The Fresh Loaf

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dlt123's picture

Coops and Places to buy Whole Grains in or near Portland Oregon

February 21, 2009 - 8:33pm -- dlt123
Forums: 

Hi all, I did a search for coops in the Portland area through the TFL search engine, but could not find any threads.


I live in Newberg Oregon about 19 miles from Portland and close to Salem.  I am looking for good places to buy Whole Grains in bulk.


Does anyone who lives in or near Portland know of a coop or grain supplier with clean, high quality grains that is reasonable in price?


Thank you,
Dennis

JMonkey's picture
JMonkey



Sourdough chocolate cherry bread has become a Valentine's Day tradition around our house. This time around, I reduced the chocolate a bit to make it a bit more manageable to toast (molten chocolate all over the toaster oven is a real pain in the neck) and used some of Carl's 1847 Oregon Trail Starter that Leemid was nice enough to pass along at the Oregon Fresh Loafers' Meet-up back in September.



Awfully tasty stuff.

For the President's Day weekend, I did a bit of baking, but was most satisfied with the whole grain sourdough hearth bread that I set up Monday night and baked this morning, which went very well with some chicken soup and a salad this evening. This time around, however, I forgot about folding the dough and so, just before I went to sleep, I remembered that I'd not done a thing with the bread, beyond hydrating it. Out of necessity, I jumped out of the sheets and did the "French Fold." It turned out very well indeed, flavor-wise, at least.



OFF TOPIC NON-BREAD PHOTOS AND CONTENT FOLLOW

Not that anyone cares about that, of course, but this is a bread forum, after all. Anyway, on Monday, I had the day off while my poor academic wife had to teach class. My daughter was taken care of at her school, so I had ... gasp ... a day to myself!

From my house ... well, actually, from down the street, you can see Dimple Hill towering over the valley, a bald hill that stands just five feet shy of 1,500 feet tall. It's probably not a mile from my house as the crow files, but if you have to hoof it like most mortals, it's nearly a 4 mile hike. And it's lovely. Until today, we had 5 or 6 straight days of clear skies and brilliant sun, which soaked all the way down to my bones. On Monday, I was itching to hit the trail.

I walked through the Timberhill Open Space, into Chip Ross Park, and then took Dan's Trail to the top. It's a lovely walk through meadows, old orchards and managed forest. It's not old growth by any stretch as it's smack in the middle of the Oregon State McDonald Research Forest, but it does pass by at least one old growth stand.

The scenery is nice.


But the view from the top is a real treat. Here's a view to the east of the snow-capped Cascades and the Three Sisters. Snow pack in the Cascades is about 190% of normal, so the sisters are all decked out in wedding attire.



To the West a view of Marys Peak, which, at 4,097 feet, is the tallest mountain in the Oregon Coast Range.



And right before me, Corvallis' little corner of the southern Willamette Valley.



The rain does get to me a bit when it goes on, uninterrupted, for weeks on end. But it sure is fun discovering what a beautiful part of the country I now live in.

JMonkey's picture

Reinhart -- Alas, right about fresh flour

February 13, 2008 - 3:49pm -- JMonkey
Forums: 

When I first read Peter Reinhart's Whole Grain Breads, I discounted a passage in which he writes about home grinding. I wish I could find the exact quote, but essentially, he says that while fresh flour tastes wonderful, it needs to be used within 7 hours or so of grinding -- otherwise, one needs to wait 2 weeks because enzymatic activity will hamper performance. After two weeks, the process is finished and the flour will perform well.

I didn't believe him ...

JMonkey's picture
JMonkey

I've been baking a lot, I've just had no time with work and home life to post. Here's a quick update of what I've been making over the past few weeks.

The sticky buns have been a big hit, but I only make them when we've got company staying over -- otherwise, I eat far too many. Photos and the recipe are here.

Oatmeal bread has made a come-back. I've tried a bunch of recipes, but pre-ferments never work for me because, since I prefer to use cooked steel-cut oats, the water in the oatmeal and the pre-ferment together make the dough too wet. I've finally settled on the recipe from The Laurel's Kitchen Bread Book which relies on the oatmeal alone for liquid, but I took a cue from Hammelman and added an overnight retarding in the fridge. I love the warm, sweet flavor of the oats -- this might be my favorite sandwich bread.


I've also been making sourdough whole-wheat pizzas (60%). Here's the recipe I use for the dough, though lately I've been scaling back the water to 75% so that I can be sure I won't have any trouble with the dough sticking to the peel.



Here's that Ponsford Ciabatta that was giving me such fits a few weeks ago. It turned out OK, but, surprisingly, the flavor was not as yummy as the Poolish Ciabatta from Hammelman's Bread. It also started to go stale just a few hours after I made it. All I can figure is that I overproofed the thing.



Here's a funny one. Just a simple loaf of whole wheat sandwich bread, made with yogurt, from Reinhart's Whole Grain Breads. I have no idea why the oven spring was so lopsided. Odd.



Last, I've been playing around a lot with rye, since I revived my rye starter from a massive attack of stinky black mold. I've tried breads with 40% rye and 60% whole wheat, but unless they're panned, I've never gotten the kind of volume I like. So I've been going with a 40-30-30 mix of whole rye - whole wheat - strong white flour that I've been very pleased with. I also add caraway. Yum.

breadslinger's picture

White Whole Wheat Bread -- What is it?

January 15, 2008 - 9:34am -- breadslinger
Forums: 

White Whole Wheat -- What is it?

I understand that whole wheat contains the bran, rich in fiber, endosperm, the largest part of a wheat kernel, consisting of protein and water, and the germ, the embryo of the wheat, surrounded by highly nutritious vitamins, minerals and oils. What parts of the wheat kernel consist the white whole wheat flours we see today?  

Rosalie's picture

Favorite Whole Grain Bread Books

September 24, 2007 - 1:07pm -- Rosalie
Forums: 

My ideal bread book is one that doesn't even acknowledge the existence of refined flour.  The Laurel's Kitchen Bread Book fits that description (I think - there may be a place or two where AP or bread flour is mentioned).  All other whole grain books that I have found still seem to think that whole grains can't carry a bread.  Even Peter Reinhart's latest book has "transitional" loaves.  He's forgiven because those are in the minority.

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