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kadde's picture

Ingredients of a very dark/black recipe anyone?

July 29, 2009 - 2:59pm -- kadde
Forums: 

Hi all,


 


I'm really keen on knowing which ingredient is responsible for the very dark almost black color of some breads. When I make bread, regardless of the recipe at most it's grey. Sometimes a little darker, but never deeply brown/black.


I read that dark sugar might be used or roasted malt. Yet, I can't exactly pinpoint the cause of the deep dark color. So anyone any ideas on which ingredients might darken the bread?


 


Cheers

MommaT's picture

Bagels - tried BBA recipe and have questions

July 19, 2009 - 12:53pm -- MommaT

Hello,


Having had a very successful experience with boiled pretzels, I was convinced bagels were a walk in the park.  The recipe in BBA seemed approachable enough -- doesn't take too long, doesn't require lye (I know...point of contention) and is ready to bake for breakfast.  I had a mediocre experience, however, and am looking for pointers from those of you who have had great success making "true" bagels.

cookingwithdenay's picture
cookingwithdenay


Have you ever developed an original recipe? Most people think it is some long drawn out process, but remember you are not Pillsbury test kitchen with thousands of dollars and test kitchen cooks to address ever question or issue.


When you find a recipe that is good, reliable and consistent...that's a keeper. If it is not, you have a couple of choices. Rework the recipe, refine it so it works, put it in the "to-do" pile for a later date or toss it. What you do depends on how much time you want to devote to recipe and only you can answer that question.


As you test, and retest, you will find a pattern to the process and it will fall into an everyday groove. I would suggest that you schedule time each month to test or at least review the recipes you are working on. Remember it's not just about recipes, this is a listing of products you can enter into contest, feature in a magazine or newspaper, include in a future cookbook or sell in your home-based bakery. When your bakery is up and running and a local journalist ask...may we have a recipe to attach to your story? What will you say, no they are all secret...


Always have a dozen or so recipes that are uniquely yours that you don't mind sharing...just in case.


You may also want to place a recipe in your marketing materials...not that people will prepare them necessarily, but to show you are open to sharing your knowledge and skill. You are a great baker and this is not the time to be shy!


Now with that said, you don't have to give out your best recipes, just things you don't mind sharing. Give it some thought.


There is an old saying, there is nothing new under the sun, and it is so true. It is easy to add a new twist to something, but food companies spend millions to create new products, it's a real challenge; but every once and a while an independent culinary innovator comes up with a unique and inspiring food, spice or taste. Take a look at what is missing out there on the grocery shelves... get creative. I would love to see an alternative to buttercream frosting, but I have not yet figured out what it should be, something sweet, creamy and not made with all that fat.


 

Stephanie Brim's picture
Stephanie Brim

I was inspired by David (dmsnyder) and his 5 hour baguettes. I needed a sandwich bread that was as lean as I could get it but was still very much soft crusted and soft of crumb. I've found it, I think, by slightly modifying the 5 hour baguette idea and adding one enrichment: olive oil.



Stephanie’s Simple Bread
Makes 1 small loaf


225g AP or bread flour
10g rye flour
15g white whole wheat flour
3/4 teaspoon instant yeast
1 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon olive oil
170g water


Mix ingredients in the bowl for your stand mixer until you form a shaggy mass. Mix, on low, for 5 minutes, then increase speed to medium for 3 or 4 more. I left this in a clean bowl for 75 minutes for a first rise, folding at 25 and 50 minutes, and 60 minutes for a second rise. Shaped carefully and proofed for 40 minutes, scored, and spritzed with water. Baked for 30 minutes at 425 degrees.


I posted the recipe on my blog, too.


So thank you David. Thanks also have to go out to Susan of Wild Yeast for inspiration due to the fact that I was browsing the Wild Yeast Blog when I thought about how good a simple bread would be with the locally homemade ham salad I bought today.

NepaBill's picture

porketta recipe

June 2, 2009 - 7:47am -- NepaBill
Forums: 

Does anyone have an authentic recipe for Porketta?  All my online searches seem to yield the same two recipes (posted below). Any input would be of great value.  I will probably take the best of both recipes and combine, unless anyone can point me in the right direction.


 


most common recipe found all over the web:

Stephanie Brim's picture
Stephanie Brim

Baked Potato Bread Photo


There'll be a better write-up on my blog,
mentalexperimental.org, but I wanted to thank Floyd for a good starter recipe. I'm still working on modifying this one. I think that I have the general consistency of the bread down that I want, but I want a bit more tang. I think that there may have to be a sourdough component to really get it where I want it to be. But that's a completely new bread.


This is Floyd's recipe with a few modifications. The first is adding a bit more sour cream. The second was adding cheddar cheese instead of chives. The third is the addition of half & half in the dough and the mashed potatoes.


I think that getting a stand mixer will help me with this type of bread the most. I mixed for 8 or so minutes on speed 2 and then folded twice during the bulk fermentation, giving it an hour at the end to come to full bulk. The crumb is light, fluffy, and very tender.


I'm writing the recipe on the blog now. I wanted to share the photo because I'm so proud of how this one turned out. :)

MommaT's picture

loving Hamelman's pain au levain with whole wheat!

April 29, 2009 - 7:10am -- MommaT

Hi,


Having been on the great quest for that perfect daily bread for my family, I think I'm getting closer.


I've been baking Hamelman's Pain au Levain now and again with mixed reviews from the family.  I recently tried the pain au levain with whole wheat and it has been a massive hit!  The flours here are split between 75% bread flour, 20% whole wheat flour and 5% medium rye.     My starter seems to really love the warmer weather of spring and this dough bursts to life.  I wish I had photos to show you!

thebreadfairy's picture

Onion-Poppy Seed Recipe request

March 12, 2009 - 10:58am -- thebreadfairy

 

Yesterday, on the "Crispier Crust" thread, Eric posted a picture of Susan from SD's latest Onion-Poppy seed bread which looked absolutely gorgeous. I have searched for the recipe but cannot find it. Does anyone have that recipe? Susan? Eric?

Thanks for any help. I would love to be able to give it a try.

Jessica

 

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