The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

poolish

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rpt's picture

Sponge versus Straight Dough

October 8, 2012 - 5:01am -- rpt
Forums: 

I've often wondered what difference using a sponge has compared to making a straight dough with long fermentation. There have been various discussions here but I've never seen a definitive answer. So I decided to try my own experiment by baking two loaves with identical recipes.

The first loaf was mixed and kneaded on Thursday night at 10pm with all the ingredients. It was then left in the fridge until 3.30pm Friday, shaped and placed in the tin at 7pm and finally baked at 8.30pm.

shames's picture

Newbie poolish question

August 3, 2012 - 10:06pm -- shames

Hello everyone I'm a newbie like literally my first time attempting baking bread and I'm trying to make baguettes.

I see most recipes call for a poolish of equal amounts water to flour and a bit of yeast.  When I combine the ingredients it often turns into a loose dough rather then the thick batter that the pictures often suggest it should look like.  It has been pretty humid where I'm from the last few days so could this change things?  Should I just add more water to make it look like the picture and alter the water amount for the dough portion?

baybakin's picture
baybakin

Living in San Diego for school, I gained a love for the little rolls brought from the local panaderia down the street.  Like little mini batards, pulled from the oven and placed in bins alongside racks of pan dulces.  Alas, here in the oakland hills the closest panaderia is a 15-20 minute drive away, and the bolillos just aren't quite like the ones I used to get in San Diego.

Most of the recipies I've seen are straight-dough, and being that I can't leave well enough alone, I have developed the following recipe, based off of the Poolish Baguettes in Hamelman's Bread.  The percentages of fat and sugar are from a bakery near mexico city (I don't remember quite where).

Poolish:
166g Flour
166g Water
Pinch of yeast (less than 1/8 tsp)

Let poolish sit overnight or at least 8 hours, untill poolish begins to pucker in the middle.

Final Dough:
All of the Poolish
334g Flour
164g Water
15g Fat (Lard or shortning)
10g Salt
10g Sugar (unrefined cane or honey)
2g instant yeast

Mix everything but the salt together into a shaggy mass.  Let autolysis for at least 20 mins.  Add salt and kneed dough untill it passes a windowpane test.  Let rise until doubled.  Divide into 6-8 pieces, preshape into rounds and let bench rest for 10 mins.  Shape into ovals and place into a floured couche like you would for baguettes.  Preheat oven to 500F at least 45 minutes before baking.  Slash bolillos once lengthwise and place into oven. Bake for 5 mins with steam at 500F then turn down oven to 450F for 10 mins (or untill a dark hazlenut color is achieved).  Remove breads and let cool (if you can).  Enjoy with some avocado, pickled jalapenos, ham, and farmers cheese, or just with some butter.

 

Bread behind is some oakland sourdough, made with Central Milling's type 70 high extraction flour.

 

Leandro Di Lorenzo's picture
Leandro Di Lorenzo

Hey, I don't post as much as i should here, but I'm excited about the new way of steaming, at least for me, that I used today!

First, I'm from Brazil, so sorry for some misspell or something :)

I was looking for a better way to create steam for bread baking, than I came up with a photo (on thefreshloaf) of a pressure cooker connect to the oven (eletric) by a tube, I didn't even know that a eletric oven has a tube on top by the stove, and then I said to myself " what the heck, let me try this!"

I decided to bake a regular poolish dough.

Total flour: 400g

Pre fermented flour: 150g + 150g of H2O

I started with 65% hydration, but I had to add a bit more H2O maybe 68 or 69% total, got a really old flour (KAAP)

2% Salt

A bit of yeast

Only thing I did different. I mixed The poolish flour H2O, yeast and a bit more malt than normal and let it rest for maybe 2.5 hours, I went to the gym rsrs.

After this period, added the salt and a tiny amount of ascorbic acid. I can only bake batards on my oven, so I can use a little more strength.

Then kneaded just enough, let it ferment for 1:30 min with a turn (45 min), divided, pre shaped shaped proof and bake. ufff!!!

