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Sourdough

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linder's picture

Sourdough Oat Bread

February 24, 2013 - 6:38pm -- linder
Forums: 

A friend of mine passed along a recipe he made about 15 years ago.  It hails from Arkansas.  I am going to convert the recipe from cups and spoons to grams.  I have some questions regarding the use of sourdough starter, yeast AND baking soda in this bread.  Does it really need all three?  What would baking soda 'bring to the party' aside from some leavening and isn't there enough with all the sourdough and yeast anyway?  Would it be wise to cut back on some of the salt in the recipe since baking soda might add a bit of saltiness to the loaf? 

alhbamboo's picture
alhbamboo

It has been a while since I've visited so pardon if I'm going over well traveled ground.

The usual no-knead bread is composed of dough with high hydration. Presumably the high moisture content permits a very effective autolyse which results in gluten development without kneading. However the reulting dough is so slack that, unless the loaf is contained, it tends to collapse and does not gain much height even with oven spring. I've had success in maintaining shape after proofing in a banneton by cooling the loaf in the banneton after it has risen for a couple of hours - or overnight in the refriferator. The cold dough is considerably stiffer so that when it is teipped out of the banneton and hits the oven heat enough of a crust forms to maintain shape. I've tried this at a hydration of 78% using KA AP flour. For a 1 3/4 lb loaf I use 506 g flour, 384 g water, 11 g salt and 20 g of a 125% hydration starter. I bake in a cloche at 475F for 1/2 hr, remove the top and brown at 450F for 10-12 minutes. This results in a rather strong sourdough. If I use a large aliquot of starter (190g with the flour and water adjusted accordingly) I get a faster rise and a much weaker sourdough

My apologies if all this is old hat to the bakers out there but I was pleased to discover these techniques and use them to my satisfaction. I'm eager to hear theexperience of others.

4akitchenblog's picture
4akitchenblog

Hi all,

I am new here and this is my first post on The Fresh Loaf!

Today I would like to share my first attempt at baking Sourdough Boule with Japanese Clay Pot.

Japanese Clay Pot (a.k.a. Donabe) is a symbol of comfort food for Japanese people.

(Oh, by the way, I am Japanese :-))

Family members or friends come together around the table and share a meal out of one pot, so that you can build a sense of closeness, warmness...

I live in Santa Monica, California and my all family members live in Japan...Therefore, I felt all warm inside when I happened to find this Donabe.

"I want to bake BREAD with this clay pot!"

This idea just popped in my head :-)

 

The best part of using a clay pot (of course, a cast-iron pan, too) is you don't need to create the steam in your oven.

Because a closed clay pot trap all of the moisture from the dough, and that creates STEAM you need to get a perfect crust!

It's like a "masonry oven" inside your oven, if you will.

 

Ok, let's bake Donabe-bread!

This is a Sourdough Boule made with 36 hours fermentation.

————————————

Sourdough Boule

Makes 1 small loaf

Submitting this post to YeastSpotting

————————————

Recipe

225 g Bread flour

162 g water

4 g Salt

67.5 g 60% Firm sourdough starter

————————————

Formula

266.3 g Bread Flour (100%)

188.3 g Water (70%)

4.8 g Salt (1.8% )

————————————

Directions

1. Making the preferment dough --- In a mixing bowl, combine Bread Flour, Water and Sourdough seed starter / culture. 

    Let it preferment at room temperature for 12 hours.

2. Meanwhile, mix flour and water, cover it with plastic and Autolyse for for 12 hours.

3. Next day, mix starter into the dough and slap & fold for 1 minute.

4. Add salt and slap & fold for 1 minute or until the dough becomes a rough ball.

5. Let it rest for  30 minutes.

6. 1 set Stretch & Fold (1 set = right over left, left over right, bottom over top, top over bottom)

7. Let it rest for  30 minutes.

8. 1 set Stretch & Fold

9. Let it rest for  30 minutes.

10. 1 set Stretch & Fold

11. At a cooler place, let it rise until the dough just starts showing the yeast activity, about a third in size.

12. Put it in the fridge for 18-24 hours.

13. Pull it out of the fridge and leave it out for 1 hour.

14. Pre-shape the dough and let it rest for 15 minutes.

15. Shape into Boule and place into a mixing bowl lined with well-floured tea towel, seam-side up.

❉ Since I didn't have a round banneton, I used a mixing bowl lined with a tea towel and it just worked very well!

