The Fresh Loaf

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sandwich loaf

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littlelisa's picture

percentage whole wheat in a white sandwich loaf formula

May 15, 2011 - 12:21pm -- littlelisa

In my ongoing adventures with Peter Reinhart's Crust and Crumb, I decided to try one of the sandwich loaves. However, PR only presents a 100% white and 100% whole wheat in this book, and I really wanted to do a half-half. So did a  biga starter today using 2 cups white and 1.5 cups whole wheat flour, figuring I'd use the white sandwich loaf recipe and adapt it using around 40% ww flour. Any advice on this?

Cheers

Lisa

jschoell's picture
jschoell

I was eating a bowl of Cream of Wheat for the first time in ten years. That is the only inspiration for this loaf. I think a souerdough starter would work well with this recipe. 


Whip up a 75% hydration Biga with 2 c bread flour, let it chill in the fridge 24 hrs. For the final dough, combine 1.5 c bread flour, 1.5 c ap flour, .75 c farina, 2 tbps kosher salt, 1.5 tsp instant yeast, the biga torn up, and about 1.5 c water. Mix with paddle until combined, switch to hook and knead for 5 min. Let dough rest 2 min, then knead another 3 min. Transfer to large oiled bowl. Stretch and fold every 20 min for an hour. Shape into loaves and refrigerate for 12-24 hrs. Bake at 450F for 15 min then 400F for 20 min.







This makes a killer mozzarella and tomato sandwich!


 


 

breadmantalking's picture
breadmantalking



 


There are, of course many variations of the perfect sandwich loaf. Probably every bread-baking culture has its version. And probably a lot depends on the kind of sandwiches the people of the culture like to eat. So, for instance, Jewish sandwich bread, at least those breads from Eastern Europe, tend to be heavy on the rye flour, sometimes with caraway and always smothered with something like corned beef and onions. In France the perfect sandwich bread is a baguette-like roll called 'pain ordinaire', or ordinary bread. This is no ordinary bread, however. It is typically loaded up with a good hard, sharp cheese and washed down with strong coffee. 


 


This bread is Italian in origin, at least from its herb content, but the style is definitely French. A hybrid of sorts. The original contained some coarsely ground black pepper, which I have omitted since I know my customers. Personally I like food with a little heat, but my house mates.... not so much. Anyway, this bread, because of the added herbs and spices is great for sharp cheeses, or pickled or cured meats (cold cuts, corned beef, sausage) and even crispy veggies. Or a combination. It has a fairly close crumb, which could be more open if you leave to rise a little longer. The crust is only a little chewy. But I actually like it the way it is, since the density helps hold the contents of the sandwich. Enjoy!!


 


Here's What You'll Need:


4 cups AP flour


3/8 cup uncooked corn meal (coarse - polenta)


2 tsp. granulated garlic


3 tsp. dried parsley


3 tsp. dried oregano


3/4 Tbs. yeast


2 tsp. salt


about 1 1/2 cups warm water


 


Here's What You'll Need To Do:


1. Mix all the dry ingredients, including the herbs and the yeast together and mix thoroughly.



 


2. Add the water mixing as you pour it to form a rough dough.


 


3. Knead this mixture on a lightly-floured tabletop for about 10 minutes until it becomes quite smooth. It will be a little tacky, but smooth, and not at all sticky. Adjust the flour and/or water as needed to get the right texture.



 


4. Place the kneaded dough into a lightly-oiled bowl, turn to coat, then cover and let it rise in a warm place until doubled. This will take 1 1/2 to 2 hours. You may stretch and fold the dough halfway through if desired to develop the gluten more fully.


 


5. Form into a loaf shape and place into a prepared loaf pan. Let the dough rise again until it is about 1 inch (2 1/2 cm) above the lip of the pan.



 


6. Bake in a preheated oven at 350 F (175 C) for about 45 minutes. In a convection oven, bake at 300 F (150 C).



 


6. Cool on a rack.


jschoell's picture
jschoell


This was very easy and tastes better than your average sliced bread... It looks cool too!


 


Ingredients: (for white dough)



  • 2 cups bread flour

  • 1/4 teaspoon instant yeast

  • 1 teaspoon salt

  • 1 1/4 cups water


Ingredients: (for beet dough)


Do the same as the white dough in a seperate bowl, replacing the water with beet juice. To obtain beet juice, I shredded 3 pounds of fresh beets, loaded the shreddings into a mesh bag, and squeezed  out the juice. I recovered about a cup, so I added water to make 1 1/4 cups. 



Instructions: (remember you are making TWO doughs)



  1. Add all the dry ingredients (flour, yeast, salt) into two bowls and stir with spoon for about 15 seconds.

  2. Add water to one bowl and beet juice to the other bowl. Stir for about 1 or 2 minutes.

  3. Cover the top of the bowl loosely with plastic wrap.

  4. Let sit on counter top for about 12 to 16 hours (I ussually do this for about 13 hours), the dough will look all bubbly on the top when done rising.

  5. Generously sprinkle flour the top of your clean counter top or a cutting board (don’t worry about using too much flour, it won’t hurt it).

