The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

scoring

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leavenguy's picture

scoring Tartine sourdough

March 17, 2012 - 10:36pm -- leavenguy

 

Hello - I'm having some problems with scoring Tartine country bread. I use a sharp razor but it still catches on the surface and drags rather unevenly in the dough. It seems as though the surface is not taut or dry enough. Is this a matter of putting more flour on it? The loaves are otherwise excellent.

Please let me know if you are able to help

 

Thank you.

goodforbusiness's picture

Rye and spelt sourdough

March 12, 2012 - 6:26am -- goodforbusiness

I've been experimenting with the formulas from Dan Lepard's The Handmade Loaf recently and this weekend I decided to take another crack at his rye and barley sourdough. Except that I found myself without any barley flour! I decided to substitute spelt instead, even though I really have a lot of trouble working with spelt. I've also been practicing my scoring, trying to be more confident in my slashing and experimenting with different patters. Here's what I ended up with:

 

bredtobake's picture

Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears...

March 4, 2012 - 6:12pm -- bredtobake

Hi Everyone,

I'm seeking advice on how to get those really nice "ears" that tartine bread is known for. I am using the standard country bread recipe. I seem to get a pretty good oven spring, but my score marks seem to just "stretch" rather than "burst", if that makes any sense. Anyway, I've attached a photo of my last bread to show you what I mean. How do I get those nice "ears"?

Cheers,

Jon

Gan's picture

Help, My bread isn't springing and my scoring is useless!

February 7, 2012 - 12:42pm -- Gan
Forums: 

I'm a new user and a somewhat-new bread baker.  I've been making french bread and have been having problems in the oven.  I don't know if these problems are related, but my bread doesn't rise much in the oven the the scores don't open up when I bake.  Sometimes the bread will split elsewhere while baking.

Here's what I usually do:

Proof yeast (usually one packet, 2 1/4 tsp) in 1/3 cup warm water for ~5 minutes

Mix 3 1/2 cups AP flour (organic Whole Foods brand) with 2-2 1/2 tsp salt and 3 1/2 tsp vital wheat gluten.

sehenley's picture

Baguettes splitting in wrong place

August 11, 2011 - 3:43am -- sehenley
Forums: 

Hi

I'm having reall problems with homemade baguettes, I am slashing the top but the bread always splits on the side near the bottom and the slashes never open up properly. I have a proper bakers Lame, and I use this technique

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3QdzHuhJ-ls

But no matter what I do, different oven temp, wetter or drier dough, the slashes on the top never open properly and the split is on the side near the base.

Any advice would be much appreciated.

Thanks

Sam

KHamATL's picture

Baguette Scoring Help Request

July 24, 2011 - 7:35pm -- KHamATL

Hi everyone,

I have been reading posts on the forum for many months now and trying to gain wisdom on the topic of baguette scoring.  I have read almost every post on the subject but can't seem to get it right.  Out of about a dozen attempts at baguettes, I have successfully generated a nice ear/grigne one time.  Strangely enough, it was on the 3rd attempt.  Here is a picture:

nate9289's picture
nate9289

As I promised on my last entry, I took pictures of my bakery during work this morning.  I'll explain some of the methods and processes that we employ as well, since each boulangerie does things its own way.  We are an artisan bakery and use no pre-fabricated frozen dough or chemical additives.  The levain for most of the breads (excluding the standard baguettes) is all natural, made with apple juice we press ourselves.


I work with a small staff of two bread bakers and one pastry chef - the patron or boss makes the specialty cakes.  The bakers work from 3am/5am until 9am/11am every day, and the pastry chef from 5am until afternoon.  Breads not baked in the morning are baked by the boss in the wood-fired oven two or three times during the day, but all the work is done before 10am except for the specialty cakes.  The short hours and small staff keep costs way down while managing to put out between 800 to 1100 loaves daily in about 30-40 different varieties.  While some credit should be given to the equipment, most belongs to the two bakers themselves who are incredible to see in action.  I'm thankful to be learning from them!  So, the pictures:



 


We use an 8-deck hearth oven at 310 deg. C, or 590 deg. Fahrenheit.  Loaves are taken out of the retarder in the morning and let proof before going in the oven.  The first baker arrives at 3am and takes them out, mixing other doughs to let bulk ferment during the early morning hours.  Around 5am the other baker arrives and the oven gets going.  One baker forms baguettes to be retarded that afternoon and night while the other bakes the breads from the day before.  At 9am everything for the day has been baked and we weigh all the specialty doughs, which have been fermenting, and fashion all the loaves, and then they go in the retarder until the next morning.  This is the process for 90% of the breads.