16. Final fermentation for 60 - 90 minutes.

17. 1 hour before you plan to bake, place your Donabe / Closed clay pot (must be completely DRY) on the middle shelf in the oven and preheat to 500°F.

 

18. Flip the bowl over so that the dough sits on the middle of a parchment paper.

19. Score the top of the Boule using a lame or a sharp, serrated knife.

20. Very very carefully open the lid (it's HOT!) and put the bread in the preheated Donabe, replace the lid and slip it back into the oven.

21. Turn the heat down to 480°F and bake the bread for 30 minutes with lid.

22. Turn the heat down to 450°F and bake for 10-15 minutes without lid.

23. Once the boule is nicely brown, turn the heat off and remove the boule from the Donabe and place directly on a rack in the oven for another 5-10 minutes.

24. Let them cool onto a rack.

Here is my first Donabe-Bread!

It turned out super nice! I got an amazing crust and silky-fluffy-holey crumb.

To be honest, I was quite surprised by this result. 

Even though I knew this "closed clay pot (La Cloche)" method through this post on a website BREAD IN FIVE,

I was not sure if I could get the same result with this Japanese Donabe or not...

No baking stone? No steam? Really?!

Yes, it really works! Donabe-bread is a new comfort food for me!

Yuko



isand66's picture
isand66

Okay, I'm back to my normal self again baking abi-normal breads.  I've made bread with corn flour before, but this time I wanted to use a slurry of roasted corn as well as use corn flour in the sourdough starter.  I also wanted to add some cheese and I thought some nice salty tasting Feta cheese would be a good combination.  The bread is just about to come out of the oven and I can smell the corn and feta cheese all throughout the house.  Not exactly a great thing to control my hunger while on a diet, but such is life.

This is a very wet dough, even though the overall hydration is only 72%, by adding the corn slurry it really increased the moisture content of the dough greatly.  I tried to bake this using a bundt pan mold from my wife's collection. I should have probably baked it in the mold but instead I removed the dough and it kind of flattened out and melded together into a big round blob shape.  I scored the loaf and it did get some good oven spring but next time I will bake it part of the way in the bundt pan and see what happens.

The final bread, while not resembling the intricate bundt mold I used, did come out great with a nice crispy crust and open and tasty crumb.  The bread is nice and moist and really came out amazing.

If you make this recipe, make sure to roast your corn first or you will lose that special sweet flavor that only roasted corn can impart.

I also used avocado oil which I am not sure what it actually added to the flavor profile, so feel free to substitute olive oil or any oil of your choice.

Directions

Starter Build 1

95 grams AP Flour (KAF)

55 grams Corn Flour (Bob's Red Mill)

50 grams Seed Starter at 65% hydration (If you use a 100% hydration starter you need to adjust the water amount and flour amount to compensate)

90 grams Water at room temperature.

Mix all the above ingredients together for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 4-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.  I usually do this the night before.

Starter Build 2

75 grams AP Flour

25 grams Corn Flour

75 grams Water at room temperature

Mix all the ingredients into the starter from step 1 until they are incorporated.  Cover with plastic wrap and let it sit for 4-6 hours or until doubled.  You can then refrigerate for up to 1  day or use in the main dough immediately.

