The Fresh Loaf

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404's picture

BBQ/Grilled bread

October 24, 2008 - 4:21am -- 404
Forums: 

Are there any types of bread you can cook directly on a grill/bbq without using the BBQ as an oven. I figure there must be types of bread in some cultures that have some nomadic roots that do this as who is going to lug about an oven.

I don't care about authenticity more that it's always good to have freshly cooked bread with a BBQ and cooking it on the same grill would be handy.

I imagine that you need to use a flat bread so it cooks fast so something along the lines of pita breads might be an option.

tampacook's picture

Recipe for a middle eastern cinnamon laced flat bread. Help please.

October 22, 2008 - 1:45pm -- tampacook

This is my first post, as I have had no luck in finding a recipe for this.  I was lucky to have an Armenian bakery close to my college years ago, and besides having some of the best breads, they had some small, pita-like sweet breads, which if i remember correctly were called "amour".   They were about 8 inches in diameter and maybe 1/3 of an inch thick, very soft, and were marbled with cinnamon.  I've looked everywhere, but can't seem to find anything resembling them.  I would appreciate any help.

Clock's picture
Clock

Great success first time, used one third wholemeal spelt and two thirds AP. Best I've ever tasted.

KipperCat's picture
KipperCat

Since I wanted a small batch of these, I started with Floyd's recipe.  I also took note of MysticBunny's comment that she got the best flavor with an overnight sponge, knowing that this was very true of most breads.  To simplify things, I simply made Floyd's recipe using only 1/4 tsp. of yeast.  (I knew that reducing the yeast like this would stretch the rise time out to at least 15 hours.) Rather than a thorough mix or knead, I quickly mixed everything; let it rest a bit and then did a few stretch-and-folds.  I left the dough on the counter to ferment overnight.  The next day, the dough was at least tripled.  I wasn't ready to bake at this point so deflated, did another stretch-and-fold and refrigerated the dough.  Due to other circumstances, the dough sat in the fridge for a day and a half, not the few hours I had envisioned! 

I would have liked these a bit larger.  I'm not sure what thickness I rolled them to, but it was less than 1/4". The dough could have been a bit cool, or more likely I needed to let it relax for a few minutes.  At any rate, I couldn't roll them any thinner. I baked these for about 5 minutes, which allowed them all to puff and gave me a bit of color on the bread. The bread was delicious The dough didn't suffer too much from its long refrigeration.  Here it is, just before I shaped it.


Dinner was delicious

Everyone was hungry.

sourLou's picture

Recipe conversion

April 15, 2007 - 11:12am -- sourLou

Hello..

I want to make pitas using Floyd's pita recipe. Any suggestions how I should convert it to using a starter? I try to maintain my starter with equal weights flour/water. (i think that is considered 100% hydration)

Here is the recipe:

3 cups flour
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
1 Tablespoon sugar or honey
1 packet yeast (or, if from bulk, 2 teaspoons yeast)
1 1/4 to 1 1/2 cups water, roughly at room temperature
2 tablespoons olive oil, vegetable oil, butter, or shortening

Thanks!

Louis

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