The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Proofing

  • Pin It
diverpro94's picture
diverpro94

I was researching deck ovens at Empire Bakery Equipment, but I found some DIRT CHEAP plastic proofing baskets. Yeah, they're not reed baskets, but they'll due. I thought I would pass it along! :o)


 


http://www.empirebake.com/shop/pc/Baskets-c2.htm

Moris's picture
Moris

Hi Everyone,  Thanks for stopping by !


You may be one of the lucky ones to have recently baked some of my fresh hand made croissants from Frozen.


I've created this blog as an extra resource for you to ensure that your croissants are the flakiest, tastiest & lightest croissants that you've ever had !


Let's get started shall we ?  :)


Step 1:  Remove your frozen croissants from the freezer bag and place on a baking sheet.  Chocolate ones should be placed seam side down.


Frozen Croissants


 Step 2:  Let them raise overnight or for approx 9-10 hours.


For best results, they should be in a slightly warmer than room temp place (75F - 80F)


A trick to achieve this warm & humid atmosphere that will allow the yeast to really work is to add a tin pan at the bottom of your oven and pour some boiling water in it when you first start the rising process.  This added steam & heat will really assist in ensuring best results possible.



Here's an action shot.  Special Thanks to Katie for being a wonderful arm model.  Please Contact us for future bookings :)


 


 


 After 9-10 Hours the croissants should be fully proofed and be double to triple in size and slightly jiggly if you wiggle the pan. 


Proofed Croissants


 


 


These ones actually proofed for 10 hours.  If yours don't look like this, you can try some things to set the mood for the yeast to really start working.


Tip 1:  Give them another steam bath & Let them sit for another hour


Tip 2:  Give them a little blast of heat.  Set your oven for only 200F and let it heat up for one minute (it won't actually get to 200F) for a quick shot of heat.  The point here is just to warm the surrounding air up a little bit and not make it too warm where the butter starts to melt out. 


After this heat blast - Sit back for a while and let the yeast do its thing ;)





Step 4:  Preheat your oven to 400F if using convection or 425F if not convection


Step 5:  Prior to baking brush with egg wash.  This will ensure a nice golden colour.


Egg Wash


 


It really comes down to personal preference here.  If you have no eggs, milk or cream is fine.  No milk ?  Use water, or even nothing at all.


 


My personal favorite is to use just the egg yolk with a little bit of water.  This will make a nice dark & crispy coating - egg yolk is always the prettiest in my opinion.


 


 Tip:  At this point while your oven is heating, you can refridgerate the croissants.  What this does is set the butter even more.  This will ensure optimum flakiness ;~)


Step 6:  Bake for 20 minutes or until you have a deep golden brown.  Don't be afraid to go too dark here.. the darker the better and it sets them nicely. 


Baked


 


These ones baked the full 20 minutes.


 


 


 


 


 


Close upLet Them rest on the pan for about 5 minutes.  The extra time lets the steam from the butter do its final setting.


Best served warm !


ENJOY !!!!


 


Cheers,


Moris.

Boboshempy's picture

Best Overnight Proofing Temperature

February 14, 2011 - 7:36am -- Boboshempy

I am able to control the temperature of my sourdough loaves for overnight retarding and proofing and I wanted to get everyone's opinion of what you think the best temperature is and why. There has been a bunch of recent thoughts and discussion on this circulating in books and whatnot and I wanted to put this question out there to the masters.


Thanks!


Nick


 

varda's picture
varda


 


I'm a simple person and I'm driven by simple hopes and desires.   So while I may drool over the pictures of impossibly gorgeous pastries that get posted with alarming regularity on this site, I have no inclination to emulate those bakers.   All I want is to master bread with essentially three ingredients:   flour, water, and salt.   And that's not so simple.  For the last several weeks I've been cranking out alarming quantities of the stuff and slowly tweaking the few parameters available when the ingredient list is so short: dough hydration, starter hydration, and percentage of flour in the starter.    (Oh and also mix of flour and proofing strategies.)    I finally put together a decent spreadsheet to help me with this tinkering.    And now I can just put in the hydrations, and percentage starter (and flour mix of course) and I'm off to the races.    While I started down this road with Hamelman's formulae, I find I'm unwilling to go back to that right now, as I find I prefer higher hydrations and starter percentages.  