Main Dough Ingredients

425 grams  Starter from above  (Note: you will have a little extra starter from above so make sure to weigh it out)

350 grams European Style Flour (KAF, you can sub Bread Flour with a little bit of Whole Wheat)

100 grams Durum Flour ( KAF)

75 grams Potato Flour (KAF)

50 grams Corn Flour (Bob's Red Mill)

77 grams Feta Cheese

17 grams Seas Salt or Table Salt

22 grams Avocado Oil (substitute olive oil if necessary)

425 grams Water at room temperature

155 grams Roasted Corn Slurry (Instructions below)

Total Flour (Including Starters and Seed Starter)

802 grams

Total Water (Including Starters and Seed Starter)

576 grams

Total Hydration: 72%

Procedure

Roasted Corn Slurry

I used a grill pan to do this since I still have too much snow on the ground to get to my barbecue.  Either way, you want to shuck 2 medium ears of corn, spray on or brush on some olive oil and add sprinkle some smoked hickory salt, onion powder, garlic powder and cheese powder. Wrap in aluminum foil or if you have the husks you can wrap them back in the husks.  Grill for about 15-20 minutes until you have a nice char on all sides.

Let the corn cool down and cut the corn from the cobs and place 155 grams in your food processor and give it a whirl until the corn starts resembling a slurry.  You don't want to overdo it since you want some texture to the corn to remain.

Main Dough

Mix the flours, oil and 385  grams of the water together in your mixer or by hand until it just starts to come together, maybe about 1 minute.  Let it rest in your work bowl covered for 20-30 minutes.  Next add the salt, starter (cut into about 7-8 pieces),and corn slurry and mix on low for a minute.  Add the rest of the water unless the dough is way too wet (note this is a very wet dough but you don't want soup).   Mix on low-speed for another 2 minutes.  Next add the cheese and mix for 1 additional minute.  Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl and with wet or oiled hands do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  (Feel free to do additional stretch and folds if necessary).  After a total of 2 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 1.5 to 2 hours.  Remove the dough and shape as desired.  As mentioned above I used a bundt pan mold.  I shaped the dough into 2 batards and placed both of them in the mold and sealed them together.

 

 Next I covered the dough with a moist tea towel.  The dough will take 1.5 to 2 hours depending on your room temperature.  Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock.

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 500 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

Right before you are ready to put them in the oven, score as desired and then add 1 cup of boiling water to your steam pan or follow your own steam procedure.

After 1 minute lower the temperature to 450 degrees.  Bake for 35-50 minutes until the crust is nice and brown and the internal temperature of the bread is 205 degrees.

Take the bread out of the oven when done and let it cool on a bakers rack before for at least 2 hours before eating.

mitchjayg's picture

Sourdough Bread - Can I proof and then retard

February 16, 2013 - 8:42am -- mitchjayg

Although I have been lurking here for a year, this is my first post. Let me start out by saying how terrific this site is and how much I have learned.  Thanks so much (and I bought Floyd's book - terrific!).

I have been baking sourdough breads, with my own starter, for about a year.  My usual process, from Emmanuel Hadjiandreou "How to Bake Bread" (wonderful, btw) is to stretch and fold every 10 minutes for about an hour, ferment for an hour, shape, proof for 4 hours, then bake.

evonlim's picture
evonlim

went back hometown to celebrate Chinese New Year with my parents and brothers. it was a long drive because of the heavy traffic. the journey took 7 hours instead of 3 .  i was really looking forward for mom's cooking!!

new year's eve dinner

... of course we started a.. 

Prosperity Toss, also known as lo hei (Cantonese for 撈起 or 捞起). It usually consists of strips of raw fish, mixed with shredded vegetables and a variety of sauces and condiments, among other ingredients. Yusheng literally means "raw fish" but since "fish (鱼)" is commonly conflated with its homophone "abundance (余)", Yúshēng (鱼生) is interpreted as a homophone for Yúshēng (余升) meaning an increase in abundance. Therefore, yusheng is considered a symbol of abundance, prosperity and vigor.

the dishes:

butter prawns :P

hainanese steam chicken.. 

 

sweet n sour pork ribs..

                  

my all time favorite soup, salted mustard green duck soup!!

this is my nephew, Christopher ( r u ready for PSY??) he loves gangnam song :)

 

and niece, Le Ann

 

1 st day new year's lunch

fried yellow noodles .. ( mom had to fried 3 portion of this, everyone was having second helping!)

