The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

multigrain

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tororm's picture
tororm

After picking up a large batch of assorted grains and seeds I set to making a multigrain spelt loaf. I firstly soaked a mixture of the grains (which I unfortunately did not weigh) and mixed into a dough of white spelt with 13% gluten flour for a total hydration of 75%. I also added a teaspoon of cocoa for a little colour. 

 

Although a little overproofed, resulting in no oven spring, this was pretty much the best loaf I have ever made in terms of the consistency of crumb and taste. 

evonlim's picture
evonlim

the last bake was with raisins yeast water. it gave some super tasty loaves. trying my luck with some organic dried apricots this time, making yeast water. to my surprised it bubbles more and faster than the raisins. nice aroma and delicate sweetness. choices and supplies of flour is very limited. i only have bob's red mill graham flour on my shelve..hmm

steamed some japanese pumpkin and puree it. add 2 table spoon of maple syrup, 1 cup of toasted pumpkin seeds, 2 table spoon of pumpkin seeds oil.

 

 

here is the formula.. 

300gram graham flour

100gram bread flour 

100gram AP flour

300gram pumpkin puree

225gram apricot yeast water

200gram 100% hydration of avtive starter using yeast water 

autolysed for 30 mins, add

12gram sea salt

using SF method every 50 mins, 3 times, retard overnight in the fridge. brought it out rest for half an hour, shape it into 2 loaves. proof for 1 and half hour. baked 450F 20 mins covered and further 10 uncovered. 

 

2nd bake with apricot yeast water.

 used a newly discovered organic multigrain flour.. consist of wheat, bengal gram spilt dehusked, soybean, dehulled barley, fenugreek and psyllium husk.

 

added toasted brown sesame seeds and Nui coconut oil. 

same formula as above.. 

 

 

 

:) 

 

 

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

The quest for the New Your bagel continues.   This time we lowered the hydration 2% to 56%, used more barley malt, used 27% whole grains (the bulk of which was whole wheat in the dough flour to try to mimic first clear flour) and we used AP with VWG since we didn’t have any bread flour.

  

We also changed the process around a little bit too.  We built a full strength SD starter out of whole grains, stiffened it up to 65% and then let it sit in the fridge for 3 days to get sour.  Then we built a levain from that using 15 g of seed and whole grain spelt, rye and WW.  We made the yeast waster levain separately and replaced the whole spelt with AP flour.

 

Once the two levains had doubled, the SD levain was placed into the bottom of the container and the YW levain was put on top of that and they were placed in the fridge together for 2 days.

The levains were removed from the fridge to warm up.  While they warming we autolysed the rest of the ingredients, including; the salt, malts and VWG for 2 hours after having kneaded them together.  Dough like this would kill the KA so hand kneading is always the wiser choice but a hard slog.

After the levains hit the autolyse it took a while to work then in the hard dough by squeezing it through the fingers.  Then we kneaded the dough until it was tough but silky smooth.  After a 1 hour rest we shaped the bagels around the knuckles at 135 g each and put them on semolina dusted parchment where they rested for 1hour before gong into the fridge for a 32 hour retard.

  

Sorry, cut into one for a taste while they were still quite warm.

After coming out of the fridge, we let the bagels proof on the counter for 4 hours.  The bagels doubled over that time and then we refrigerated them again for 1 ½ hours to stiffen them up.  Next time we will put them back in the fridge after 3 hours and let them cool for 2.  The bagels were gently boiled for 30 seconds each side, in water that had barley malt and baking soda in it, just to shock them awake. 

 

Bagel hole?  Made a little dough ball for floating to see if the bagels were ready to boil and that they too would float!

They were flipped on a kitchen towel to get rid of the excess water and then dunked into the seed mixture.  The 3 mixes this time were white, brown and black poppy, white and black sesame and a multi-seed and salt one comprised of the previous seeds plus oregano and basil seeds, black and brown caraway seeds, nigella seeds and kosher salt.  We made twice as many of the combo salt ones since they are our favorite.

 

Looks and cuts better when fully cooled,

The steam was supplied by 1 of Sylvia’s steaming pans and a 12” skillet with lava rocks and we used both stones to accommodate the 13 bagels and 1 small roll.   They baked with steam at 450 F for 8 minutes and then steam was removed and they baked for another 8 minutes at 425 F convection until they were deemed done and nicely browned.

Beautiful skies don't have to be sunsets or sunrises.  The sunset was great too!