The first loaf baked after 1.5 hours final proof.   The second which retarded overnight, had a bit more spring. 



Basic Sourdough bread baked on Jan 17, 18, 2011      
           
Starter 67% starter first feeding second feeding total  
starter seed 245   plus 3.5 hrs plus 12 hrs  
Heckers 138 50 45 233 94%
Hodgson's Mill Rye 2   5 7 3%
spelt 7     7 3%
water 98 35 32 165  
hydration       67%  
total grams       412  
           
  Final dough   Starter   percents
Bob's Red Mill White 500         Heckers 124    
Hodgson's Mill Rye 30                HM 3.7    
KA White whole wheat 70              spelt 3.7    
water 439   88   72%
total starter / flour in starter 219   132    
salt 13       1.8%
hydration of starter         67%
baker's % of starter         18%
Estimated pounds of bread     2.53    
           
Mix flour and water plus 30 minutes      
Mix salt and starter plus 50 minutes      
Stretch and fold plus 35 minutes      
Stretch and fold plus 65 minutes      
Cut and preshape plus 30 minutes      
Shape and place seam side up in brotforms.  Cover with plastic   Heat cup of water for 2 minutes in microwave.   Place one in microwave, other in back of refrigerator wrapped in a towel plus 45 minutes      
Turn oven to 500 w. stone plus 15 minutes      
Remove basket from microwave and place next to stove - put loaf pans plus towels in oven plus 30 minutes      
Turn heat down to 450 slash and place loaf in oven plus 15 minutes      
Remove steam pans plus 15 minutes      
Place loaf on rack          
After 19 hours remove second loaf from refrigerator, and preheat oven, stone, towels and bake as above.          

Second loaf: 

Slices from first loaf:

 

a1usteuton's picture
a1usteuton

I have attempted making sourdough bread three times in the last week and a half.  The first time, the starter failed, due to tap water and temperature.  The latter starters I have made I used both rye flour and un-bleached AP flour separately.  They rose and responded like gang busters!  I fed them and they grew very well.  Three times I have mixed the pre ferment and it did poorly the first time ( I think from temperature).  The second time, I got through the pre ferment and tried to raise the total mixed dough.  It sat in a warm spot for 10 hours and did nothing and I set it on a pan of warm water and it took off, but then wouldn't get the second proof or rise.  The third time, Everything went well until the final proof and I am still waiting on the rise and to avoid cooking the dough, I am setting it on a thermostatically controlled heating pad.  What am I doing wrong??? 

Tom Kershaw's picture

Sourdough pasta proofing

November 14, 2010 - 4:35am -- Tom Kershaw

Hello,


 


I have a sourdough pasta dough made about 24 hours ago and stored in the fridge since. The dough which I improvised from a couple of online sources looks convincing but I'm unsure as to what proofing schedule I should follow.


Formula:


400g strong Canadian white bread flour


100g 125% sourdough starter


1/4 cup olive oil


8 egg yolks.


 


Any advice?


 


Tom

mlucas's picture

Brotform pattern without a brotform!

June 18, 2010 - 1:02pm -- mlucas

I've always been a little sad that because I use a linen tea towel to line my baskets, very little (if any) of the pattern of the basket shows through in the flour on the finished loaf. (I do have one small round basket that looks very natural / foodsafe, so I have tried that one without a towel, with good results. But my other baskets kind of look like the wicker may be chemically treated, so I didn't want to try them.)

fractious's picture

newbie question

June 11, 2010 - 9:58pm -- fractious

a newbie question: for sourdoughs, we do (at least) a bulk fermentation followed by shaping and proofing. what is the purpose of the proofing period? is it to


1) allow bubbles to get larger (for a more aerated dough going into the oven)


2) increase the yeast population (for more oven spring when the dough finally gets in the oven)


3) some other reason?

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Proofing