But I'm getting out of track... Wanna talk about the steam!!! Hahaha

The bakeing took 27 min. total

Here is a photo of my new steaming method

I steamed the oven before, don't know why cos when I opened the oven door all the steam came out lol, and after loading.

And for 15 sec in one minute intervals for 10 min.

After that let it bake for more 10 min, turn the bread and more 7 min in the oven, maybe a bit much, it burned the bottom :(

I loved the results!!!

Check it out!! Some pics...

 

  

  

I think is the first time than I bake with steam instead of vapor. I mean, I tried before with hot water, but I don't know if is the same, cos here I'm using the steamer.

I tried to show some cracks on the crust, I don't know if you can see it on the pics.

I think is worth trying, I will again tomorrow, with a bit of rye on the poolish ;) ....

So that's it!!! Hope you like it!!! Happy baking!!!! =)

BTW One last photo...

That's the layout inside my oven!!!

Regards,

Leandro Di Lorenzo

 

 

 

javajavabug's picture

Biga to Dough Ratio

April 17, 2012 - 7:20am -- javajavabug

I was wondering, is there was a perfect biga to dough ratio?

I made an Italian bread, not ciabatta, and I felt like there might have been too much biga in it. In the recipe I used, the biga weighed 17 ounces, a little over half of the weight of the entire bread. The bread was overly chewy and a bit tough. I don't think I over kneaded it either. 

Is there a rule of thumb I should follow when making a bread with a biga?

Thanks so much! 

mayagayam's picture

Hi and Thank You!! Share celebration with me?

February 21, 2012 - 10:03pm -- mayagayam

Hi from Fairfax, VA.  My name's Maya, and up until a week ago I've never even *thought* about baking bread.Then, thanks to this site, I was able to make my first baguettes ever today, by hand, with no bread maker, from scratch - actual picture below - I can't believe it.  I created a combined recipe using Fromartz, Reinhard and others to make a 68% hydration dough using a 100% hydration poolish that I made last night, and I'm totally jazzed at what I got out of my baguettes today.

arguros's picture

Baguette dough, final bread texture

February 4, 2012 - 2:06am -- arguros

Hi,

This is my first post in this forum. I have been following it silently for quite a while and I was impressed with the quality of bread other forum members post here. I also recently bough a Kenwood Major KM020 and I wanted to try it out with a baguette dough.

While I have been living in Dublin for more than 10 years, I am originally from Italy, where there is a long artisan bread tradition, which means I am kind of found of good bread.

I followed the Hamelmann baguette with poolish recipe , with a final round shape

Emerald's picture

Poolish

January 28, 2012 - 6:18am -- Emerald

I am a beginner....! Thursday night I made a poolish so I could bake my first bread on Friday, leaving it out overnight. It turns out I cannot bake the bread until today (Saturday)...so I put the poolish in the refrigerator. It doesn't look the same anymore and is watery underneath the surface. Should I start over again, or can this be used. Sorry for the novice request! But I have my my shirtsleeves rolled up and ready to rock!

smoke signals's picture
smoke signals

Earlier this week I had a dream about ham & cheese on baguette. Since this was a dream that I could turn into reality, I took up the task of making some baguettes. So many dreams just stay dreams, when you have one within reach: grab it.

I turned to Jeffery Hamelman’s book, Bread, and to an old bakery formula I had from years ago working as a baguette mixer at Red Hen. Pretty strait forward, poolish recipe. But how awesome simple formulas can be! To my delight these baguettes crackled, and tasted like butter and nuts and wheat. It was hard to bake them long enough because I kept wanting to pull them out of and eat them in one, huge bite. 

Dear Baguette,

I am sorry we were apart for so long. I took you for granted. One day you just weren’t there anymore. Maybe the separation did us both some good. I’ve moved a couple of times, have a new boyfriend, in general, things are progressing. But maybe we could think about spending some time together again. I really love the way you smell.

Yours Truly, Smoke Signals  

   

    

    

    

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