The Fresh Loaf

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dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

The last bake was so nice and this one is very similar except for a few differences that….. made a difference.  The sprouts, seeds, nuts, prunes and dough flours were nearly identical except we ran out of barley berries.

  

Yeast water replaced the SD starter.  The YW levain used white whole wheat flour as half of the mix instead of the home milled whole grains of the previous bake.  The amount of whole grains and the hydration was increased 5% to 59% and 74% respectively.

  

The first 15 minutes of the bake was at 500 F instead of 450 F (because we forgot to turn it down after the pre-heat) and the resulting total bake time was reduced 15 minutes to 35 minutes.  We think the higher initial temperatures reduced the spring and the higher hydration caused the chacon to spread more as well.   The openness of the crumb was affected in that the usually large holes of the yeast water were muted .

  

Another change was that instead of putting the dough into the basket right after the  S& F was complete and then allowing the dough to ferment in the basket, on the counter for 1 and ½ hours before being retarded, this dough was allowed to ferment in the bowl for 1 ½ hours before being placed in the basket and then it was then immediately retarded.

 

Both bakes had a 40 hour retard and a 4 hour warm up on the heating pad before baking.  Instead of using decorative knots in the chacon we used balls instead since the dough was too slack to make into ropes without adding some flour. 

We were going to add some aromatic seeds like coriander and anise but forgot to put them in.   I thought that if we just put them on the top they would burn after seeing the color of the crust after yesterday’s bake. 

 

One thing we noticed was since the dough was much wetter it absorbed the rice flour in the basket so the white surface outlines of the last bake were mainly gone and we had a better picture of the deep, dark, mahogany color that must have been under the white on the last bake.

 

The crumb is more moist than the SD as was expected since YW makes a more moist crumb in bread than SD for some reason.  Glad we baked this to 206 F instead of 203 F like the SD version since it was still moist and soft.

The crumb is as open as the SD but the largest holes are in the YW version.  The most uniform holes holes are in the SD.  I never thought I would say this but, the YW multi-grain bread is more tasty, at least to my pallet which is quite unlike the Brownman I know and my apprentice loves sometimes :-)  Both breads are terrific ans some of the best that have come out of this kitchen.

Formula

YW Starter

Build 1

Total

%

White Whole Wheat

100

100

29.41%

AP

25

25

7.35%

Yeast Water

100

100

29.41%

Total Starter

225

225

66.18%

 

 

 

 

Starter

 

 

 

Hydration

80.00%

 

 

Levain % of Total

21.29%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

Toady Tom's Tasty   Toasted Tidbits

5

1.47%

 

Red Malt

3

0.88%

 

White Malt

3

0.88%

 

Buckwheat

24

7.06%

 

Quinoa

24

7.06%

 

Whole Wheat

24

7.06%

 

Spelt

24

7.06%

 

Kamut

24

7.06%

 

Dark Rye

24

7.06%

 

Potato Flakes

20

5.88%

 

Oat Flour

20

5.88%

 

AP

145

42.65%

 

Dough Flour

340

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

7

1.51%

Of Total Flour

Soaker & Sprout   Water

240

70.59%

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

70.59%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

465

 

 

YW 100. Sprout and   Soaker Water

340

 

 

Total Dough Hydration

73.12%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

74.19%

 

 

Total Weight

1,057

 

 

 

 

 

 

Whole Grains

59.14%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Scald

 

%

 

WW

12.5

3.68%

 

Rye

12.5

3.68%

 

Quinoa

12.5

3.68%

 

Kamut

12.5

3.68%

 

Buckwheat

12.5

3.68%

 

Spelt

12.5

3.68%

 

Total Scald

75

22.06%

 

 

 

 

 

Multigrain Sprouts

 

%

 

Kamut

12.5

3.68%

 

Quinoa

12.5

3.68%

 

Buckwheat

12.5

3.68%

 

Rye

12.5

3.68%

 

WW

12.5

3.68%

 

Spelt

12.5

3.68%

 

Total Sprouts

75

22.06%

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

Sunflower 15, Pumpkin   15. Prune 20

50

14.71%

 

Pistachio 15, Filbert   20

35

10.29%

 

Barley Malt

10

2.94%

 

Total

95

27.94%

 

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

No, No, No - My apprentice is not a nut!  This is a slightly more simple formula trying to achieve a balance between taste and holes.  Taste always wins out over holes and appearance in my book.  It has to taste good first before going to other wanted crumb and crust attributes.