  6. Slowly pour the dough from each bowl on to the floured surface, using the silicone spatula to help it peal off the sides of the bowl.

  7. Sprinkle a little flour on top of the dough and rub your hands together with flour.

  8. With you hands, gently stretch each dough out to a rectangle shape.

  9. Lay the beet dough on top of the white dough.

  10. Roll up the dough from one end to the other.

  11. Place the dough into a lightly greased bread pan (seam side down).

  12. Let dough rise till it is a bit above the top of the bread pan (about double in size or 1 to 1.5 hours).

  13. Pre-heat the oven to 450 degrees.

  14. Place bread in the oven for 30-40 minutes.

  15. Remove from oven, dump bread out on a cooling rack or your counter top and allow it to cool.






There is a delicious flavor from the beets...somewhat salty, a bit savory, and a smidge of sweet. The deep cherry red color emitted from the crust, but inside it lost the red component and is a boring brown. I think I'll try the beet dough on the outside next time.


Does anyone know why this happens?

jschoell's picture
jschoell


For some reason I wanted to make a loaf with a purple swirl... probably because purple is not a standard bread color, and I am not a standard bread man. 
I tried this recipe and it turned out good. Just divide the recipe in half, and make two seperate doughs. For one of the doughs, replace the water with an equal amount of liquid from boiled red cabbage. I took a head of red cabbage, shredded it, then cooked it with 2 cups of water in a large pot for 30 minutes. Strain the liquid out, let it cool, and use it to make the purple half of the dough. 


Ingredients: (total for both doughs)




  • 4 cups bread flour

  • 1/2 teaspoon instant yeast

  • 2 teaspoons salt

  • 2 1/4 cups water




Instructions: (remember you are making TWO doughs)

  1. Combine all the dry ingredients (flour, yeast, salt) in the large bowl and stir with spoon for about 15 seconds.

  2. White No-Knead Bread Dough mixedAdd water to the bowl and stir for about 1 or 2 minutes (it won’t look that good but that doesn’t matter).

  3. Cover the top of the bowl loosely with plastic wrap.

  4. Let sit on counter top for about 12 to 16 hours (I ussually do this for about 13 hours), the dough will look all bubbly on the top when done rising.

  5. Generously sprinkle flour the top of your clean counter top or a cutting board (don’t worry about using too much flour, it won’t hurt it).

  6. Slowly pour the dough from the bowl on to the floured surface, using the silicone spatula to help it peal off the sides of the bowl.

  7. Sprinkle a little flour on top of the dough and rub your hands together with flour.

  8. With you hands, gently stretch each dough out to a rectangle shape.

  9. Lay the purple dough on top of the white dough.

  10. Roll up the dough from one end to the other.

  11. Place the dough into a lightly greased bread pan (seam side down).

  12. Let dough rise till it is a bit above the top of the bread pan (about double in size or 1 to 1.5 hours).

  13. Pre-heat the oven to 450 degrees.

  14. Place bread in the oven for 30 minutes.

  15. Remove from oven, dump bread out on a cooling rack or your counter top and allow it to cool.





No detectable flavor from the cabbage, but the color just begs, "eat me!"

 

mdunham21's picture
mdunham21

This weekend has been a smorgasbord of baked goods.  Friday afternoon i mixed together a poolish with the intentions of making poolish baguettes the following day.  I let the poolish sit out until it was nice and bubbling then retired it to the refrigerator for the next day.  I removed the poolish from the refrigerator and brought it to room temp while I prepared the main dough. 


I was working off of Peter Reinhart's poolish baguette recipe from BBA.  I sifted the wheat flour to remove the bran, i'm not sure if my sieve was fine enough to remove all the bran but it removed a large proportion of it.  I'm going to be a bit lazy in my blogging tonight and just post a few pictures, which will not include crumb shots because the crumb turned out piss poor.


I had to find something to do with the left over bran i sifted from the wheat flour.  I decided to make bran muffins, which I have never made before but thought i would try.  The recipe was a crap shoot a little bit of this and a little bit of that.  I used a small portion of wheat flour to AP added some sugar some molasses, yeast, and buttermilk and an egg.  I topped the muffins with oats and baked them in a 350 degree oven until a toothpick came out clean.  I can't say I've ever had a bran muffin so I have nothing to compare them to, they seem to taste fine.  


I caught an episode of Diners Drive in's and Dives earlier this week, Guy Fieri happened upon a restaurant that featured cranberry and wild rice french toast.  The two ingredients seem like such an odd combination to me and I had to try it.  I pieced together a recipe and made a large sandwich loaf with a smaller free form loaf to go with it.  Needless to say, I can't wait for breakfast in the morning, I just wish I had some fresh maple syrup to go with it.  


As if this wasn't enough for one day, I decided to make sandwich loaves for the upcoming week.  The loaves are basic white loaves from The Bread Bible.  I don't eat a lot of white bread but this will have to do this week until I can make some whole grain loaves.  


