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Pullman loaf

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Kashipan's picture

Pullman Loaf in a Temperature Challenged Oven

October 14, 2012 - 5:45pm -- Kashipan
Forums: 

Hello all!  I haven't been here in ages, but I've got another Pullman loaf question or two for you.

I live in Japan where most of the ovens for the home are electric and tiny.  Not only that, but my particular oven is temperature challenged for some reason, so at the higher temps, it goes up to 210C and then jumps to 250C.  There's no in-between.  >_<  I've checked the manual, and there does not seem to be a way around this, and we can't afford an expensive new oven right now, so I have to learn to live with it.

jefklak's picture
jefklak

You can read the whole story and see more pictures at:

http://www.savesourdough.com/70-rye-with-soaker/

It's the first time I've tried to bake a "full" wholegrain bread using more than half (whole)rye. I've basically followed the recipe from Mr. Hamelman's excellent BREAD book but was unable to find any chopped rye of rye grains in my area. I bought rye flakes instead. The problem with that is the equal amount water/flakes does not completely match (flakes are bigger and not completely submerged into the hot water). 

The sourdough and soaker was prepared and left at the kitchen table for 15 hours. 
I think I didn't let it proof long enough (1 hour at 30°C, trying to maintain that temperature in the microwave with some preheating). It did rise a bit in the pullman tin but not much. The result is an extremely dense bread (sliced after 24 hours being wrapped in a towel) - a thin slice weighs 40gr! 

I'd love some feedback from all experts as I think a lot of things could be better. The dough was very dense and sticky (as it should be, I think) but others who baked using this recipe found it to be more like a batter and they "poured" it into the pan. I could shape it into a brick but that's it, and threw it in there. 

 

There are tiny holes in the bread and the smell and taste is great, tangy and sour just like I love it. I used a stiff rye starter (which I created 1.5weeks before baking, based on my 3 month old 100% hydratation white wheat starter. I know it's not the same thing as creating a rye starter from scratch but hey does it matter that much?)

Thanks for reading!

ph_kosel's picture
ph_kosel

I recently bought a 9"x4"x4" pullman pan and a pound of SAF instant yeast from Amazon.  Other stuff kept me busy for a few days and I didn't get a chance to try em out, but then I (shudder) ran out of bread. Only one thing to do do when that happens!


I washed out the new pan, lubed the lid a bit with a spritz of olive oil (after which it was much less inclined to stick), and whomped up some dough as follows:


400g unbleached bread flour


100g dark rye flour


1 Tablespoon SAF "red" instant yeast


1 Tablespon brown sugar


1.5 teaspoon salt


1.5 teaspoon dill seed


1.5 teaspoon caraway seed


333g very warm water


I put all the dry ingredients in the bowl of the Kitchenaid mixer, added the water, and mixed it up.  I let it sit a minute or so to hydrate, mixed it a bit more, then made a nice warm log out of it, plopped it in the pan, put the lid on and a towel folded up on top of that to keep the heat in, and left while I watched an hour of television with my wife.


I checked the pan after the tv program and was surprised to discover the dough had risen to fill the pan!  Admittedly I doubled up on the yeast to get a fast rise, but I was mucho impressed - the active dry yeast I've been using previously just doesn't rise like that no matter how much I goose it.


Anyway, I quick preheated the oven to 450F, popped the pan in, and set the timer for 25 minutes.  When the timer went off I pulled the pan out, took the lid off and popped the loaf out of the pan with no problem (even though I only oiled the lid, not the rest of the pan).


 



loaf and pan^



crumb shot^


For a first try at a pullman loaf I'm happy as a clam with the way it looks!  Tastes good too!


 


 

cubfan4ever's picture
cubfan4ever

I just sliced into my first Pullman Loaf.  I was given a Pullman loaf pan as a gift and simply followed the recipe on the packaging.  It came from Williams-Sonoma.  Needless to say, I am thrilled. The slices are light, yet toothsome and has a mellow flavor, but addictiing.  I admit, it was a little challenging to knead the butter into the dough, so I cheated and used the stand mixer.  Here are two snapshots.