 

 

left my starter for 4 days. refreshed it for 2 days before i bake.

this is a wholewheat with polenta, sunflower seeds and green olives sourdough bread

 (Formula adapted from Tartine) used a rye starter and white starter

the crumb shots... and yes it smells great and tasted delicous

 

 

 i had a short and sweet Chinese New Year celebration. started work 2 days ago. my brothers are still back at homtown!!

Happy Chinese New Year to all who celebrates, Gong Xi Fatt Chai

evonlim

 

 

baybakin's picture
baybakin


Sourdough Pizza: (Based on Maggie Glezer's Pizza Napoletana crust)

I've fiddled around with this recipe quite a bit, finding the right amount of levain and durum to suit my tastes, and here's what I have settled on.  The key to the big bubbles and flavor is a minimum 24 hours in the fridge, maximum 3 days.  There's lots of instructions on how to make good pizza in a home oven, my setup is as follows: Stone on the bottom of oven (gas in my case), pre-heated at 550F for an hour.  Pizza goes in on parchment, when the crust just starts to get toasty looking I put the broiler on until the top bubbles just begin to char.

150g Levain (100% hydration)
255g Water (room temp)
100g Fancy Durum Wheat Flour
325g Unbleached Bread Flour
10g Salt

Mix all ingrediants together until a rough dough is formed, let rest for 30 mins.
Kneed until smooth, rest on bench for an hour.
Divide into two equal pieces, form into balls.
Wrap in oiled plastic.
Place in fridge for 24-72 hours.

Take dough out of fridge at least one hour before baking.

Hope it works for others as well as it has worked for me.

 

Anomalous's picture
Anomalous

I've been refining the technique for making sourdough during the working week so that it's out of the oven in time for dinner. It's going pretty well now, and I'm regularly turning out loaves that I'm really pleased with.

It starts off the evening before, when I put 100g of sourdough starter and 200g strong white flour and 200g water into a tub, give it a mix and put the lid on to mature overnight ar room temperature. It seems that the longer I mature this levain, the more of a distinctive sourdough tangy quality shows up in the final loaf, but I'm not 100% sure of this. At the same time, I put 300g of strong white flour and 9g salt in a separate dry tub, just to save time next morning, and 100g water in a third container. Sometimes I use 100g wholemeal spelt or a bit of Kamut instead of some of the white flour, or I might toast some hemp seeds, crush them and put them with the dry flour for tomorrow.

Next morning.

07:00. The levain in the tub is nice and bubbly. I tip in the dry tub of 300g flour and 9g salt, plus the little tub of 100g water, then it gets a good mix for a minute or so, the lid goes back on and I go and shower.

07:15. The dough has developed a little. I tip it out onto the board and stretch and pull each corner of the dough up and into the middle as though forming a parcel. This goes on for a minute or so then I flip it over and form a round by scooping my hands half under it and pulling it toward me so the friction of the work surface pulls the surface of the dough taut. This takes about a minute and a half. I cover it with a bowl and get my breakfast.

 

07:30. The dough has relaxed a bit.

I flip it over and repeat the parcel-forming pulling and stretching then flip it again and form a round. This takes about a minute. The bowl goes on to cover it again and I go and get dressed.

07:45. The dough has more structure now.

Flip, pull, stretch, form a round, cover. This takes less than a minute. I finish getting ready for work.

08:00. Now the structure is more apparent. For the fourth time, I flip the dough, stretch and fold, form a round and now it's looking really taut and elastic.

I flour my proving basket and put in the dough, top side down, dust with a little semolina and put it in a big ziplock plastic bag, then into the fridge. Off to work.

19:00. 11 hours later the dough has nicely risen in the fridge. Not so much this time as it often does, but it will be OK.

 

 

I put the oven on to heat for 20 minutes at 230C with the cast iron combo cooker in the oven.

19:20. I dust the skillet of the combo cooker with semolina and tip the dough into it then slash it, put on the lid of the combo cooker and put it in the oven.

