The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

sweet

  • Pin It
sourdoughboy's picture
sourdoughboy

I saw a recipe for Bath Buns--a traditional sweet, glazed bun from Bath, England--in Richard Bertinet's "Crust." The buns looked rather like the baked char siu bao of dim sum, so I thought I'd tart up the traditional dim sum dish with a higher-end bun. 


The result was eerily reminiscent of the dim sum dish--I'm now thinking that the dim sum dish is likely a descendant of the Bath Bun (by way of the British in Hong Kong). Any food historians out there? According to Google, I'm the first to advance this poorly supported theory. Anyhow, onto the baking...


 


The results:


 



 



 


Bath Bun recipe adapted from Bertinet's "Crust" (I only had soy milk on hand, and no fresh yeast, so I fiddled a bit)


 


Preferment:


125g bread flour


125g water


2 g active dry yeast


 


Dough


4g active dry yeast


375g bread flour


113g butter (1 stick0


75g sugar


150g unsweetened soy milk


2 eggs


7g salt


 


Glaze:


150 g soy milk


75 g sugar


 


Night before:


1. Mix preferment together. Let rest for 90 minutes.


2. Mix preferment + dough list. Knead until smooth (it's soft and sticky, I used this technique.) Fold/tuck dough, rest in greased bowl for 1 hour.


3. Make filling (below). 


4. Press out dough, tuck into ball. Place in greased bowl, Cover. Refrigerate


 


Morning of:


1. Divide dough into 12 parts (approx 75 g). 


2. Press out dough on lightly floured surface. Put 1 heaping teaspoon in center. 


3. Place in palm of hand. Pinch together into ball (4 pinches should do the trick: 1. Pinch top to bottom. 2. Pinch left to right. 3. Pinch top left to bottom right. 4. pinch top right to bottom left.)


4. Place seam-side down onto parchment lined baking sheet.


5. Cover, proof till doubled in size (2 hours).


6. Preheat oven to 375.


7. Make glaze: dissolve sugar in soy milk on stove top.


8. Glaze buns. Put in oven for around 20 minutes, till they look scrumptious.


9. Glaze buns again while warm. I'm generous with the glaze--the bun should be sticky.


 


The filling:


1/2 lb boneless pork country-style rib


3 tb hoisin sauce


1 tb ketchup


2 tb water


1 teaspoon onion powder


1 teaspoon five spice powder


 


1. Slice pork into 1/2 inch strips.


2. Marinade in 1/2 of the marinade for an hour.


3. Roast for 15 minutes at 350, glaze with remaining marinade, and finish for 5 minutes under broiler.


4. Cool in fridge overnight.

ilan's picture
ilan

Wife and daughter went to visit family, leaving me pondering which bread to do today.


I went back to basics; I wanted something tasty but simple. No preferment and other techniques that surely improve the final outcome but take a lot of time.


I made something very similar to the http://www.thefreshloaf.com/lessons/addingmore post but added sugar, salt yeast and switched butter with vegetable oil.


The recipe goes like this:


-       3 cups flour


-       1/2 cups of water


-       1 cup milk


-       1/4 cup oil


-       1/4 cup sugar


-       3 teaspoons yeast


-       1 ½ teaspoon salt


-       1/2 egg


Mix flour, water, milk, oil egg, sugar and yeast and let rest for 20 minutes


Add the yeast and knead for 10 minutes.


The dough should be very elastic but not too sticky.


Cover with plastic/wet towel and let the dough rise for ~70 minutes (a lot of sugar, no need to wait too long).


Forming the loaf – We want to make a braided bread here. So, divide the dough to 3 equal parts, form long strands out of each part. The edges should be thinner the center. Connect the 3 strands in the edge and start braiding them together.


Cover and let rest for 45-60 minutes or until it doubles in size.


Preheat the oven to 250c. I have a baking stone on which I place a pot full with boiling water for lots of steam


Before baking, I brushed the bread with a mixture of egg and melted butter for nice color.


Bake in 250c & steam for about 15 minutes then remove the water and reduce the heat to 180c and bake for another 30-40 minutes. To make sure the bread is ready see if the bread produces a hollow sound when knocking on its bottom with your finger.


Beside fish, this bread goes well with almost anything from a full meal to chocolate spread (kids will love it)


Top image is from today, the lower one is a bit older but shows the exterior of the bread more nicely.



This is what my family gets for leaving me home alone :).


Its fun to enter a house when a bread is baking, the smell is beyond comparison so I don't think she objects


Until the next post


Ilan

emunab's picture
emunab

Everyone wants to make the perfect challah. It's easier than you think. Try this recipe:


Perfect Challah with Sweet Crumble Topping


I make them in twisted rolls and bake them in a 12 cup muffin tray and they come out shaped well and with great height. You cannot eat just a bite so make a lot of them!


Makes 32 rolls


Topping:
2 cups flour
2 cups sugar
16 - 19 tablespoons oil
Mix flour and sugar. Add oil (start with 16 tablespoons) and add until consistency is crumbly.


Challah Dough
5 lbs sifted flour (sometimes need to add 2 or 3 more cups)
1 cup sugar
4 packets RAPID RISE yeast
2 tablespoons salt
3 eggs
5 cups warm water
1/2 cup oil


Put 5 cups of flour in mixer. Add yeast, sugar, and salt. Mix in water, oil and eggs. Mix until well combined and it has no lumps. Add remaining flour one cup at a time. Knead in the mixer for 12 minutes.


Let dough sit in a warm place for 45 minutes to 1 hour. The dough should have at least doubled in size. Punch down dough and braid into loaves or use a few pieces and knot for rolls. Place in challah pans or in large muffin cups. Let rise 45 more minutes. Sprinkle generously with crumble topping. Bake in a 350 degree oven for 30 minutes.


For more great challah recipes, check out www.gourmetkoshercooking.com 

obrienforensics's picture

Breakfast Bun Called "Haystacks"

September 27, 2008 - 9:11am -- obrienforensics

Looking for old recipe for a sweet bun called "Haystacks." They were plain, sweet, yeasty, yellowish (like an egg dough) and shaped like a rounded haystack with a plain confectioner's sugar icing and toasted coconut sprinkled on top. They were bigger than a hot cross bun and smaller than a hard roll. They were not heavy or doughy and had only a dinner roll type crust. We would buy them back in the 1950's in a bakery in Bridgeport, CT for Sunday breakfast. There were a lot of different ethnic bakeries there so they might be based on some sort of braided European bread.

foolishpoolish's picture
foolishpoolish

[DELETED BY AUTHOR]

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - sweet