The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

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MNBäcker's picture

Hobart D300 gear problem

December 25, 2012 - 1:42pm -- MNBäcker

Hi all.

Thought I'd throw this out here:

When turning on the mixer (an older 30-qt Hobart), the motor runs fine, but most of the time, first gear runs either very slowly or not at all. When I turn it off, switch it into second gear and then back into first (without turning it on), then switching it back on in first gear, it works fine. Is that a problem with the shifter? How do I get to the shifter - can I reach it from the control panel, or do I have to go through the top?

Any help would be appreciated.

jschoell's picture
jschoell


For some reason I wanted to make a loaf with a purple swirl... probably because purple is not a standard bread color, and I am not a standard bread man. 
I tried this recipe and it turned out good. Just divide the recipe in half, and make two seperate doughs. For one of the doughs, replace the water with an equal amount of liquid from boiled red cabbage. I took a head of red cabbage, shredded it, then cooked it with 2 cups of water in a large pot for 30 minutes. Strain the liquid out, let it cool, and use it to make the purple half of the dough. 


Ingredients: (total for both doughs)




  • 4 cups bread flour

  • 1/2 teaspoon instant yeast

  • 2 teaspoons salt

  • 2 1/4 cups water




Instructions: (remember you are making TWO doughs)

  1. Combine all the dry ingredients (flour, yeast, salt) in the large bowl and stir with spoon for about 15 seconds.

  2. White No-Knead Bread Dough mixedAdd water to the bowl and stir for about 1 or 2 minutes (it won’t look that good but that doesn’t matter).

  3. Cover the top of the bowl loosely with plastic wrap.

  4. Let sit on counter top for about 12 to 16 hours (I ussually do this for about 13 hours), the dough will look all bubbly on the top when done rising.

  5. Generously sprinkle flour the top of your clean counter top or a cutting board (don’t worry about using too much flour, it won’t hurt it).

  6. Slowly pour the dough from the bowl on to the floured surface, using the silicone spatula to help it peal off the sides of the bowl.

  7. Sprinkle a little flour on top of the dough and rub your hands together with flour.

  8. With you hands, gently stretch each dough out to a rectangle shape.

  9. Lay the purple dough on top of the white dough.

  10. Roll up the dough from one end to the other.

  11. Place the dough into a lightly greased bread pan (seam side down).

  12. Let dough rise till it is a bit above the top of the bread pan (about double in size or 1 to 1.5 hours).

  13. Pre-heat the oven to 450 degrees.

  14. Place bread in the oven for 30 minutes.

  15. Remove from oven, dump bread out on a cooling rack or your counter top and allow it to cool.





No detectable flavor from the cabbage, but the color just begs, "eat me!"

 

cdnDough's picture

Stiff starter is slow to rise

January 3, 2009 - 6:21pm -- cdnDough

I've been working with Leader's stiff levain for a few months now and it has always ripened (doubled in volume) within 8-12 hours after feeding.  My usual routine has me feeding and baking 2x per week.  However, after a few days in the fridge, it seems to be taking its time today.  It has risen about 1.5x after 24 hrs this time.  I'm thinking that I may skip baking with it and try a few days of feeding to see if it perks up.  Does anyone have any ideas as to what else I can try?  Thanks.

fredsambo's picture
fredsambo

Well I finally went ahead and signed up, I have been a reader for quite some time. I am a professional baker by trade, but love to mess around in my conventional kitchen as well. I needed some old dough for my next adventure, so I decided to make a nice straight yeasted bread. I also noticed that some of the bakers cover the loaves in the oven to simulate injected steam, so I decided to try it!

 

The formula for the dough is pretty simple and based on Joe Ortiz's Direct-Method Compagnon:

 

1/4 ounce active dry yeast

 

1 3/4 cups cold tap water

 

3 2/3 cups King Arthur Bread Flour

 

1 3/4 teaspoons salt

 

I mixed the yeast with a little bit of warm water and then poured the rest of the water into the wet mixture. After adding two cups of the flour, using my Kitchen Aid Artisan mixer, I mixed with the paddle on first speed for two minutes. Then added the salt and the rest of the flour, graduating to the hook. Then I mixed on first speed until the flour was somewhat incorporated, and then 12 - 15 minutes on 2nd speed. The doulgh was velvity and somewhat slack when it came off the mixer.

Next I cut three small pieces out and shaped them into little boules. I set all three boules in the fridge, in glass bowls, coverd with plastic wrap.

 

About four and a half hours later I grabbed two of the boules from the fridge (the other is my old dough for tomorrow), flattened and reshaped them, and then covered them with a cloth, on a floured board, for about 45 minutes to an hour.

 

I scored them and put them right on the stone in my oven at 450 degrees, covered by a large cooking pot. I prepped this "cover" by pouring hot water out of it right before I put it in the oven, being careful not to touch the boules with the cover. After 12 minutes I carefully removed the cover and then baked them for another 15-17 minutes.

 

So here is the result:

 

 

 

I am pretty happy with the look of the crust, the crumb is dense as I expected from such a short proof time. Overall it is dense and chewy but with zero taste:

 

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