The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Whole Wheat bread

teefay's picture
teefay

I have a Zoirushi BBCCX20 Bread Machine that I absolutely love and here is my favorite Whole Wheat Recipe that's been tested a lot and never fails me. The reason the Zojirushi BBCCX20 is better at making whole wheat bread in my opinion is because of it's twin kneading blades. It insures the ingredients especially for whole wheat are kneaded thoroughly and that makes all the difference.

Anyways, here is the recipe.

 

Enjoy!

 

100% Whole Wheat Bread for Bread Machine



-----REGULAR LOAF-----

1 cup Water
2 1/2 cups Wheat bread flour
1 1/4 tablespoons Dry milk
1 teaspoon Salt
1 1/2 tablespoons Butter
1 1/4 tablespoons Honey
1 tablespoon Gluten
2 teaspoons Molasses
1 1/2 teaspoons Fast-Rise yeast *** OR ***
2 teaspoons Active-Dry yeast

-----LARGE LOAF-----

1 1/2 cups + 2 tb Water
3 3/4 cups Wheat bread flour
2 tablespoons Dry milk
1 1/2 teaspoons Salt
2 tablespoons Butter
2 tablespoons Honey
1 1/2 tablespoons Gluten
1 tablespoon Molasses
2 1/8 teaspoons Fast-Rise yeast *** OR ***
3 teaspoons Active-Dry yeast


The trick to making 100% whole wheat bread in your machine is an extra knead,
which gives the yeast and gluten a second chance to create a lighter loaf.

When your first knead cycle is completed, simply reset the machine and start again.
Some manufacturers produce home bakeries with a whole wheat cycle;
if your machine doesn't have one, this start- again method works as an easy
alternative.

SUCCESS HINTS:

The gluten gives the whole wheat flour the structure necessary for a good loaf.
If your market doesn't stock wheat gluten, try your local health food store.
Remember the extra knead. It's especially important in 100% whole wheat bread.
Because of the extra knead, use this recipe only on the regular bake cycle.
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jennyloh's picture
jennyloh

A week ago,  I bought my first rye and whole wheat flour, they were imported from Germany.  I could not understand a word on the description,  but I was determined to try my hand on these flour.  Here I am trying my first rye and whole wheat bread.  Honestly,  I have no idea what it is suppose to look like or taste like,  as I'm not a fan of rye bread usually,  I'm a white loaf freak.  Surprisingly,  this recipe is easy, and the taste is really good.  I still need to work on my shaping and proofing timing though.  

It;s a wet dough to work with,  I'm now aching all over from the kneading,  3 different types of kneading just to get dough ready.  Wish I have a machine to help me with.  I'm still waiting for my birthday present...

 

 

The taste is pretty good though,  seems like the poolish had helped with this outcome.  Is it suppose to look like that?  Unfortunately,  Barry's artisan did have any pictures of the dough he made, and I found many rye and whole wheat that are more dense.  Am I getting this right?

 

Jenny

Recipe Here:

Jenny's Blog on Poolish Rye and Whole Wheat Bread

 

 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

We were in Portland, OR last week. While I was in meetings, my wife bounced between Powell's (the biggest book store in the US of A) and the Pearl Bakery. I got to taste a number of their breads in sandwiches my wife brought back to the hotel, but I didn't taste their "multigrain roll," which my wife had one day and really liked.

Susan often asks me to make rolls for her lunch sandwiches, so with her description of the Pearl's roll in mind I went looking for a multigrain roll to make. I've made several of Hamelman's multigrain breads and liked them all. I think any of the ones I've made would make good rolls, but I wanted to try something new. Reading through "Bread," I found the "Whole-Wheat Bread with a Multigrain Soaker." (Pg. 126) It is a 50% bread flour/50% whole wheat dough with a soaker of cracked wheat, coarse corn meal, millet and oats. I had all the ingredients but for the millet. I substituted flax seeds.

This is one heavy dough. I added quite a bit of water, which Hamelman says is often needed, to get the consistency I thought was "right." I formed the 4+ lbs of dough into 2 bâtards and a half dozen 3 oz rolls.

Whole-Wheat Bread with Multigrain Soaker bâtard crumb

I baked the rolls at 450ºF for 15 minutes. The bâtards baked at 450ºF with steam for 12 minutes, then at 440ºF for another 15 minutes followed by 7 minutes in the turned off oven with the door ajar.

The crust was crunchy. The crumb was tender but chewy. The flavor is assertively honey whole wheat, mellowed somewhat by the soaker ingredients. It's outstanding with a thin spread of sweet butter.

My wife liked it but says it's nothing like the Pearl Bakery's multigrain rolls. Hee hee. An excuse to bake more rolls.

David

Submitted to YeastSpotting

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

100% Whole Wheat boules

100% Whole Wheat boules

100% Whole Wheat boules Crumb

100% Whole Wheat boules Crumb

 

I had made the whole wheat bread from Reinhart's BBA a couple of time. i liked it a lot. It was, for me, the perfect bread for a tuna fish sandwich or a BLT.

 

I bought Reinhart's newer book, "Whole Grain Breads" a few months ago and read, with interest, the introductory chapters right away. Following his "journey" and the evolution of his thinking has been really interesting. But I had not baked anything from the new book until today. I decided to start with his "foundational loaf," the "100% Whole Wheat Sandwich Bread. As you can see, I decided to form 2 boules of around 1 pound each rather than making one sandwich loaf. 

 It's interesting that Reinhart's instruction have you hand knead this bread, even after a 2-3 minute machine kneading. This is a relatively dry dough. I hand kneaded it as instructed, maybe with an extra minute or two, and actually achieved window paning. That was a kick! 

 This bread is not really that different from the BBA version. The new formula uses milk (I used buttermilk.) in the soaker. The BBA whole wheat uses water. The BBA bread has an egg in it which the WGB bread does not. The end result is actually quite similar. I suspect that baking boules rather than pan loaves made as much difference as the different ingredients.

 

The crust felt a little soft, even after an extra 10 minutes left in the oven, but it crunched nicely when I bit into it. The bread has a pronounced whole wheat flavor but with many layers of flavor including sweetness that are lovely.

 

I bet this will make delicious toast for breakfast, even with competition from the banana bread from Crust & Crumb that I also baked today. 

 

David 

 

CountryBoy's picture

Whole Wheat Bread from P.Reinhart's BBA

February 25, 2008 - 7:16am -- CountryBoy

I have tried the following recipe 4 times and am still not able to get the proper amount of time of kneading in order to build up the gluten.  After 5 mins. the dough gets very sticky even though I lightly powder my hands with flour and sometimes give it a rest.

It calls for kneading 10-15 minutes but the dough breaks down rather than comes together with gluten build up.

The recipe is as follows however I have doubled it for my own use>

Whole Wheat Bread..P. Reinhart, BBA, p.270

Soaker

CountryBoy's picture

Hamelman's Whole Wheat Bread

August 19, 2007 - 9:39am -- CountryBoy

I have not posted much in the last month or so since I have been working on different variations of Hamelman's Whole-wheat bread, p 122 in his book Bread.  The recipe is fine and I am sure most people enjoy it just as it is. I have baked it about 6 times. However, for various reasons I have being trying to in some way supplement the recipe so that the crumb is smoother and creamier.  To do this I have done the following:

1-Added 1 teaspoon of gluten for each cup of flour

2-Substituted milk where water was asked for.  KA advised doing so.

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