The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

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tororm's picture
tororm

After picking up a large batch of assorted grains and seeds I set to making a multigrain spelt loaf. I firstly soaked a mixture of the grains (which I unfortunately did not weigh) and mixed into a dough of white spelt with 13% gluten flour for a total hydration of 75%. I also added a teaspoon of cocoa for a little colour. 

 

Although a little overproofed, resulting in no oven spring, this was pretty much the best loaf I have ever made in terms of the consistency of crumb and taste. 

ilan's picture
ilan

My path of research in bread making led me another step. This week I made yet another sandwich-bread and added different stuff into it.


I saw that in the several recipes most of the liquid in such bread consist of milk. It should make the bread richer in flavor as milk in oppose to water have a taste and in addition it contain some percent of fat.


All is good and well in theory. I already baked bread with water and bread with milk.


This time, I made two batches of the same recipe but in the second I replaced 2/3 of the liquid with milk.


Both bread looked almost the same. If there was any visual difference I failed to see it.


The crust on the milk bread was softer while the one with water was crunchier. There is a meaningful difference… I like both.


Another thing I wanted was thinner crust. So instead of baking at high temp with steam for 15 minutes (as I done in my previous bread) I reduce the time to 10 minute. The crust was good but thinner.


 To enrich the bread I added Pecans and Pumpkin seeds to the dough and sprinkled the top of the bread with Sunflower & Pumpkin seeds.


I didn’t use any preferment here, It was aimed to be a quick bread making. So, I used 3 teaspoons of yeast and 1 teaspoon of sugar. This reduced raise time to 1 hour + 1 hour. I must try this same bread with the longer method to check the flavor difference. But this will be my project for next week J


I didn’t punch down the dough after the first rise. I just roll it out of the bowl and formed it. It looses enough air in any case.


Additional thing I tried with both loaves was to score them right after I formed them into loaves. This is because when I try to score the bread right before baking, it loose height. I should look for a razor blade as my knives (sharp as they are – 8” knife is too big) are not good enough for this job.


The Dough:


-       3 1/4 cups flour


-       3 teaspoons yeast


-       1 teaspoon sugar


-       1 ½ cup of water (replace 1 cup of water with milk)


-       1 ¾ teaspoon of salt


-       ½ cup of chopped Pecans


-       ¼ cup of Pumpkin seeds


-       ½ egg


-       ½ egg for glazing


-       Sunflower seeds for topping


Mix the flour, yeast, sugar, egg and water (or milk) into a unified mixture and let rest for 20 minutes.


Add the salt Pecans and Pumpkin seeds knead for 10 minutes. Let rise for 60 minutes.


Form into a loaf and let rise for another hour.


Bake in high temperature with steam for 10 minutes.


Reduce the heat (180-170c) and bake for another 40 minutes.




Until the next post


Ilan


 


 

kimes's picture

Can a whole wheat starter be used in French Bread?

March 19, 2010 - 8:27pm -- kimes

I have recently been looking through books on whole grain breads.  I have yet to see any information on a whole wheat french bread and am wondering if it is because of the unique qualities of this type of bread.


I really have two questions:


1) Is there a whole wheat French Bread recipe available, that still maintains the slight sourness, airy texture, and large holes?


2)  Would using a whole wheat sourdough(ish) starter effect the flavoring?  Would any adjustments need to be made?


 


Thanks for your imput!

ronb's picture

Wholemeal seed & grain flour

January 18, 2010 - 10:34am -- ronb
Forums: 

I have been using Allinsons Wholemeal seedd & grain flour trying to make a 2lb loaf in a Murphy's Bread Maker. I have been following the recipe for a brown loaf using the afore mentioned flour which suggests 4 cups. When I have added all the ingredients, the dough seems far too wet and sticks to the bottom of the bread pan.


As a new chap on the block so to speak, would anyone be kind enough to send me a recipe which will work if I continue to use Allinsons Wholemel Seed & Grain flour plus my Murphy's bread machine?

chouette22's picture
chouette22

Last weekend I gave Susan’s Sourdough Boule another try after it had come out with a crumb that was too dense the first time around. Since the ingredients were exactly the same as in one of Susan’s recipes (I used KA bread flour and pre-soaked flax seeds), the culprit could only be the starter. This time I made sure it was up to speed and strength after feeding it twice before using it and it happily produced the desired results:


 


  


 


It tasted wonderfully and I'll certainly make it again!


The other bread I made was the Sourdough Seed Bread (“Bread” p. 176). There had been two recent posts about this great recipe and I really wanted to try it. We absolutely LOVE it. My husband thought that my loaves should be bigger than the recent ones I made, thus I baked the entire recipe into one huge loaf, it weighed in at 1.7 kg (3.75 lbs)!!