This seals in all the steam that would otherwise be lost, and prevents the crust from forming for the first 20 minutes so as to allow the maximum expansion of the dough.

 

19:40. I take the lid off, so that the crust can form. When the lid comes off, a cloud of steam escapes and the loaf is fully formed, though pale and soft.

Back in the oven. I usually turn it after another ten minutes so that it's evenly browned.

20:00. Finished. Out it comes and onto a rack to cool for at least 30 minutes.

I love the craggy, caramelised crust produced when using the combo cooker. You can hear the crust crackling as it cools.

It's a really nice loaf with a good shape, nice sourdough taste, but not the most tangy I've had, and a good, moist, open crust but without too many impractical big air holes. This is bread for sandwiches and I don't want everything to fall out.

The starter is one which was given to me on a training day at a Hackney bakery. I feed it with equal quantities of filtered water and stoneground wholemeal rye and I keep it in the fridge.

The technique works well for me and I can keep up the sourdough production during the working week, though only because of my leisurely one-hour pre-work routine.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

After losing the beet pink in our Valentine Rose bake we decided not to give up and try another method hoping the red or pink would stick around in the crumb somewhere.  This time, instead of using beet juice and pulp we used roasted chopped beets.  We didn’t expect the crumb to stay pink but we hope that there would be some red blotches that hung around.

  

After reading Ian’s post on his fine looking cream cheese butter and milk enriched rolls we decided to use that as a base.  Instead of the milk we used this time, we will use buttermilk next time of the pink does not remain.  We cut the sugar and added more whole grains (30%), some potatoes, the chopped beets.  The hydration came in at 78% if you ignore the cream cheese and beets.  We made enough for 5 rolls of about 140-1455 g each wet - a good size for hamburger buns.

  

I know that hamburgers don’t sound very romantic for Valentines Day but, if you only get to have them once a month and you really go all out with  the fixings; bacon, caramelized onions, mushrooms and various peppers with lettuce, tomatoes and grilled steak sweet and white potato fries its not so bad and better than nothing.  Especially if you have some kind of Pink Valentine Buns with some sesame seeds on top.

  

While the SD levain, where all the whole grains ended up with the exception of the malt, Toadies and oat flour,  was building itself up to speed we autolysed the flours and everything else except the beets and cream cheese.  Once the autolyse met the levain we did 10 minutes of French slap and folds.

  

This is a wet and sticky dough and bits will fly everywhere but stick to it and the dough will come together nicely,  After resting for 15 minutes the first of (2) S& F’s were done 15 minutes apart and the beets were incorporated on the 2nd set

 

 After another 15 minute rest the cream cheese was added and incorporated with Slap and folds until it disappeared.  Little red bits of beets will fly everywhere and stain what ever they hit so care is required if you care – but I couldn’t care less.  The dough was allowed to ferment on the heating pad for 90 minutes before being bulk retarded for 14 hours.

The next morning the dough was put on the heating pad for 2 hours to warm up before the rolls were shaped and placed on parchment supported by the mini oven’s vented broiler top.  After 2 more hours the mini oven was fired up to 425 F with the bottom of the broiler pan inside with 1 C of water for steam.

The rolls were brushed with melted butter and covered in a seed and salt mix thenan egg wash was applied.  The buns were loaded into the hot bottom of the broiler pan in the mini oven.  After 8 minutes the bottom of the broiler pan and steam was removed.  The temperature was turned down to 350 F, convection this time.

 

Every 5 minutes the rolls were rotated 180 degrees to ensure even browning.  After 15 minutes the rolls reached 205 F and removed from the oven to a cooling rack.  Total baking time was 23 minutes.

The rolls sprang nicely and spread perfectly for hamburger bun shape.  They browned nicely due to the butter and egg wash, they were slightly crispy too with the seed mix helping.  The crust did go soft as they cooled.  The pink went away on the outside again but to a lesser degree than last time so we have hope there might be some on the inside. 