After deflating in the boil they managed to puff themselves back up nicely in the steam.  These are getting very close to NY SD Bagels and would be way sourer without the YW in the mix to tone it down.  The blistered crust is crispy, the crumb chewy but the taste is near spot on too.  Even my wife is having one for breakfast today instead of Einstein’s.  Now that takes some doing.  We like this batch very much but will make some changes next time as we always do still searching for the perfect bagel that doesn’t exist.

I never eat two bagels at once but did when they came out of the oven yesterday - yummy!  Cream cheese schmear and buttered with minneola marmalade.

Formula

SD Starter

Build 1

%

SD Desem & Rye Sour

15

1.34%

Spelt

18

1.80%

Whole Wheat

30

3.00%

Dark Rye

30

3.00%

Water

60

6.00%

Total Starter

153

12.90%

 

 

 

YW Starter

Build 1

%

Yeast Water

58

5.80%

AP

18

1.80%

WW

18

1.80%

Dark Rye

18

1.80%

Total

112

11.20%

 

 

 

Starters

 

%

Flour

115.5

11.55%

Water

125.5

12.55%

Hydration

108.66%

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

13.22%

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

Whole Wheat

200

20.00%

AP

800

80.00%

Dough Flour

1,000

100.00%

 

 

 

Salt

18

1.80%

Water

500

50.00%

Dough Hydration

50.00%

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

1,115.5

 

Water

625.5

 

T. Dough Hydration

56.07%

 

Whole Grain %

27.57%

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

56.27%

 

Total Weight

1,823

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

Red Rye Malt

5

0.50%

White Rye Malt

5

0.50%

VW Gluten

18

1.80%

Barley Malt

36

3.60%

Total

64

6.40%

 

Windischgirl's picture

Hobbit Alert! Need Lembas Bread ideas

January 26, 2013 - 6:50am -- Windischgirl
Forums: 

My 15 yo daughter has been very taken with the recent "The Hobbit" movie.  She's also always on the run with afterschool activities, always looking for "grab and go" foods while trying to maintain a vegetarian diet.  So last night she turns to me and says,

"I know what I need: Lembas Bread.  'One small bite is enough to fill a grown man.'"

So she gives me the backstory--it's a creation of Tolkien's, and he outlines critera for this bread, made by the Elves:

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

The last bake was so nice and this one is very similar except for a few differences that….. made a difference.  The sprouts, seeds, nuts, prunes and dough flours were nearly identical except we ran out of barley berries.

  

Yeast water replaced the SD starter.  The YW levain used white whole wheat flour as half of the mix instead of the home milled whole grains of the previous bake.  The amount of whole grains and the hydration was increased 5% to 59% and 74% respectively.

  

The first 15 minutes of the bake was at 500 F instead of 450 F (because we forgot to turn it down after the pre-heat) and the resulting total bake time was reduced 15 minutes to 35 minutes.  We think the higher initial temperatures reduced the spring and the higher hydration caused the chacon to spread more as well.   The openness of the crumb was affected in that the usually large holes of the yeast water were muted .

  

Another change was that instead of putting the dough into the basket right after the  S& F was complete and then allowing the dough to ferment in the basket, on the counter for 1 and ½ hours before being retarded, this dough was allowed to ferment in the bowl for 1 ½ hours before being placed in the basket and then it was then immediately retarded.

 

Both bakes had a 40 hour retard and a 4 hour warm up on the heating pad before baking.  Instead of using decorative knots in the chacon we used balls instead since the dough was too slack to make into ropes without adding some flour. 

We were going to add some aromatic seeds like coriander and anise but forgot to put them in.   I thought that if we just put them on the top they would burn after seeing the color of the crust after yesterday’s bake. 

 

One thing we noticed was since the dough was much wetter it absorbed the rice flour in the basket so the white surface outlines of the last bake were mainly gone and we had a better picture of the deep, dark, mahogany color that must have been under the white on the last bake.

 

The crumb is more moist than the SD as was expected since YW makes a more moist crumb in bread than SD for some reason.  Glad we baked this to 206 F instead of 203 F like the SD version since it was still moist and soft.

The crumb is as open as the SD but the largest holes are in the YW version.  The most uniform holes holes are in the SD.  I never thought I would say this but, the YW multi-grain bread is more tasty, at least to my pallet which is quite unlike the Brownman I know and my apprentice loves sometimes :-)  Both breads are terrific ans some of the best that have come out of this kitchen.