If anyone wants the recipe, I will add it.  I rarely post here, but am constantly lurking and learning!  Thanks!

evth's picture
evth

paindemie


Ode to pain de mie




Won't wear anyone down with a poem here, but I will extol the virtues of just simple, pure white bread.  True, that this is a distant cry from any of the many handsome, crusty artisanal loaves of TFL.  There's nothing ordinary about this square and honest loaf.  What does it yield? A tender, buttery, soft crumb.  This is serious comfort food.


The mark of a civilized society may be said to have the crusts cut off.  Not here.  As thin as the crusts are, there is no need for trimming in the company I keep.  Great for sandwiches (think grilled cheese) and just as great with a nice spread of butter.


This bread is also known as a pullman loaf and was inspired by thepauperedchef.com where the recipe can be found:


http://thepauperedchef.com/2009/08/part-one-of-my-cucumber-sandwich-revenge-pan-de-mie.html


Pip pip or better yet, au revoir,


evth


Next post: the quiche crust that won't quit!

 

davidg618's picture
davidg618

We enjoy sandwich breads--soft crust, close crumb--a buttermilk white straight dough, the dough for three loaves made in our bread machine and oven baked,  or a whole wheat variation has been our mainstay for six or seven years. My favorite is the whole wheat version. Recently, I've made a sourdough variation a couple of times, with enjoyable results. It was natural I'd turn to this favorite for my first go at making pain de mie--Pullman bread. This is a poolish started version. The final dough contains 25% whole wheat, and is firm (60% hydration). As expected, the crumb is close and soft, and the crust slight. The bread has a sweeter flavor than the straight dough version. I suspect this come from the poolish which makes up 25% of the final dough weight.


I think I overfilled the bread-pan slightly. There is a slight compression of the crumb just inside the crust (although that could also be due the way I fit the dough log into the pan). Jeffery Hamelman, in Bread, recommends 2.25 lbs. of dough for a 13"x4"x4" Pullman bread pan. My dough weighed four ounces more. Next time I'll follow his guidance to the fraction of an ounce.




the crumb.


On the last day of class at King Arthur we baked Fougasse and pizza in the center's magnificent Le Panyol wood-fired oven. Here's a picture of our classes' youngest member, Michael who attended with his mother, loading his pizza into the oven, and another of my Fougasse. At 650°F it only takes a few minutes to bake, and because the fire was still burning in the rear of the oven we had to keep turning our breads frequently. It was fun, but it also made me appreciate my home's modern convection oven.




This bread was delicious when eaten immediately warm, but the next day it was rock hard, good for croutons or bread crumbs, but not much more.

Kuret's picture
Kuret

It is my girlfriends birthday today so I decided to make her a special breakfast! I had eyeballed the butter scones from Advanced Bread and Pastries before but seeing as how they are so rich I didn't want to make them save for a special occasion. Here in sweden a scone is more akin to Soda Bread than the sweetish style scones you get in Britain och America.


I managed to make them up the day before without my girlfriend noticing and refrigerate them overnight so that I could bake them for here first thing in the morning. I think they turned out pretty good, and my girlfriend did like them so I'm set!


Butter scones


 


I have also finally taken the plunge and aquired a Pullman pan for myself, maybe a 1.5kg loaf of tasty toast bread is too much for a two person family but maybe a 2.5kg loaf of Vollkornbrot might not be enoguh? hmm.. might have to share any attempts at Vollkornbrot with friends or there will be leftovers for ever! Here the pullman pan Is shown beside my regular breadpan.



and here is how a loaf of sourdough sandwich bread turned out, tasty! This is the same bread I have blogged about earlier, with a formula developed by me. Unfortunately the picture is insanely yellow, but that is due to poor lighting when I took the picture.



This is a secret too, but I have also made two mini cheesecakes for tonights dinner wich I am making for my girlfriend, hope that they are tasty..



 

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