Valentine Pink Chocolate Rose Left                                                               Pink Valentine Hamberger Bun Right

Well it wasn't pink on the inside but the crumb was tinted a yellowish brown from the beets and there were were more pink/red splotches throughout.  The crumb was very soft, moist glossy and open.  It smelled like a buttery croissant!  Can't wait to taste them tomorrow  They are gorgeous on the outside and in - perfect for the holiday

Caramelized onions, mushrooms. poblano and Hatch chillies, smoked  brown sugar and maple cured bacon, pickled jalapenos, dill pickle spear and aged white cheddar.

Lettuce, tomato, Beauregard, Japanese yams and russet  wedge baked fries.

Formula

Starter Build

Build 1

Total

%

SD Starter

20

20

5.97%

Kamut

12

12

3.58%

Spelt

13

13

3.88%

Dark Rye

13

13

3.88%

Whole Wheat

22

22

6.57%

Milk

60

60

17.91%

Total

140

140

41.79%

 

 

 

 

SD Starter Totals

 

%

 

Flour

70

20.90%

 

Water

70

20.90%

 

Starter Hydration

100.00%

 

 

Levain % of Total

21.60%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

Red Malt

2.5

0.75%

 

Toadies

5

1.49%

 

White Malt

2.5

0.75%

 

Oats

15

4.48%

 

Potato Flakes

15

4.48%

 

AP

225

67.16%

 

Total Dough Flour

265

79.10%

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

5

1.49%

 

Milk

150

44.78%

 

Dough Hydration w/o starter

56.60%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

Egg

44

13.13%

 

Butter

44

13.13%

 

Total

88

26.27%

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour w/ Starter

335

 

 

Milk

220

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Starter & Adds

78.15%

 

 

Total Weight

733

 

 

% Whole Grain

28.36%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chopped Roasted Beet

35

 

 

Cream Cheese

50

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chopped Beet and Cream Cheese

 

 

Not included in Hydration Calculations

 

 

 

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

I joined in on The 3 Twisted Sister’s GMA bake this week to do a Valentine Rose.  The premise was to do Vienna bread dough and make it into a Valentine Rose somehow.  The GMA’s posted their fine examples yesterday so this was a tough act, all 3 of them, to follow.  But, we had the last of our left over panettone to use up and on our side.

 

There were all kinds of new things for us on this bake.  We have never made a Vienna bread before and was sort of taken back by the sugar, egg, fat and milk in most of the recipes on the Internet.  It was sort of Challah like when it came right down to it.  There are some recipes out there without all of these enrichments but if you can use them all – why not?

  

We wanted to put our own twisted outlook into this bread so we decided to take it pink and savory only to change our mind later, after the savory was in, to take it sweet too.  The pink came from slicing ¼ of a beet and putting it into the mini chopper with 50 g of water and having the mini chopper do its best to liquefy it.  After straining, we were left with some really beet red juice and some red beet pulp.

  

We mixed the beet juice with the water for the dough and it ended up making a pretty as pink dough.  The beet pulp we sautéed with some beet greens and a clove of garlic to use for the filling in the rose roll-up thinking savory was the way to go and the red and green filling would be nice in this bread.

 

Then at the last minute Red Velvet Cake into my apprentices brain somehow and she thought that the dough was more sweet than savory and some cocoa powder and sugar added to the filling would make it taste more red velvety.  She also thought that some chocolate chips would also be a good addition to the filling since she and most ladies know roses and chocolates are the bare minimum for Valentines day.

  

I went ahead with Lucy’s recommendations wondering how the savory beet greens, beet pulp and garlic would jive with the chocolate and sugar.  We added a mix of whole grains, to the leavain only.  It was our usual rye, spelt, Kamut and whole wheat  and got the whole grains up to nearly 20%.

  

While the last feeding of the levain was ongoing, we autolysed the rest of the ingredients sans filling for 3 hours.  Once the autolyse and the levain came together we did 10 minutes of French slap and folds and then let the dough rest for 20 minutes before performing 3 sets of French folds on 20 minute intervals. 