Formula

YW Starter

Build 1

Total

%

White Whole Wheat

100

100

29.41%

AP

25

25

7.35%

Yeast Water

100

100

29.41%

Total Starter

225

225

66.18%

 

 

 

 

Starter

 

 

 

Hydration

80.00%

 

 

Levain % of Total

21.29%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

Toady Tom's Tasty   Toasted Tidbits

5

1.47%

 

Red Malt

3

0.88%

 

White Malt

3

0.88%

 

Buckwheat

24

7.06%

 

Quinoa

24

7.06%

 

Whole Wheat

24

7.06%

 

Spelt

24

7.06%

 

Kamut

24

7.06%

 

Dark Rye

24

7.06%

 

Potato Flakes

20

5.88%

 

Oat Flour

20

5.88%

 

AP

145

42.65%

 

Dough Flour

340

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

7

1.51%

Of Total Flour

Soaker & Sprout   Water

240

70.59%

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

70.59%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

465

 

 

YW 100. Sprout and   Soaker Water

340

 

 

Total Dough Hydration

73.12%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

74.19%

 

 

Total Weight

1,057

 

 

 

 

 

 

Whole Grains

59.14%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Scald

 

%

 

WW

12.5

3.68%

 

Rye

12.5

3.68%

 

Quinoa

12.5

3.68%

 

Kamut

12.5

3.68%

 

Buckwheat

12.5

3.68%

 

Spelt

12.5

3.68%

 

Total Scald

75

22.06%

 

 

 

 

 

Multigrain Sprouts

 

%

 

Kamut

12.5

3.68%

 

Quinoa

12.5

3.68%

 

Buckwheat

12.5

3.68%

 

Rye

12.5

3.68%

 

WW

12.5

3.68%

 

Spelt

12.5

3.68%

 

Total Sprouts

75

22.06%

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

Sunflower 15, Pumpkin   15. Prune 20

50

14.71%

 

Pistachio 15, Filbert   20

35

10.29%

 

Barley Malt

10

2.94%

 

Total

95

27.94%

 

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Yesterday when I woke up and saw Phil’s post on Word Bread Day I knew we had to get cracking in order to get some kind of bread at least started on this world wide day devoted to bread.  Phil’s and Ying’s fantastic posts this week using figs seemed like a good place to start - not that my attempt would add up to half of their masterpieces.

  

Phil’s had anise and Ying’s had hazelnuts top go with the figs.  We can’t find hazelnuts for sale locally but we did have pistachios - one of the most overlooked nuts to include in breads.

  

Method

We also like sprouts and got some rye, WW and spelt berries soaking for 3 hours first thing even before we got the SD levain started and then got them sprouting between paper towels covered in plastic wrap.

  

This levain was a Desem and Rye sour SD combo since we combined our seed for both into one 4 days ago.  The levain totaled 220 g and used whole rye, WW and whole spelt for the flours.   The levain was a single stage build of 4 hours when it doubled.  The levain was 18% of the total weight and 40% of the total flour weight – pretty much our recent standard.

  

While the levain was building we also did a 4 hour autolyse of the flours (whole rye, spelt, wheat and some AP), salt and the 2 malts with the liquids, in this case water and a little coffee.  The 35 g of coffee was left over from breakfast and we hate throwing anything away food or drink wise.  We can’t find any difference in the bread of when the salt goes in the autolyse - before or after - so we have been putting it in at the beginning or at the end if we forget to put it in the beginning.

  

Once the autolyse and the levian came together we did French slap and folds for 10 minutes before resting it for 30 minutes in an oiled Tupperware tub.  We then did (3) S&Fs on 30 minute intervals and incorporated the add ins during the last S&F.  We like combining the two gluten development methods when there is a higher percentage of whole grains, over 42% in this case and higher hydrations 83% here.

  

Once the 2 hour fermentation with S&F’s was complete we put in the fridge for a nice cool 37 F retard of 14 hours. In the morning we warmed it up for an hour before pre-shaping and final shaping it into a boule and placing it seam side up in a well floured basket.  This is a sticky dough so some flour on the hands really helps in this regard.

  

Once shaped and in a basket we bagged it in a trash can liner and let it final proof on the counter for 2 hours before firing up Old Betsy to 500 F for a 45 minute pre-heat with 2 of Sylvia’s steaming Pyrex loaf pans with water and towels in place.   Total final proof was 2 and ¾ hours and it had risen above the basket.  

