   40%                    4.32 oz


Salt (Grey Sea Salt)            2.7%                   .3 oz


 


*Starter used was a 50/50 of Sir Galahad and Fresh Milled 100% Whole wheat flour. As with the whole wheat flour used in the loaf, it too was fresh milled.


 


Method


1.  Combine the flours, water, sourdough and mix on low speed for about 4 minutes. Let the dough rest for 20 minutes. Add the salt and mix 1 minute on low and then 2 minutes on medium. Aim for a improved stage of gluten development. The dough should be slightly soft but elastic.


2.  Bulk ferment the dough until nearly doubled in volume, about 1 hour. Though it took me about 3 hours in a cold apartment. Fold gently and ferment for another hour. Fold again. Ferment for another 20 minutes.


3.  Preshape the dough into a round and let rest for 15 - 20 minutes.


4.  Gently shape the loaf into a batard or round when sufficiently relaxed.


5.  Place in a banneton lightly floured and covered with plastic overnight in the fridge to have a slow final rise.


6.  When the dough has risen, or the next morning, preheat your oven with your dutch oven or cc, or latest crazy steaming method to 470F.


7. When preheated, remove bread from retarder, load into your oven, score and cook covered (or steamed) for twenty minutes. After twenty minutes remove steaming apparatus, bake in a dry oven for 17 minutes, or until loaf registers 200F, sounds hollow when thumped or looks nice and done to you!


8. Cool completely, slice and enjoy.


 


CIA wholewheat crumbs


 


CIA wholewheat crumb


Two different loaves, but both very tasty.

Jo_Jo_'s picture
Jo_Jo_

This is the bread that I make for my husband, who likes a softer crust and whole wheat.  I like it too, but my favor my sourdough baguettes.  I have spent weeks tweeking this recipe and really like the flavor and texture of the Kaiser shaped rolls I made this time.  They were allowed to rise an extra 45 minutes while the loaf in my clay baker baked.  I'm getting better at braiding the buns without ruining the crumb inside.  The ultimate critic will be my husband though, so we shall see.  First here's my newest version of my recipe:



Whole Wheat Honey Potato Bread


Poolish


14 oz (397 grams) whole wheat flour


14 oz (397 grams) water


3 pinches yeast


 


Mix till all is moistened, then cover and let sit for 8 to 24 hours, best if it is actively bubbling when you use it.  Can be refrigerated after about 6 hours for up to 3 days.



Dough


All of poolish


21 oz (596 grams) bread flour


4 tsp yeast


2 tsp salt


1.5 oz (2 Tablespoons) Honey


.6 oz (18 grams) shortening


1 oz dry milk


.7 oz potato flakes


11 oz water


Process:



I set the ingredients out before starting, measuring them with my scale.  I used my kitchenaid to mix for about 2 minutes, then allowed the dough to rest for 30.  I then kneaded the dough for about 6 minutes, shaped it into a ball, and put it into a bowl to rise for a couple hours.  It took closer to four hours from what I remember.  I pulled it from the bowl ad shaped it, then allowed it to rest for 10 minutes.  I cut it into two pieces, and used 1 lb 12 oz in my clay baker and the rest were made into kaiser rolls.  I have been trying to figure out how much dough to use in my clay baker, if 2 lb 4 oz was to much and 1 lb 12 oz was not enough, then maybe next time I should try 2 lbs of dough. I put the clay baker into the oven and turned it on to 425* baked for 30 minutes and then removed the cover and baked at 380* for another 15 minutes.  I think the crust color is just about right.


The loaf of bread was a little disappointing, when I pulled it from the oven.  Thought I had misread my dent in the dough test, but while it might have been a little better with a slightly longer rise time I think the crumb is actually ok.  It is just a short loaf that took the shape of the pan, probably because I like my dough more hydrated.  I will definitely put more dough in, and might try a little bit less water next time and a little more shortening, plus I might try 50% whole wheat and 50% bread flour.  Not real sure why I had cracks in the crust, another reason I thought this was going to be a brick.  The flavor is outstanding in this bread, probably because I left the poolish in the fridge a couple extra days.




 


Happy this turned out so much better than I thought it had, now on to making my Greek Celebration bread from BBA.  This should be fun!


Joanne


 

dorian821's picture

Los Angeles cooperative flour buying

January 6, 2011 - 3:41pm -- dorian821

Hi, Im Andrew


Im new to the forum and to baking, Ive been baking for about 7 months now and I would like to buy whole wheat flour in bulk. I read through some posts from last year recommending Goldberg and Solovy for 50lb KA bags, they are a great price at 18-20$ per bag. but the problem is that they have a 100$ minimum purchase. as an amatuer baker this is just about twice my budget. is anybody interested in making a joint purchase.


thanks


andrew


 


 

mrgbread's picture

Great River Organic Milling?