 


 


   


A bit of a challenge to slice... This bread will be a staple in my repertoire, no doubt!


 

Nathan's picture
Nathan

Greetings,


Long-time lurker, first-time poster. Although I haven't been active on the Fresh Loaf, I have spent a lot of time reading, learning from and enjoying the content posted by fellow bread enthusiasts. Now, I hope to become a more active member of this site, hence this blog entry which serves as a brief introduction of myself as well as some pictures of one of my recent bakes.


I've been baking on a regular basis for about three years now. I enjoy baking all sorts of bread, though I have to say I'm a sourdough junkie at heart. Originally from Cleveland, Ohio, I've been living in Madrid, Spain for the past ten years.


The following photos are of a recent bake of the sourdough seed bread found in Hamelman's Bread (p. 176). This is a lovely bread and I find myself baking it time and time again.


Lastly, I'd like to thank all members of the Fresh Loaf for their time and dedication. Your knowledge and help have made me a better baker.


Nathan


Hamelman's Sourdough Seed Bread



Hamelman's Sourdough Seed Bread - Crumb



shakleford's picture
shakleford

A few weeks ago, I finally got a copy of Peter Reinhart's Whole Grain Breads.  While I've read the book (most of it several times), I hadn't actually tried any of his recipes until this weekend.  Yesterday and today, I made the Whole Wheat Sandwich Bread (his basic formula) for sandwiches next week and a modified version of his German-Style Transitional Many Seed Bread to have with dinner.  Both came out great, but since the many seed bread was the more interesting to me, that's what I decided to write about.

In his book, Reinhart uses the term "transitional" to refer to breads that contain some white flour along with the whole wheat flour.  All of his transitional recipes have a 100% whole wheat counterpart except for the many seed bread.  As a general rule, I try to follow recipes as written once before I begin tweaking, but decided against that approach this time.  Instead, I decided to replace the white flour in the biga with whole wheat flour and the whole wheat flour in the soaker with millet flour.  Why?

  • I'm not opposed to using white flour, but prefer the taste of whole wheat in most circumstances.
  • I was craving a dense bread, and using a gluten-free flour is certainly one way to achieve that.
  • I thought that the mild, nutty flavor of millet flour would complement the seeds nicely.
  • I had a need to use up some millet flour (hey, at least I'm honest).
  • My (admittedly weak) understanding is that the highest-gluten flour should be in the biga, so I put the millet flour in the soaker instead.
Under the original formula, this bread contains 44.4% white flour, 44.4% whole wheat flour, and 11.1% rye flour.  Under my version, the percentages were 33.3% millet flour, 55.6% whole wheat, and 11.1% rye.  The recipe as written was also a bit large for me, so I reduced all amounts to 2/3 of what is in the book.

On Friday, I mixed the biga and soaker following the instructions in the book.  The soaker ended up a bit wetter than I wanted (I didn't realize how little water the millet flour would absorb), but other than that, things went smoothly.  On Saturday, I combined these items with the remaining ingredients.  Below you can see a photo of the final dough ingredients before mixing.  In addition to a small amount of flax seeds in the soaker, the final dough contains pumpkin, sesame, and sunflower seeds.  Summed up, these are 33.3% of the weight of the flour -- definitely "many seed".

I followed Reinhart's instructions for mixing and kneading.  Although the large amount of millet flour meant that the final dough did not pass the windowpane test, I was pleased that the normally coarse texture of the millet flour was greatly lessened as a result of the soaker.  As instructed, I let the final dough rise for around 50 minutes, then formed a batard and allowed it to proof for around 50 minutes.  The rises were somewhat lackluster, but much higher than I expected with such a high percentage of millet flour.  I baked with steam (something I'm still fairly new at) using Reinhart's instructions, but had no oven spring to speak of (probably as a result of overproofing yet again).  Since I set out to make a dense loaf however, this didn't bother me too much.  Crust and crumb photos are below:

The bread was certainly packed with seeds, but I found it to be delicious and very satisfying.  The millet flour contributed just the flavor I was hoping.  I tried toasting a few pieces, and the bread was even better this way; the toasting really brought out the flavor of the seeds.  However, one mistake became apparent with the first bite:  it was probably a bad idea to use whole pumpkin seeds.  I always eat them this way, so I tend to forget that there's an alternative, but the hulls definitely made thorough chewing important (and also a bit of a workout).  Sure enough, in looking at the photos of this bread in the book, it's pretty clear that hulled pumpkin seeds were used.

Overall, I'm still happy with this bread, and will definitely make it again.  This may also be the best use of millet flour I've found so far (though admittedly, those looking for a lighter loaf would probably want to use no more than 10%).  The pumpkin seed oversight is a bit of a disappointment, but still far better than the time I accidentally used whole sunflower seeds in a bread!

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