 

When we went to un-mold the dough on a parchment covered peel the basket slipped and half the dough never made it to the peel.  We tried to lift the part that didn’t make the move with a scraper and slide it further on the peel while sliding another piece of parchment under it but the middle stuck to the peel.

 

The middle of the loaf deflated and we should have immediately turned it into a Fendu since the middle was the most severely disfigured.  We slashed it instead and tried our best to get it off the peel without doing further damage.  But alas, 2/3rds the height in the basket disappeared as it was pulled apart to spread faster than oil in a hot iron skillet.

 

Still, the bread managed to recover to half its basket height in spring while under steam for 15 minutes after turning the oven down to 450 F when the bread went in.  At the 15 minute mark the steam was removed and the oven turned down to 425 F - convection this time.

  

Every 5 minutes the mishap prone boule was turned 120 degrees every 5 minutes there after over the next 15 minutes until it read 208 F in the center when tested.  The boule was allowed to rest on the stone in the now off oven and the door ajar for 10 minutes to crisp the skin.  It was then removed an allowed to cool before being used a Frisbee by my apprentice and her buddies in the back yard, well she wanted to play with it .... 

 

This bread smells great, looks unusual and the crust is unique as a result of the harsh un-molding technique that we will definitely use more often to coax some individuality and character in out breads.  Plus we are already tired of having stuff turn out perfect every time now that peace and perfection have broken out in the world after Bread Day!  This bread plain tastes amazing.  The anise is subtle but comes through.   The sweet figs go so well with pistachios.   The crumb, even though the holes were 1/3rd what they should have been still is light and airyand it  just looks stunning with the contrast between the 2 kinds of figs and the green pistachios.  This is one of those breads we make over and over again.  Thanks to Phil and Empress Ying!  Well done you two!

We originally made this bread for the dentist but am now unsure how much more pain I sould suffer over this bread.   If it cuts well and has at least one hole bigger than a pea, then we will cut off the best part for the Pain Miester and take our chances.  So this bread is called Pain Maître douleur - Pain Master Bread.

 Formula

World Bread Day - SD   Multigrain Bread

 

 

with Figs, Anise,   Pistachios and Sprouts

 

 

 

Desem  & Rye Starter

Build 1

%

SD Desem / Rye Sour

20

3.69%

Rye

34

7.87%

Spelt

33

7.64%

WW

33

7.64%

Water

100

23.15%

Total Starter

220

50.93%

 

 

 

Starter

 

 

Hydration

100.00%

 

Levain % of Total

17.90%

40.59%

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

Whole Rye

50

11.57%

Whole Wheat

32

7.41%

Potato Flakes

10

2.31%

Oats

20

4.63%

Whole Spelt

18

4.17%

AP

302

69.91%

Dough Flour

432

100.00%

 

 

 

Salt

9

2.08%

Water - 300, Coffee -   35

335

77.55%

Dough Hydration

77.55%

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

542

 

Total Water &   Coffee

445

 

T. Dough Hydration

82.10%

 

Whole Grain %

42.62%

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

83.06%

 

Total Weight

1,256

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

White Rye Malt

1

0.23%

Pistachio Nuts

55

12.73%

Figs - Brown and Black

100

23.15%

Anise Seeds

20

4.63%

Barley Malt

12

2.78%

Total

173

40.05%

 

 

 

Multigrain Sprouts

 

%

WW

20

4.63%

Rye

20

4.63%

Spelt

20

4.63%

Total Sprouts

60

13.89%

 

 

 

27 g of water was soaked up by the sprouts

and included it total   weight only.

 

 

 

 

Note - 50 g each of    Black Mission and Adriadic figs

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

This bread originally started out to be baguettes along the line of the one Ian (isand66) baked this last week only with the addition of SD to his YW only levain.

  

 I was going to do a Pierre Nury take, no slash, Rustic Light Rye approach to it where you just cut a 10” square proofed dough into (2) 5”x10” rectangles,  stretch the dough to 12”and just let it plop on the parchment - no slashing required and then right into the oven it goes.  But then, my wife needs sandwich bread too?

  

The SD /YW combo levain was under way when Pip’s (Phil) latest fabulous bread hid TFL.   I decided to change the dough flours around to match his 15 % of fresh milled whole grains even though we used a multigrain approach, since they were already ground earlier in the day, which was different than Phil’s spelt. Both Ian and Phil used 75% hydration so we went with that.   

