The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

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loydb's picture
loydb

This was inspired by Franko's 25% Sour Rye with Toasted Seeds. I followed his recipe with the following alterations:

  • Instead of AP flour, I milled 45% hard red wheat, 45% hard white wheat, and 10% rye, then sifted the results to a final extraction of 85%.
  • That said, I ended up adding an extra 1/2 cup of KA BF during kneading to get the stickiness under control 
  • After the final stretch-and-fold, I let the final dough proof for another two hours, then refrigerated overnight 
  • This morning I took it out of the fridge, let it warm for two hours, shaped, and then let proof for 3.5 hours in a banneton

It's cooling now, I'll taste this evening!

 

loydb's picture
loydb

This is my take on Bon Appétit's Thyme Gougères. I subbed chives for the thyme, and used finely milled hard white wheat for the flour. I also hedged my bets with 1/4 teaspoon of baking powder. These are cheesily delicious, and are begging to be filled with something (duck liver patè maybe?)


loydb's picture
loydb

This is my take on Peter Reinhart's whole-grain struan. Instead of adding yeast, I made the firm starter using sourdo.com's San Francisco strain that I've been feeding nothing but home-milled wheat.

For the flour, I milled a mixture of 45% hard red wheat, 45% hard white wheat and 10% rye.



For the soaker I used 2.5 oz roasted (unsalted) sunflower seeds, plus .5 oz each of black seasame seeds, two different kinds of flax seed and two different mustard seeds. These are combined with flour and a little water, then left out overnight.




The firm starter was left out overnight to rise.


The next day, the firm starter and the soaker were worked together on a cutting board, then chopped up into a dozen pieces and mixed with the wet ingredients in my DLX. You can see it come together as I mix the preferments with oil, honey, and agave nectar. I also added in 2T of espresso-ground coffee beans that I'd finished roasting earlier in the day (Costa Rica La Legua Bourbon taken just into the beginning of second crack, for you sweetmarias.com fans), plus a teaspoon of caramel color from KA.




After the dough came together, it got a 15-minute autolyse.


Here's the final dough after another 10 minutes of hand kneading.


For the first 2 hours, I did a stretch-and-fold every half hour. Afterwards, it was left to rise for another 3 hours.


The risen dough was broken into four pieces and shaped for mini-loaves. They proofed for another 2.5 hours.



The loaves were cooked at 350 degrees for 45 minutes.  



The result is a dense, but not at all heavy, bread that is fantastic sliced thin and served with cheese and fruit.

moma's picture
moma

This is my first attempt on making a SD bread with rye.

can someone help me with the bakers percentage?

It contains: (2 loaves or 3 medium ones)

500 g wather

400 g rye

500 g AP flour

500 g SD (on rye - used my regular as I do not care)

40 g salt

(and some sirup/oil)

The dough was wery wet - is there any trick on handeling this kind of dough? I use my scraper tool, but think its har to shape the dough.

I kept it in the fridge overnight - allthought the recipe said otherwise - and it turned out great anyways. I made a SandF before going to bed in order to degas the dough. In the morning the lid was popped and i did a SandF again.

 

johannesenbergur's picture
johannesenbergur

This recipe is inspired by quite a few recipes I've read the past few months. In my opinion this makes an excellent rye loaf.

Ingredients:

  • 300 g Cold water
  • 100 g 5-grain
  • 100 g Stale rye bread
  • 100 g Sourdough (click for my recipe)
  • 5 g Fresh active yeast
  • 10 g Sea salt
  • 200 g Whole rye flour
  • 200 g Graham flour
Pour the water into a bowl and dissolve the yeast. Put the grain mixture and the stale bread, which you have shreadded into tiny bits, into the water. Let it soak for 15 minutes or so.Add the sourdough and salt, mix. Start adding the flour, little by little to make it easier to get a smooth dough.Start kneading. The dough should be rather sticky and difficult to knead, unlike white breads. But you need to knead it for a while to heat up the dough and activate the yeast.Leave it to rise until doubled. I left it for 90 minutes and then I put it into the fridge over night. The next morning I took it out, shaped it into a loaf in a baking tin. Let it again rise to about double size. Just make sure it doesn't overrise and collapse on itself.Get your oven to max heat and place the loaf on the bottom shelf. Turn the heat down to 170 degrees celcius and bake for around 90 minutes, until it makes a hollow sound when you knock on the bottom.If you enjoyed the bread, repeat the process when it gets stale.
jschoell's picture
jschoell

I'm a homebrewer. One of the best smells in the world is a boiling pot of wort, and I've always wanted to somehow "eat" that smell. Well, this is what happened on my fist attempt at a "brewer's bread".


 


Day 1: 3/4 c KA bread Flour


  3/4 c Whole Wheat flour


          1/16 tsp instant yeast


  enough water to make a very sticky dough


mix well and let sit at RT for 18-24 hrs then refrigerate for a day.


 


Day 2: Go to your local homebrew store and pick up a pound of your favorite malted barley (or wheat). I used 3/4 lb caravienne and 1/4 lb belgian aromatic. Mash at 150F for an hour with one quart of water. I used a crockpot and a thermometer. Strain the wort into a bowl and sparge with a cup or two of boiling water. Process the spent grain in a food processor until it obtains a paste-like consistency. Refrigerate the wort and the grain paste overnight. 


Day 3: Cut up the biga into 10 pieces. Combine:


Biga


1 1/2 c bread flour


3/4 - 1 c spent grain paste (depending on how much "whole grain" you want to taste


2 tsp instant yeast


2 tsp coarse kosher salt


1 tsp canola oil (or whatever you like... try melted lard!)


1/2 c wort ( adjust as necessary... my final dough was very sticky)


Stir with a fork until you get a ball, then knead with dough hook on medium speed for 4-5 minutes. Rest dough 20 min, stretch and fold in bowl, repeat three times. form into loaves or boules, proof 2 hours. Set oven to 500f, pour 1 1/2 c hot water into steam pan and place loaves in oven. Reduce to 425f and bake for 15 min, rotate then bake for 10 min or until dark brown and center reads 200f.


 


I was expecting to get a dark, heavy brick, but I was pleasantly surprised by how light and crispy it turned out. Next time I'll add some hops!


 




 

coreyjan's picture

Bread doesn't rise as well in the winter. Is it the lack of humidity?

January 11, 2011 - 12:13pm -- coreyjan
Forums: 

I've noticed that during the winter weather, my whole grain bread doesn't rise as well as it does in the warmer months. Could it have something to do with the relative humidity (or lack thereof) in my house and kitchen? It gets VERY dry in the winter here. 


If so, what's the solution? Should I put a pan of water in the oven? Change my baking temperature? Change the ratio of any of my ingredients? Something else?


I welcome any and all input. Thanks!


 


Corey-Jan

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