The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

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Joe Fisher's picture
Joe Fisher

I've been looking to branch out with the grains I use in my breads. Flipping through Bread Alone, I found a recipe for wheat bread with whole wheat berries. A friend just happened to have a jar of wheat berries on hand, so I was in business!

First things first: soak the wheat berries overnight.

 

Next we prepare the dough. The recipes in Bread Alone are fairly big--this guy weighed in at 4# 4oz! It's right about the limit for my 5.5qt Kitchenaid. You can see the dough trying to escape below. I kneaded for 6 minutes, then finished by hand for some undertermined time. The wheat berries kept trying to escape from the dough, so I had to chase them around the counter as I kneaded. I'm sure it was terribly comical.

 

After a 2-hour rise, I split the dough in half, formed them into boules, and popped them into my prepared bannetons.

 

While they were rising, I prepared for hearth baking, with my Fibrament stone on the bottom and a sheet pan for water on top.

 

After almost 2 hours, it was time to bake. Out of the banneton and onto my Superpeel, then slashed and into the oven. The oven had been heating at 550F for about 45 minutes.

 

After putting water in the steam pan, I reduced the temp to the 450F the recipe calls for. 15 minutes later I rotated the loaves and reduced the temp to 400F. 15 more minutes, and bread's done!

 

This recipe is a definite keeper. The inside is soft and chewy, the high whole wheat content lends tons of flavor, and the whole wheat berries add a welcome little crunch and their own flavor to the party.

 

Stephanie Brim's picture
Stephanie Brim

This is what I've been doing for the last few days. I thought, since this was an interestinng case, that I should post a few things.

The first time I tried to make a starter I did it in the way I almost always do it: stone ground rye and water. For the first time in my starter-making, I got nothing. A few bubbles, but nothing ever concrete after the first few days. It was my first real failure since using the method mentiond in Sourdough 101. I decided that I should change out one of the variables to see what it was.

I remembered that I had a small bag of graham flour I was going to use to make smores cookies...and then I fell sick and ended up getting my gallbladder evicted. Cue finding it again, and then using it to make the second starter. And...resounding success. It's so much a success, even, that I could use it now. It's only been about five days, though, so I don't really plan to, but you know how you feel when something goes extremely *right* from the get-go.

In the mean time, I should mention that I've started feeding it with King Arthur plain bread flour and it's peaking in 4 hours most of the time, no more than 6.  It's taking basically *all the willpower I have* not to just bake with it right now. It smells sour, and yeasty, but not overly acidic. I just don't want to use it before it's really mature enough.

So...hi? And look forward to pictures from me as I bake. Again. Husband will be so thrilled at having ten different kinds of flour in the house again. :D

Also: I have been a member for four years and a week now. Time *flies*.

Jmallan's picture

Quantity of whole grain dough in Electrolux MagicMill/Assistent mixer

July 24, 2012 - 6:54pm -- Jmallan

Hello, I have been lurking in this forum for ages - so much great information!

I possibly should have posted this in the equipment forum, but thought I would start here. I am seriously considering getting an Electrolux Assistent mixer because I want to do larger quantities of dough than my  KitchenAid can handle. I am curious if anyone has used the Electrolux for bread using home milled flour and if you have a feel for the quantities it could process. I'm hoping to do up to 2 kg of dough at 80-100% hydration.  

 

Thanks for your help!

Stephanie Brim's picture

Observations on whole grain breads

January 28, 2010 - 3:37pm -- Stephanie Brim
Forums: 

I just wanted to add a couple of observations about the 100% whole wheat sandwich breads I've been making lately.


First off, the epoxy method really does work. I've done it now by hand and by mixer and it really isn't that hard. I really like it. It seems to give the whole bread a better texture, and I'm getting whole grain breads that are soft enough for even my toddler to like it for PB&J sandwiches. And that's something.

Stephanie Brim's picture
Stephanie Brim

I actually put this together, meaning to for a while, after dmsnyder mentioned Suas's whole wheat. This is my first try at a truly 100% whole wheat bread and both Adam, my husband, and I think it's a keeper, but with one change: it needs more honey.


Soaker



  • 200g whole wheat flour

  • 115g white whole wheat flour

  • 35g gluten flour

  • 260g milk


Biga



  • 200g whole wheat flour

  • 150g water

  • 5g instant yeast


Final Dough



  • all of the soaker

  • all of the biga

  • 50g butter

  • 55g honey (we think that 80g would have been better)

  • 12g salt

  • 25g milk


Method:


Put soaker ingredients together in a bowl and thoroughly combine. Set aside. Put biga ingredients together in a bowl and thoroughly combine. Place plastic wrap over both bowls and let alone for an hour or so. Mine went for a little over since I was feeding Alexander at the time.


To mix the final dough, break both the soaker and biga up into small pieces and place into the bowl of a stand mixer. Add all other ingredients and mix on low until everything is incorporated into the dough, then medium-low for 3-4 minutes until the dough no longer sticks to the sides of the bowl. Place in a bowl for bulk ferment.


During bulk ferment I did 2 letter stretch and folds. I don't really think I needed to as the dough seemed to be very elastic, but I wanted to be sure. Allow to double after the second stretch and fold if you decide to do it. Overall, the dough got a 2 hour ferment.


Cut into two pieces and shape into loaves. This worked for 1 loaf sandwich bread and about 4 rolls. Baked at 350 degrees for about 30 minutes, then went down to 325 for 10 minutes. I took the rolls out before turning the temperature down.


This is soft, light, and perfect for sandwiches. Both my husband and I like the fact that it isn't too heavy, yet it's 100% whole wheat. Considering the fact that none of my projects have been going completely right lately, this success (and one other that I'll mention on my other blog once I've figured it out *without* it being a slight accident) makes me feel good again.


Now I think I can tackle David's San Joaquin Sourdough. ;)

Joe Fisher's picture

First loaf from Reinhart's Whole Grain Breads

January 1, 2009 - 4:32pm -- Joe Fisher
Forums: 

Received this book as a Christmas gift from a relative who really enjoys my bread :)  Yesterday I started the first recipe in the book: 100% whole wheat sandwich bread.  My last three attempts at the 100% whole wheat bread in The Bread Baker's Apprentice were failures, so I was hopeful he had tweaked the recipe and technique.


 


Baked it today and had it with dinner.  My wife claims it's the best sandwich bread I've ever made!


 

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