  

We cut Phil’s recipe to 1,200 g from 3,600.   We also decided to use Phil’s method of 6 hour levain build, long autolyse (5-6 hours) holding back some water, 3 minutes French fold (I used French Slap and Folds thinking they might be the same thing and we like doing them), add in the salt and the rest of water and squeezing the dough through the fingers until it come back together, another 3 minutes of French slap and folds, and a 4 hour bulk rise with no touching – no stretch and folds.

  

We pre-shaped and shaped going into a basket for 2 hours of proof on the counter, then into the fridge for a 12 hour retard.  It came out of the fridge in the morning nicely risen for another hour of warm up before going into the steaming mini oven oven at 500 F, steaming for 12 minutes with oven turned down to 450 F after 2 minutes.

 

 

Since my levain was already 21% of the final dough weight instead of the 10% that Phil used, I decided to cut the 4 hour bulk ferment in half to 2 hours undisturbed and the final proof from 2 hours to 1 hour before going into the fridge.  The rest of Phil’s method was not modified other than we went with a boule instead of a batard and used Ian’s signature T-Rex scoring since we skipped his baggies but we will do them soon.

 

Somehow Pierre Nury’s cut and stretch Rustic Method was not incorporated and he deserves better than that so we will use it next time.  It is odd how things can change based on a really good bread posted on TFL – like Phil’s.  Mine won’t come out as nice as Phil’s but, just the thought that it might, is worth the doing. 

  

The scoring went well as my apprentice modified, (bent), our single side razor blade into a gentle curve like a lame blade.  The boule puffed itself up very well during the 12 minute steaming using a combination of (1) of Sylvia’s steaming cups and  our latest bake’ bottom broiler pan with ½ C of water,  covered with the vented top of the broiler pan where the parchment and bread bakes.

 

After the steam came out, we baked the bread at 400 F, convection this time, for an additional 16 minutes (28 minutes overall) turning the boule 90 degrees every 4 minutes.  When the center hit 205 F we turned off the oven, left the door ajar and allowed the boule to cool in the oven for an additional 12 minutes.  The temperature rose to 209 F while resting in the off mini oven.

 

The bread sprang so much it was little close to the top elements and got a little dark on the top but, no worries, it wasn’t burnt and should add a little extra yumminess to the crust.  The mini (and steam) provided its signature blisters to the crust.  It came out crunchy crisp and shattered and cracked where it got the hottest as it cooled.  The crust softened as it cooled to become chewy.

The bottom wasn’t as brown as usual.  This has to be due to the water in the lower half of the broiler pan that was less than an1” from the bread.  Even though the spring was great with blisters we will go back to either Sylvia’s steam alone or covering the bread with a stainless steel bowl which will also keep the top from browning too much and still give us dark brown bottom crust and blisters.

This is also the largest boule we can possibly put in the mini oven.  It stuck to steaming cup and the side of the broiler pan as it was.  We think a loaf that was 200 g less in size would be more prudent.

The crumb came out fairly open but nearly as much as Phil’s did.   This because he is such a fine baker and my apprentice is not.   Plus, we used YW and cut the counter development time by about 2 hours or so to take into account we used twice as much levain.

But the crumb was glossy, moist, airy and light like our recent YW.SD bakes have been.   We will follow Phil’s methods more closely next time.   The taste is very good  Just what my wife will like for her lunch sandwich bread.   

15% Multi-grain Bread With YW and SD Combo Levain

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mixed Starter

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

SD Starter

0

10

0

10

1.49%

Yeast Water

50

0

0

50

9.29%

WW

10

0

0

10

1.86%

Durum Atta

0

10

0

10

1.86%

AP

40

45

25

110

20.45%

Water

0

55

10

65

12.08%

Total Starter

100

120

35

255

47.40%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Starter Totals

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration

88.89%

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

21.27%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

Wheat Germ

10

1.86%

 

 

 

Whole Wheat

10

1.86%

 

 

 

Whole Buckwheat

10

1.86%

 

 

 

Dark Rye

12

2.23%

 

 

 

Bulgar

10

1.86%

 

 

 

Whole Spelt

12

2.23%

 

 

 

Whole Kamut

12

2.23%

 

 

 

Whole Barley

10

1.86%

 

 

 

Bread Flour

201

37.36%

 

 

 

AP

231

42.94%

 

 

 

Steel Cut Oats

10

1.86%

 

 

 

Quinoa

10

1.86%

 

 

 

 

Total Dough Flour

538

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

11

2.04%

 

 

 

Water

385

71.56%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

71.56%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

673

 

 

 

 

Water

505

 

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

75.04%

 

 

 

 

Whole Grain %

15.01%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

75.04%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

1,199

 

 

 

 

 

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Nothing new here, my old favorite: Hamelman’s Whole-wheat multigrain.  This time, though, and as I have come to appreciate sourdough preferments, as opposed to yeasted ones; I chose to skip the Instant yeast altogether. I have also chosen a new collection of grains for my hot soaker: Rolled oats, millet, Semolina,  and sunflower seeds.