December 3, 2010 - 7:57am -- mrgbread
Forums: 

Hi there,


Anyone have any good or bad baking experiences to share using flours from Great River Organic Milling in Wisconsin?  No shipping fees thru Amazon & they have an organic 100% Whole Wheat bread flour.  They used to be Little Bear Milling, which was one of the recommended sources for good flour in Laurel's Bread Book.


I have just ordered some, but says it's 2-5 WEEKS for shipping. 

songwritergirl's picture
songwritergirl


This was my first legit attempt at homemade bread, a whole wheat oatmeal bread. The recipe is from Kim Boyce's "Good To The Grain" cookbook, and is made in one day, using active dry yeast, regular whole wheat flour, oatmeal and unbleached bread flour, and a very short 30-minute autolyse before kneading and proofing. It's a great beginner's recipe.


A short list of ingredients I used:


King Arthur Flours


Red Star Active Dry Yeast

moldyclint's picture
moldyclint

Made a couple of loaves today that went over well with the Taiwanese in-laws, and that I am pretty happy with.  My usual whole wheat sourdough base, with ~30% added high gluten white flour, and about 1 1/2 cups of rye kernels (soaked overnight, then brought to a boil and then left to soak another few hours) and about 1 cup of flax seeds (soaked overnight), and ~1+% salt.  Probably about 9 cups flour total, plus the extra seeds, making a couple of large loaves.  My sourdough, which I have been keeping in the fridge 100% of the time since coming to Taiwan, hasn't yet developed much of a sour flavour (which is fine with everyone but me), but is working well to leaven my doughs. 


This time, I started with ~3 cups of starter, adding 3 cups of flour the night before and putting in the fridge.  After letting that warm up in the morning, I added the final 3 cups of flour, along with the rye and flax.  Bulk ferment for another 2 1/2 hours, split, stretch, fold, shape, and proof for about another 2 hours.  As you can see, precise measurements and replicability are not too high yet on my priority list.  Will likely try this one again and actually keep track of masses...


 




songwritergirl's picture
songwritergirl


I'm new to the Fresh Loaf website, and a new student of home bread-baking. I want to chronicle my journey on this blog, and I'm definitely after that ultimate taste and texture in creating bread.  


These whole wheat ciabattas aren't my first attempts at baking bread, but they are my favorite flavors and textures so far. They're made with white whole wheat flour, (hard white wheat), using the recipe formula for Whole Wheat Focaccia from "Peter Reinhart's Whole Grain Breads:New techniques, Extraordinary Flavor."


The flavor and crust are excellent, although I was hoping for a little more open and airy crumb. I think next time I'll try using regular whole wheat, (hard red spring wheat), a better thermometer, and either a shorter or longer delayed fermentation in the fridge, depending on how the dough seems to be developing. Once I learn to create my own natural leaven, I may try that with this recipe too.


Here's short list of ingredients and tools that I use:


King Arthur Flours


baking stone


parchment paper


pizza peel


oven thermometer


I'm really enjoying this learning process, and eating the bread I bake is such an immediate and gratifying creative experience. I love the community that sharing food can create, and one of the things I love doing most is sharing an evening with great friends, food and conversation.


And great bread.


 

lizzycooks's picture
lizzycooks

 


Thank you for the beautiful inspiration to try this bread today!  I developed a wild-yeast sourdough starter recently, and decided to use it to try this recipe, despite my skepticism about the 8 g of starter.


Well - I'm pretty happy with it!  The crumb is open - not as much as txfarmer's - and the crust rates with the best I've made.  Inside, the texture is very moist and chewy.  My skepticism about the amount of starter was proved wrong – the dough rose at the rates suggested.


One thing I did not understand in the directions was the process between proofing and baking. Here’s what I did:


Step 5 – shape, let rise in greased/floured bowls (2.75 hours, warm kitchen).  I don’t have proofing baskets.


Heat oven to 500, ready cloths in hot pan for steaming


*tried* to transfer loaves to flat pans for baking, but it was too sticky and would not let me make a nice tall round for baking!  I am used to rounding and boule-ing my loaves before baking, but that would have been impossible unless I used a lot more flour.


Sliced shallow cuts in each loaf with razor


b/c it was sooo very sticky, it ended up starting its bake by spreading; it was probably only 1.5 inches high when I peeked in at 5 min.


steamed it throughout, cooked for about 45-50 min at 500F.


Ended with loaves at about 3.5” each, with splits on the sides (instead of on the top).


I probably used about 820 grams water, instead of 800.  But still, I have never worked with a dough that was so sticky after the proof.  What have I missed, and did it lead to the low-rise of the bread?


Thank you all,


Lizzy


 

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