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finnutcha's picture

SWISS FLOUR HELP !

July 6, 2011 - 6:57am -- finnutcha
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Hi everyone :)

I studied to bake a bread for one year and last month i went to Switzerland and bought 2 packages of flour there but I don't know how to cook because there is no english infomation on the packages so i type it all and translate it on google.

here is what i got

ingredients
Wheat flour (semibiancabigia), 14% seeds (linseed, sunflower, sesame), segake flour, oatmeal, salt, dried yeast, wheat gluten, sugar, dried sour dough rye wheat germ, emulsifiers (E322), enzymes (amylase).
Total content of salt: 1.8%

 

Juergen Krauss's picture
Juergen Krauss

On our last visit to my parents in Germany I chatted with my sister-in-law who lives in Switzerland - about bread.


She tried to make the Zopf many families enjoy in Switzerland on Sundays, but she couldn't reproduce the flaky texture which is so typical.


After a bit of research I found a recipe on www.schweizerbrot.ch which worked very well for me, and this Zopf has become quite popular with friends and family.


It is essentially like a Challah without sugar and goes well with all sorts of sweet toppings, as well as cheeses.


As flour you can get a special Zopfmehl in Switzerland, which usually is a blend of white spelt (10% to 30%) with plain white flour.


I used 20% spelt.


Here the formula:


Ingredient Weight Percent
white plain flour 800g 80%
white spelt flour 200g 20%
milk 300g 30%
water 300g 30%
egg 60g (1 large) 6%
butter 120g 12%
fresh yeast 30g 3%
salt 20g 2%
yield 1830g 183%

Mix ingredients without butter first, and work until gluten is somewhat developed.

Add butter and work the dough until it is elastic, smooth and makes a nice windowpane test.

Let double in size (this took about 1 hour at 23C), fold and let rest for another 30 minutes.

Divide and shape into a braid (I usually make 2 braids from this amount of dough, the recipe source suggests one big 2-strand braid)

Put ther braid(s) onto baking perchament, apply eggwash, let rest for another 15-30 minutes, egg-wash again.

Bake on lower shelf in pre-heated oven at 200C for about 50 minutes (depending on size, my half-size braids need about 45 min).

Part of the bread got eaten before I could take a photo, here is part of the remains (Iwill post a better picture when available):

Butterzopf 1

The crumb is flaky as it should be when you tear the bread:

Enjoy,

Juergen

 

tssaweber's picture
tssaweber

 


Chouette22 posted a couple of weeks ago pictures of her Zopf (http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/13045/hello-switzerland-celebration-bread-and-zopf). In a reply to my post she mentioned that eggs in this bead would make it dryer or stale faster. This motivated me to experiment with my recipe, with the goal to have at the end a fully understood, easy to use and "Americanized" recipe.


To have a solid and accepted expert on my side I used Dan DiMuzio's book, "Bread Baking" to support my testing. On page 138 he defines rich dough and the effect of fat, eggs and sugar in dough. This was a good start as Zopf has all this ingredients in it. Sugar seems to be the least influential with just a little bit more than 2%, but butter (11%) eggs (14%) and to some degree milk(fat) certainly do have an impact. I also wanted to see what the difference between AP and Bread flour would be.


Zopf is the favorite bread of my younger son, so he was very supportive of this idea. He promised his friends in school to bring an entire loaf for lunch and that this bread would beat every other dad's bread. I don't know how many other dads of his friends are baking but I like that it is embedded in him that not only moms are baking and cooking.   


Using my usual recipe I had to adjust the hydration significantly using AP flour otherwise the dough would have been too wet to braid. The final result was ok from an appearance perspective but did taste too much like "normal" white bread and with the additional flour was also much dryer.


Not adding the eggs was a little bit trickier. Eggs are contributing to the hydration but also add fat and strength to the dough. I decided to substitute 75 % of the egg weight with ¾ milk and ¼ water. The dough turned out wetter than usual and I had a difficult time to roll the two strands for braiding. The final bread had less oven spring and turned out a little bit less roundish than usual. The crumb was denser and whither in color. The taste of the bread was even more like white bread.


It seems to me that adding eggs makes Zopf heavier and gives it the crumb structure I like. It also allows for more liquid without impacting the final result.


I will stick with my ingredients but have changed the process to make it easier to assemble the dough. First I add butter, salt (to make sure I don't' forget it again) and brown sugar, zero out the scale, add hot water to soften the butter, then the two eggs and with the cold milk I get to the correct total amount of liquid to balance the varying weight of the eggs. After that I add the flour and the yeast and knead 3 to 4 min on speed one and another couple of minutes, depending on how the dough develops, on speed two of my KitchenAid. 3 stretch and folds with 45 min rest, after the 3rd st&f I divide the dough, braid it and proof for 20 min. Bake for 25 min at 375˚F (convection). The bread should reach 200˚F interior temperature.


Thomas


And here the final result:





For those interested in the recipe you can print or download it here:


http://tssaweber.com/WP/thomas-bread-secrets/zopf/


The spreadsheet lets you adjust the final dough weight.

bakersteve's picture

Anyone got a recipe for Wegglitag?

February 6, 2009 - 7:39am -- bakersteve
Forums: 

Has anyone got a recipe for Wegglitag? These are a Swiss breakfast roll that (if I have identified the species correctly) I can remember my mother and I fighting over in Interlaken in the 60s (there was a bakery just behind the hotel). They were absolutely amazing, and like nothing we had ever tasted before. In a mixed basket of rolls there was usually only one (hence the fight). They were shaped like little lemons.


Steve

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