The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

temperature

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Boboshempy's picture

Best Overnight Proofing Temperature

February 14, 2011 - 7:36am -- Boboshempy

I am able to control the temperature of my sourdough loaves for overnight retarding and proofing and I wanted to get everyone's opinion of what you think the best temperature is and why. There has been a bunch of recent thoughts and discussion on this circulating in books and whatnot and I wanted to put this question out there to the masters.


Thanks!


Nick


 

gary.turner's picture
gary.turner

Since the liquids in nearly every dough need to be tempered, I went looking for some straight forward, repeatable method to get the temperature I wanted. My answer was to use the microwave. The next step was to figure out how to get the right time for any mass of water or milk, and for any temperature change.


We can see that the time required (Sec) is proportional to the mass of the water (M) and to the change in temperature (ΔT), multiplied by some constant (C). 


M × ΔT = C × Sec


Rearranging to solve for the time; Sec = M × ΔT / C


With my microwave oven, the constant is 312.5 for weight in grams and temp in Fahrenheit. There's a kink in the formula though. My oven requires about 3 seconds to come up to speed, so I add that to the calculated time. For example, let's say I have 350g of  40F milk from the frig that needs to be 65F for an intensively mixed Vienna style dough. I need to raise the temp by 25F, so 350×25/312.5+3 yields 31sec to raise the temp to 65F.


How do you find your magic number? Measure some water, say in the 300-450g range. Take its temperature, and zap it for some reasonable time, e.g. 30 seconds. Measure the temp. Repeat with the same weight of water, for a different length of time. Plot the two tests on graph paper (or use a spreadsheet or graphing calculator), and extend the line through the points to where it crosses the zero temperature change line. Where it intercepts the zero temp, the time line will have some small value. That's your start-up time. Now multiply the weight of the liquid by the temperature change and divide by the time less the start-up time. For example, 350 × 25 / (31 - 3) = 312.5 Notice that that is from my own earlier example. Do the math on your other test(s). The C values should closely agree.


Once you have your magic number, any weight of water or milk and any (upward) temperature adjustment will provide the zapping time for your microwave.


cheers,


gary

Paul Paul Paul Paul Paul Paul Paul Paul Paul Paul Paul Paul's picture

Two questions about dealing with dough

October 11, 2010 - 4:48pm -- Paul Paul Paul ...
Forums: 

I have a double whammy here.


 


Alright so I've been making bread lately (along with everyone else in the forum), and I've been having a few problems, about scoring bread, and refrigerating bread. First, about the scoring, i use our biggest knife, and spray it with pam, but it still get a lackluster score in the bread and ends up deflating it. Any help?

fay's picture

How to adjust upper heat and lower heat in gas oven?

June 1, 2010 - 8:31am -- fay
Forums: 

Hi Everyone


I just finished baking a Light Whole Wheat loaf from "Artizan bread in 5 minutes" and the result was not so good :-(


I have an automatic gas oven (gas oven controlled by electrical censor that will turn off the gas automatically once desired temperature is reached)


I have the oven lined with baking stone and i preheat the oven at 230'C (450'F) for 40 minutes before I put the loaf in.

leucadian's picture

Why do we turn down the oven after introducing the bread?

May 19, 2010 - 2:47pm -- leucadian

It's commonplace to recommend turning down the temperature from 500 to 450 when the proofed loaf is put in the oven. Why do we do that? In a WFO, you don't do that, and I would expect that in a commercial deck oven you wouldn't either. Is it to simulate a stone hearth which might be hotter than the air in the oven? I don't think so.

nicolesue's picture

Baking Stone - How to Transfer?

May 19, 2010 - 12:14am -- nicolesue

Hi,


I've recently purchased a ceramic pizza baking stone. What's the best way to transfer the bread dough (like a boule) to the baking stone while it is pre-heating inside the oven. I don't have a peel.


At the moment, I proof my dough on a thin silicon mat. Prior to baking, I'll remove the baking stone from the oven, and slide the whole thing (silicon mat and dough) onto the baking stone, before putting it back in the oven again for baking. I do not remove my silicon mat until the baking is complete.

abrogard's picture

Doughs Suddenly Won't Rise - Could Flour Be Bad?

December 30, 2009 - 4:09pm -- abrogard

I've been baking successfully for a few months now, french bread with packaged dried yeast, one loaf every weekday.


Thought I was turning into an expert.


Suddenly my doughs won't rise. No matter how long I leave them.


And they don't suddenly explosively rise and fall down again while I'm not watching. They don't rise. At least as best I can judge.


I've proved my yeast and it is excellent, works no problem.


The ambient temperature around here recently has been usually better than 32C - 89F.

John Ambrose's picture

Optimum Proof Temperature

November 15, 2009 - 3:12pm -- John Ambrose

My starter will celebrate his first birthday next month. It seems to be very robust, however two issues have plagued the process since starting. These issues are flavor and proofing, which may be related.


Process overview:


Flour (KA Bread) 100%


Water 65%


Starter 20% (have varied the hydration levels from 50% to 150%)


Salt 2%


Autolyse 20 min, add salt, first rise 2hrs, strech and fold, another 2hr rise, strech and fold, preshape, overnight in refrigerator, warm up then shape with final proof up to 3hrs.

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