 Sadly, when throwing boiling water into the hot cast iron skillet, water splashed onto the stone where the bread had just been placed - after sliding it off the peel taking the parchment paper with it.  No problem.  I will just tilt the stone and let the water run off.  But alas, the bread slid off onto the oven rack making a mess of some very nice bread up until that time.  Found a spatula and mooshed it back on the stone as best  we could but was left with a loaf that didn’t spring as well as it should and developed a strange knob hanging off the side of it.

It did taste great though and the WW, Bulgar and hemp sprouts came through and the texture of the crumb was further enhanced with the pistachio nuts and sunflower seeds.  The rye is subtle and WW is pronounced.  The crumb holes were OK even though they suffered the worst of the oven loading and steaming ordeal.  Formula and Method follow the crumb shots.

 

 Multi-grain SD w/ Multi Sprouts  2 Nuts and Seeds Somewhere 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SD Starter

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

SD Starter

25

 

 

25

5.41%

Rye

25

 

 

25

5.41%

WW

25

 

 

25

5.41%

AP

 

50

25

75

16.22%

Water

50

50

 

100

21.62%

Total

125

100

25

250

54.05%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Starter

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

137.5

29.73%

 

 

 

Water

112.5

24.32%

 

 

 

Hydration

81.82%

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

0

25.08%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

Rye

25

5.41%

 

 

 

6 Grain Cereal

25

5.41%

 

 

 

Dark Rye

25

5.41%

 

 

 

White WW

50

10.81%

 

 

 

Bread Flour

100

21.62%

 

 

 

AP

100

21.62%

 

 

 

Dough Flour

325

70.27%

 

 

 

Salt

7

1.51%

 

 

 

Water

260

56.22%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

80.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Multi-grain Sprouts

 

%

 

 

 

Hemp

25

5.41%

 

 

 

WW

25

5.41%

 

 

 

Bulgar

25

5.41%

 

 

 

Total Sprouts

75

16.22%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

 

Honey

10

2.16%

 

 

 

White Distatic Malt

10

2.16%

 

 

 

VW Gluten

10

2.16%

 

 

 

Pistachio/Sunflower

50

10.81%

 

 

 

Total

80

17.30%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

78.24%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

997

 

 

 

 

 Method

 Do the sprouts first by soaking them for 5 hours and then letting them rest on (2) damp paper towels, covered with another and plastic wrap and reserve until needed..

 The  method is similar to recent bakes.  A 3 stage SD levain build only this time the stages were 3 hours apart.  With the AZ kitchen temps hitting90 Fa 9 hour build was more than sufficient to get a strong levain.  Instead of rye based like last time, this one was more WW and AP flour based to fit the bread we were after for this bake.  The dough was more AP Bread flour and White WW than usual to go with the levain.

 We added some honey as it pairs so well with WWW.   Had some Hemp, WW and bulgur sprouting but WW was all that sprouted so the other 2 were a soaker.

 Autolyse the flours, the VWG and the diastatic malt,  all the water, less 10 g, 24 hours in the fridge and retarded the levain for 12 hours, all in hopes of bringing out the sour.  The next morning we kneaded the autolyse and levain with the added 10 g of water by hand  before kneading on KA 2 for 8 minutes with the dough hook.  Added the salt and knead for 2 more minutes on KA 3.

 Transferred the dough to a well oiled bowl since this is a high hydration dough and let rest for 20 minutes.  Do 4 S &F’s on a floured work surface, at 20 minute intervals- about 4-6 turns each depending on how the dough feels.  When it tightened up it was time to stop.  On the 5 th S& F fattened out the dough and incorporated the sprouts and nuts.  Do 1 more S&F for a total of 6.