  

After the last fold we allowed the dough to rest 10 minutes before dividing it in two and rolling each out to 10” x 18” rectangle.  We brush each with melted butter first then sprinkled on the beet green and pulp, sugar and cocoa mix followed by the chocolate chips.

  

We then rolled it up from the wide end, pinching the seams and ending up with a rope 18” long.  After finishing the 2nd rope, we split each with a paring knife down the middle ending up with 4 rope halves.

  

Two of the rope halves were crossed in the middle and then braided each direction making sure to keep the cut side up.  Once the other 2 half ropes were braided together, each of the 2 braided ropes were placed on a baking sheet covered in parchment by coiling each in a snail shape, one following the other, again trying to keep the cut sides up.  The result was one fairly big pink rose.

  

We let it proof on the counter for 90 minutes in a plastic trash can liner before refrigerating it for a 12 hour retard.  The next morning the rose was allowed to warm up and final proof for 4 hours before being brushed with an egg wash and going into the 425 F baking stone for 10 minutes of steam.  We used a combo Sylvia’s steaming pans and David’s 12” Iron skillet with lava rocks for the steam.

 

The rose had expanded nicely while doing its final proof but it also sprang very well in the oven too.  After 12 minutes the steam was removed and oven turned down to 350 F, convection this time.  The bread was turned on the stone every 8 minutes to ensure even baking.  The rose reached 205 F and we turned off the oven with the door ajar to allow the crust to further crisp on the stone for 8 more minutes.

 

The rose was removed from the oven to the cooling rack.  Total baking time was 30 minutes – 12 minutes of steam and 18 minutes without plus 8 minutes resting on the stone for 38 minutes total.  The rose browned nicely due to the egg wash.  It is nice looking rose where we hope the pink survived under the crust but, we will not know for a couple of hours.

This bread turned out to be shocking 3 ways.  One, the pink dough went away with just some red where the beet pulp and leaf saute was incorporated - I was robbed!  Two, you can't taste any beet either - not a trace - nor the garlic either.  Three, this bread tastes wonderful as a sweet chocolate bread. So if you want the pink to stay, put in some red food coloring :-)

The crumb is so soft, moderately glossy and fairly open.  Where the yellow tinge in the crumb came from is strange since it is  coming from a definite pink.  I guess the egg and butter finally won out ?  I love the taste of this bread but I also want tomake a straighten up Vienna bread without the goodies added in.  It also has to be a fantastic bread on the sweet side.

Formula

Starter Build

Build 1

Build 2

Build 3

Total

%

WWW & AP SD Starter

13

0

0

13

1.82%

Kamut

6

6

12

24

3.37%

Spelt

6

6

12

24

3.37%

Dark Rye

6

6

12

24

3.37%

Whole Wheat

6

6

12

24

3.37%

Water

24

24

48

96

13.47%

Total

61

48

96

205

28.77%

 

 

 

 

 

 

SD Starter Totoals

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

102.5

14.39%

 

 

 

Water

102.5

14.39%

 

 

 

Starter Hydration

100.00%

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

15.89%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

Red Malt

10

1.40%

 

 

 

Bread Flour

300

42.11%

 

 

 

AP

300

42.11%

 

 

 

Total Dough Flour

610

85.61%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

10

1.40%

 

 

 

Beet Infused Water

320

44.91%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration w/o starter

52.46%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

 

Sugar

40

5.61%

 

 

 

Egg

50

7.02%

 

 

 

NF Dry Milk powder

15

2.11%

 

 

 

Butter

40

5.61%

 

 

 

Total

145

20.35%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour w/ Starter

712.5

 

 

 

 

Beet Infused Water 320 & Water

422.5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Starter & Adds

65.68%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

1,510

 

 

 

 

% Whole Grain

19.30%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chocolate Chips

100

 

 

 

 

Beet, Almond & Cocoa Filling

120

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Filling is sauted beet leaves, 2 tsp ea cocoa & sugar

 

 

35 g of almond meal & left over beet juice pulp

 

 

 

 

 

 

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