 


 


The specialty doughs go in the spiral mixer and the normal white dough goes in the large oblique mixer.



 


 


Baguettes during pre-shaping:



 


Here are some loaves about to go in the oven.  The dark ones are baguettes aux céréales and the one with the ring is bread made with hazelnut flour.  The second picture show baguettes nouvelles, explained below.




 


For the baguettes nouvelles (new baguettes), the dough undergoes a 72 hour bulk fermentation in the refrigerator and then is formed with a hydraulic machine to not deflate the gas.  Notice the machine and the metal grill below:



 


Here are some loaves fresh from the oven: round miches, large pain paysan, regular baguettes on the oven loader, dusted baguettes de tradition, and baguettes nouvelles in the case.


 


 


 



 


My favorite bread we bake each Saturday is the grand pain paysan, a slab of dough weighing 5kg, or 11lbs!  It's sold by the kilo.



 


I don't do much with pastries - one absolute master pastry chef makes them all.  Fresh strawberries are all the rage right now, and we're doing a buy 3 strawberry pastries, get 1 free deal.  The picture with the almonds and raisins shows mini-kugelhopfs, the special pastry of my neighbor region Alsace.


 


 


 


Finally, some pictures from inside the store.  Most boulangeries suffer from either an overly-elaborate or overly-dull store space, often too small.  Not the case here!  From the enormous wood-fired oven imported from Mexico - producing an unbelievably tasty bread - to the lime green walls, it's a great place to find whatever suits your palate.


 


 


 


 



 


At home after a long morning of work, enjoying a baguette nouvelle.  Hope you've enjoyed the pictures!



Nate


 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder


These are a couple of 755 gm bâtards of Hamelman's Pain au Levain I baked today. I think they illustrate the points made recently in discussions of scoring, ears and bloom, for example in Varda's topic To ear or not to ear.


To quote Michel Suas from Advanced Bread and Pastry again,



If the angle is not achieved and the cut is done with the blade vertical to the loaf, the two sides of the dough will spread very quickly during oven spring and expose an enormous surface area to the heat. The crust will begin to form too soon - sometimes before the end of oven spring - penalizing the development of the bread. If the cut is properly horizontal, the sides of the loaf will spread slower. The layer of dough created by the incision will partially and temporarily protect the surface from the heat and encourage a better oven spring and development. (Suas, pg. 116.)



These loaves were scored with a razor blade mounted on a metal lame. The blade was held at a 30º angle. The cuts were about 1/2 inch deep. I think the coloration of the bloom attests to the slow spread to which Suas refers.




I think you can clearly see three distinct colors in the bloomed crust, progressively lighter in color from right to left, with the lightest color being that under the ear. As the cut opens up during the bake, it does so slowly over a prolonged period. The darkness of the bloom demonstrates the length of time each area was directly exposed to the oven's heat. The ear keeps the area under it sheltered from the heat so it doesn't form a crust, but, as the bloom widens, the previously sheltered area becomes uncovered by the ear, and it begins to brown.


Scoring with the blade perpendicular to the loaf surface thus results in less bloom, and the blooming is terminated sooner in the bake. The coloration of the bloom is more uniform. An example - a Vermont Sourdough I also baked today:



I hope this helps clarify the point of the ear - how you get it and why you might want to.


David


Submitted to YeastSpotting

Ryan Sandler's picture
Ryan Sandler

Or so it would appear.  Just look at these innocent, unbaked rolls.  See how happy they are:



And then see them after being baked:



Ahh! Demon rolls!


Just wanted to share. :)

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