Nope, not done yet.  The poolish baguette recipe calls for 7 ounces of poolish, which leaves a substantial amount for another application.  I am tossing around the idea of making a poolish pizza crust tomorrow, although I am still uncertain about a recipe at this point.  I have also decided to start the bread baker's apprentice challenge tomorrow.  I have already made quite a few of the recipes in the book but I will chalk that up to practice.  At any rate, I have the soaker for Anadama bread sitting on the counter top now, another post to follow.


 


Happy Baking,


-Matthew 



White Sandwich loaf before pre-shape


Sandwich loaves final proofing


White sandwich loaves final proof



Finished sandwich loaves



Crumb Shot


C


Mixture of the day's bake



Crumb shot of cranberry wild rice bread

knit fast die warm's picture

ww soft sandwich loaf, please help

September 23, 2010 - 2:12pm -- knit fast die warm
Forums: 

i've been making a few different recipes for ww sandwich loaves. i'm not happy with the results.


i'm looking for something similar to the softness of a store-bought loaf. i've never done a sourdough starter, so i'd rather the suggestions be with yeast.


i have ww flour, ap flour, gluten, dry active yeast, white sugar, brown/natural sugar, raw honey, milk, kefir.


i'd also LOVE to be able to add other goodies like oats, nuts, wheat germ, flax meal, and such.

Doc Tracy's picture

King Authur's 100% Whole Wheat Sandwich loaf

December 18, 2009 - 11:55pm -- Doc Tracy
Forums: 

Has anyone made this recipe? I'm making it right now and it's the nicest dough I've ever worked with. However, I'm not sure if it's the Phoenix dry air or the recipe but I had to add an extra 1 cup of water, despite using 1/2 cup milk instead of the dry milk and only the minimum 3 cups flour. Using the Whole Wheat white which I've never worked with and absolutely love.

Salome's picture
Salome

I liked the Buttermilk-Whole-Wheat-Bread which I baked just a couple days ago so much that I decided to continue with 100% whole wheat. The Buttermilk-Whole-Wheat-Bread was very soft and light, I have never seen a whole-wheat bread like this.


I adapted the recipe I used the last time. It was, for my taste, somewhat to sweet and it lacked a real crust. And I decided to substitute the buttermilk by a yoghurt-water-blend, because that's what I always got on hand here. (Whereas plain buttermilk is often hard to get.) And I increased the hydration by a lot. And I used this time a preferment, with sourdough - In order to get a deeper, less sweet flavor.


A lot of changes, you see. I wasn't to worried that anything could go wrong, because I think the reason why this bread came out so light is, first of all, proper kneading, and secondly, some acidic dairy products.


Yoghurt-Whole-Wheat-Bread


Preferment:
20 g mature culture
175 ml water
250 g whole-wheat flour (I always use home-ground flour)


Final dough
580 g whole-wheat flour
25 g vital wheat gluten
17 g salt
1 teaspoon dry yeast
20 g honey
30 g butter
150 g yoghurt (I used 3% fat yoghurt)
320 + 100 ml water


 



  1. I mixed the ingredients of the preferment and kept it over night in a warm place (I put it into the microwave, with the door a little bit open - this way, the light stays on and I get a temperature of ~81° F)

  2. The next morning, I let the remaining flour autolyse for an hour. (I mixed the flour with the gluten first, then with all of the yoghurt and 320 ml water.)

  3. Then I mixed the preferment and the flour-water-dough with the remaining ingredients (not the last 100 ml water though) and I kneaded it by hand using the Bertinet method for 15 minutes. While kneading, I incorporated another 100 ml of water. The gluten was perfectly developed, even better than the last time.

  4. first fermentation: until doubled, it took me about two hours. Then I degassed the dough very well and shaped it into a boule again.

  5. second fermentation: until doubled, it took me about 1.5 hours.

  6. I divided the dough into two pieces, preshaped them and let them rest for a couple minutes. then shaped them into sandwich loaves, rolled them in rice flour (I use whatever I've got on hand . . . coarse wheat, bran, oats . . .) and put them into bread pans.

  7. final fermentation: until the loaves reached well over the edges of the pans, about one hour.

  8. I slashed the loaves and put them in the 220° C hot oven and steamed well. After 20 minutes of baking, I took them out of the pans and baked them until done on a baking sheet. (another 20 minutes.) I covered the loaves with aluminium foil for the last ten minutes.



I think the bread had about as much volume as the last time, I'm very pleased with that. It has quite a sour flavor. It's definitely a good flavor, but for my taste it's somewhat to sour for being a sandwich bread. I will change something about that. The bread did well with the higher heat and I think that I'll bake this kind of recipe in these settings in the future. It still didn't have a crunchy crust, but that's not what I'm looking for in a sandwich bread either. I will reduce the amount of water somewhat, because it simply was harder to shape with a hydration of 86 % and the result wasn't significantly better. Maybe something around 75-80% the next time? I'm happy with the reduction of sugar though!


I think, the next time I'll bake this bread with a yeast preferment and simply add a little of sourdough to the final dough. Or should I include some whole rye for a deeper flavour? I'd like to experiment with some further additions to the dough, like soaked wheat chops or some seeds (incorporated in the dough when the gluten is developed). I'll do some more experiments, I promise!


Salome

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