The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Salt

  • Pin It
danielsuh25's picture

Need advice on bread recipes aand ratio of ingredients

April 1, 2013 - 7:12pm -- danielsuh25
Forums: 

So I've done some research online trying to find a good ratio for flour, water/milk, yeast, and sugar. Basically what I found was that the flour:water/milk and sugar:yeast ratio should be 3:1. So I'm theorizing, after looking at many recipes online, that a good recipe for 1 9x5 inch loaf bread should be about 3 cups of flour, 1 cup of water/milk, 2 1/4 teaspoons of yeast, and 6 3/4 teaspoons of sugar. I'm also wondering how much salt and oil would be good for this recipe? Any suggestions and words of advice would be very much appreciated. Thank you!

myuj's picture

too much salt in sourdough..what should I do?

May 28, 2012 - 3:53am -- myuj

I accidently added 3 times more salt (by volume) to the final dough than the orginal recipe proportions (russian rye bread from bread matters) . Will the extra salt kill all the bacteria? Should I proof the dough for a much longer period of time? Or should I add more flour and water to compensate?  I put the dough in a pan nearly two hours ago.

Truth Serum's picture
Truth Serum

I am wondering if any folks on this site, have some tried and true low sodium around 100 -150 milligrams per serving recipes for bread that they liked to share.

timpel_800's picture

Adding salt in second speed

October 14, 2011 - 3:42am -- timpel_800
Forums: 

Hi ya'll

I’ve got a question about salt. I once worked at a baker where we added 1/4 of the salt at the beginning of mixing, and the other 3/4 at the moment the mixer would go to second speed.

We used the intensive mixing methode and used a strong patent flour. After a three hour fermentation, the dough was divided and shaped (by hand), then, after a short final fermentation, baked. 

TimmyB's picture
TimmyB

 

Flour Salt and Water are all that we need to make great bread.  So I am on the search for the best flour/salt/water for a new baking adventure/venture.

PART 1 - Salt

JohnD on sourdough.com wrote an interesting article regarding the varying qualities of salt.  The conclusion is the minerality of sea salt was superior to river or rock salt.  In my travels I have been looking for an affordable high quality salt and I am pleased to say I have found it.

 

My preference was to find a locally produced salt but the reality is salts in Victoria, Australia just don’t have the quality I was looking for.  So I broadened my outlook to include fair trade salt.  Salt that I could purchase directly from the farmer. (I figure that I can off set any resulting carbon footprint with tree planting which is already planned to compensate for the use of a wood fired oven).

 

Whilst on holidays on the east coast of Bali I ordered a bowl of chips and they where the best chips I have ever eaten. Not because of they were well cook, in fact the preparation was less than pleasing, oily and under cooked, but because they where covered in the most extraordinary salt.  When I enquired further I was thrilled to discover that the salt was produced only a short walk from where I was staying.

 

Amed Sea Salt is produced on small salt farms that have been producing salt the same way for generations.  At one time, several generations ago, the farms could be found scattered up and down the coast but now there are only a few left.  The salt is sold almost exclusively to locals although some restaurants are now using it.

 

The traditional process remains unchanged with perhaps the only amendment being plastic/hesion bags are used to line the clay filters

 

Step 1)Harrow the clay/soil pans and fill with sea water

Step 2)Smooth the salt and soil mixture to enable even drying

Step 3)Rake the dried salt and soil to break it up

Step 4)Put broken soil into the filter cones, lining the sides.  The cones are a lot like giant coffee filters

Step 5)Collect more sea water and fill the cone

Step 6)The sea water then filters through the salty soil

Step 7)Collect the filtered salty water and place into wooden containers to evaporate and reveal the salt.  (the wooded containers are palm trunks that have been cut in half and carved out)

In this photo the salty water is only one day old

After 3 days the salt is visible and crystalising

Step 8)After 4 days of drying the salt is ready for collection in large 5kg baskets

 

The salt is a wonderful color, slightly grey and so so tasty.  The local restaurants don’t use any stocks and very little additional flavoring as the salt seems to do it all.

 

I am looking forward to seeing how this amazing salt complements my bread.

johannesenbergur's picture
johannesenbergur

Ingredients:

  • 1 dl (100g) lukewarm to warm water
  • ½ dl (50g) plain naturel yogurt
  • 15g fresh active yeast
  • 8 g honey
    (pref. liquid)
  • 10 g sea salt
  • 10 g olive oil
    (this is a minimum, feel free to use more, I reckon 25g would be ideal)
  • 250g various types of flour, I used and recommend:
    30g Graham flour
    70g semolina flour
    150g wheat baking flour
  • Poppy or sesame seeds or for sprinkle

This recipe is very small, the smallest I've ever made. Usually I double the ingredients mentioned, except for the yeast, the dough rises just fine with 15g.

Recipe:

(Work: 20 mins - 1st rise: 30 mins - work: 5 mins - 2nd rise: 35 mins - bake: 30 mins)
Estimated time from start to finish: 2 hours 

Mix the warm water and yogurt, so you get a tepid mixture. Add the yeast and stir till dissolved. Add salt and honey and dissolve. Add the flour to the mixture, I ususally add 100g, mix and add then add more.

Knead the dough for approximately 10 minutes, put it into an oiled container, cover it with a hot teatowel and leave it to rise for 30 mins or so, can be more or less, usually more means better and less means less good.

Should be doubled after half an hour and shape it into a loaf. Place the loaf onto your baking surface of choice. Pat the bread with milk and sprinkle the seeds on top of it. Cover it again with a warm towel and let it rise for 30-60 minutes; Afterwards put the loaf into your oven.

Bake for approximately 30 minutes, until the crust is golden and it makes that hollow sound you know so well, when you knock on the bottom of it.

Enjoy.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Salt