 Let rest on the counter for 1 hour.  You may need longer if your kitchen isn’t 90 F.  Then refrigerate for 24 hours.  Take the dough out of the fridge and let it warm up for an hour.  Pre-shape by dragging the boule’s skin tight and then let rest for 10 minutes.  Shape and place in your favorite boule final proofing container - mine is a cloth lined basket that is well floured with rice flour and AP mixed 50-50.  But, you can make what ever shape suits your fancy.

 Let bread rise in a plastic bag until it passes the poke test - mine took 2 hours at 86-88 F.  Get oven ready at 500 F with steam and stone 45 minutes before bread is ready to bake.  Turn out of the basket onto parchment and peel, slash your favorite way and place on the stone with steam for 15 minutes turning temperature down to 450 after 5 minutes.   Remove steam and turn oven to 425 F convection and bake until the bread is 205 F in the middle.  Turn off oven and leave bread on the stone for 12 more minutes with oven door ajar to dry out.

 Move to a wire cooling rack to completely cool before cutting.

Jaydot's picture
Jaydot

Over the past couple of months I have been learning how to bake sourdough bread. I have produced a fair share of pale crusts, scorched bottoms, dense crumbs and one terrific doorstopper. I've spent hours on TFL looking for explanations and solutions (and finding them! Big thanks to all of you!). I think I'm slowly getting the hang of it. Last Sunday I tried my first sourdough with fruit and nuts and it all seemed to come together: it was delicious! As good a reason as any to start using the TFL blog :).


Loaves in the Big Green Egg


 


Formula:



  • 170 gr starter (I have a 100% hydration starter, maintained on roughly 1/3 rye and 2/3 wheat),

  • 230 gr water

  • 510 gr flour (about 20% wholemeal)

  • 10 gr salt

  • 250 gr dry ingredients for soaker: 100 gr raisins, 50 gr dried apricots chopped to raisin size, 50 gr hazelnuts crushed with a hammer, 50 gr rolled oats

  • zest from one medium orange, and some Madeira wine.


Method:



  • Start with the soaker: cover the dry ingredients with water and a generous splash of Madeira wine in a small saucepan, heat up to "nice and warm", leave to cool for 6 hours, stirring now and then. Put in a sieve to drain off the liquid before starting on the dough.

  • Mix flour, starter and water. Autolyse. Add salt and orange zest and knead gently (about 5 minutes). Rest a few minutes, add soaker and knead some more.

  • Bulk ferment, do a stretch&fold at 50 and 100 minutes.

  • Retard in fridge overnight.

  • Take out of fridge, allow about two hours to get back to room temperature (my fridge is very cold), divide and preshape. Benchrest. Shape (if any raisins have worked their way out of the dough, remove them or push them into the bottom of the boule) and proof.

  • Heat oven with stone to 220C (430F).

  • Slash and bake covered for the first 13 minutes. Let oven temp drop to 200C (390F) and bake another half hour.


Schedule:


I use a spreadsheet I made to calculate quantities and to keep track of when I need to do what. You can see it here (I'd be happy to share the original spreadsheet). My house if fairly cool (room temp around 66F), hence the long proofing times.


Crumb shot


Notes:


My basic bread formula is Flo's 1.2.3 formula, with just a bit less water, because I do all dough handling except the final shaping with wet hands. For final shaping I use flour.


I cover my loaves in the oven with a tinfoil hat shaped around an upturned banneton. Works like a charm.


250 grams of dry ingredients swells up to a much bigger and heavier load after soaking (smells nice, though). It was quite scary to tip that quantity onto the dough; hydration went up too, obviously. Still, I got a good windowpane after the second stretch & fold and the dough was still manageable (just).


Funny thing was that we couldn't find a trace of the oats in the finished loaf, but I think they did contribute to the taste.


The crumb was more dense than in my "daily" loaf (which is made using the same method, but without the soaker), there were no big holes. Still, it looked and felt lovely, pleasantly moist.


We had a loaf for lunch, even though it was still so warm that butter on a slice melted almost immediately. My lunch companions are very critical foodies, and they loved it (one of them is my brother, and believe me, he wouldn't say so just be polite :)).


It really was delicious - on its own, with butter or with strong dutch cheese!


 

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