The Fresh Loaf

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dvalentine10's picture
dvalentine10

After a recent failed attempt to make Tartine's basic country loaf, I decided to change up my starter.

I now feed 50 grams of starter 50 g water + 50 g flour. I feed it every 12 hours. (On a related note, this seems a little too fussy. Do I really need to do this all the time?)

I store it in a glass pint jar on the top of my fridge. I keep it screwed shut.

The starter shows strong bubbling activity, though I can't get it to double in size. It maybe -just maybe - gets to be a third larger in a 12-hour span.

What's most amazing about it is that after 12 hours, it smells extremely strongly of apple vinegar. Also, when I unscrew the lid, the inside of the container is pressurized from all the yeast activity (I assume).

My question for you: Am I on the right track? Is something crazy happening here?

C-brook's picture

High ph in mother starter

September 28, 2012 - 9:06pm -- C-brook

Hi there--I am new to this site, but already I am grateful all the advice this site's members provide.  This is my first posting, and I was hoping someone could help me with something I am seeing in my mother starter.

I've been using Reinhart's starter method from Artisan Breads Every Day, where a mother culture is built from  a seed culture.  Each sourdough bread uses the mother culture to create a wild yeast starter for the bread.

flourchef's picture

Blending flours for sourdough

September 18, 2012 - 5:35pm -- flourchef

Hi everyone,

I'm a chef, passionate about bread, doing my best to offer real good bread to the our clients in the restaurant.

I had a couple of questions I was hoping someone could answer.

Are there any advantages/disadvantages of maintaining a sourdough with a blend of flours? For example feeding a sourdough a mixture of wheat and rye flour - and I mean continuously feeding it this mix of flours.

Stephanie Brim's picture
Stephanie Brim

This is what I've been doing for the last few days. I thought, since this was an interestinng case, that I should post a few things.

The first time I tried to make a starter I did it in the way I almost always do it: stone ground rye and water. For the first time in my starter-making, I got nothing. A few bubbles, but nothing ever concrete after the first few days. It was my first real failure since using the method mentiond in Sourdough 101. I decided that I should change out one of the variables to see what it was.

I remembered that I had a small bag of graham flour I was going to use to make smores cookies...and then I fell sick and ended up getting my gallbladder evicted. Cue finding it again, and then using it to make the second starter. And...resounding success. It's so much a success, even, that I could use it now. It's only been about five days, though, so I don't really plan to, but you know how you feel when something goes extremely *right* from the get-go.

In the mean time, I should mention that I've started feeding it with King Arthur plain bread flour and it's peaking in 4 hours most of the time, no more than 6.  It's taking basically *all the willpower I have* not to just bake with it right now. It smells sour, and yeasty, but not overly acidic. I just don't want to use it before it's really mature enough.

So...hi? And look forward to pictures from me as I bake. Again. Husband will be so thrilled at having ten different kinds of flour in the house again. :D

Also: I have been a member for four years and a week now. Time *flies*.

verve's picture

lovely bubble formation but not a great rise

September 10, 2012 - 3:25am -- verve
Forums: 

Hi everyone,

 

I had some amazing success with a few bakes and the last 2 have gone down in quality for some reason :( my previous successfull recipes had:

350 strong white flour

60 rye flour

100 spelt flour

300g water

14g salt

 

I had a great rise and a lot of bubbles but the one I made yesterday consisted of:

 

450 strong white

60g rye flour

300g water

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