The initial fermentation took 3 hours, while the final fermentation was  5 hours. I increased the hydration as the dough was stiff, and ended up with an over hydrated dough. To adjust, I added 50-50% whole wheat flour  to bread flour to arrive at a medium to loose hydration. It was wet, still.

The preferment % was reduced as a result of adding more flours to around 9% from 12%.

My Rye Sourdough is dead. I have rushed it once by adding more than comfortable warm water, and since then it seemed to go down the path of demise. Luckily, I can create one easily from my white levain.

For a change, i wanted to bake this bread in a pan.

Although i have not tasted the bread yet, i could describe it as follows:

Soft crust, with rich sourdough aroma. Crumb is open, cool and moist, with an appreciable sour aroma.

I have yet to decide whether or not the 100% sourdough version is better tasting than the sweeter yeasted version.

Update: The flavor of the bread was great. the extended final fermentation did mask the subtle sweetness and wheatiness of the bread, and the sour tang was clearly present. Lovely bread, nevertheless.

Khalid

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

After pinching off 100g of this combo; Yeast Water and Joe Ortiz’s Cumin, WW Sourdough starter for the donuts and English muffins this past Sunday, we used the remaining 230g of combo starter to make some semolina, durum atta and white whole wheat based herbed bialy’s that had a filling of home made chorizo, caramelized onions, 4 cheeses; brie, aged cheddar, pepper jack and pecorino cheese. The herbs were basil and cilantro.

What a beauty with the cilantro sprinkled on top.

The previous YW bialy’s we made here:

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/27712/yeast-water-rye-ww-garlic-chive-onion-cheese-and-chorizo-bialy%E2%80%99s

where we used YW only for the levain, used much lower % of whole grains and only used a small amount of pepper jack cheese with the only herb being a garlic chive in the dough. The best thing about the old bake was the unbelievable open crumb. Everything else about the new bake turned out better than the old one.

Chorizo and onion mix before caramelizing.

This bake built on the previous one without autolyse, but we gussied it up and baked it with Sylvia’s steam this time while making it a totally hand made dough. Because of the steam and50 Flower temperature, the bake took longer than the previous one that was 10 minute long. This one took 5 min of steam and then 10 more minutes to finish.

These bialys were just delicious with a slight SD tang that we hope will develop over the next 24 hours. We continue to be impressed with the JoeOrtizSDstarter and when mixed with the YW created a nice, light, open crumb and a crust that was thin and chewy. The filling was built up from the bottom starting with fresh basil a cube of double creme and a cube of Alpine Lace Swiss, then a tablespoon or so of the chorizo and caramelized onion mix, with 4 cubes of cheese on top (2 cubes of pepper jack, 1 cube of pecorino and a cube of aged, super sharp cheddar.

Before proofing.

The Method

was straight forward. The combo YW SD was built up over (2) 3 hour builds and (1) 2 hour build and then it was refrigerated for 72 hours. But there was no need to refrigerate it other than to fit my scedule

The chorizo and onions were sautéed until caramelized and refrigerated until needed.

Spooned and docked after proofing.

After warming up, the levain was mixed with the dough water to break it up and the salt, flour, dried potato flakes, barley malt, molasses and butter were added to the mix. After combining by hand, the dough was emptied out to a slightly floured surface and kneaded by hand for 5 minutes. It was fully developed and the dough rebounded immediately when two fingers were poked into the dough. The dough was rested for 20 minutes and then 2 sets of 4 S & F’s each were done on 15 minute intervals. The dough was then allowed to ferment for 1 ½ hours until it had nearly doubled.

Sylvia's Steam in the microwave heating up.

The dough was divided into (10) roughly 100g pieces and hand formed into tight balls. These balls were rested for 10 minutes and then formed into little pizza shapes by picking them up and hanging them in the vertical while pressing out the centers.

Mis en place for filling the unspooned and undocked bialys

These were placed on semolina sprinkled parchment paper on un-rimmed baking sheets. The centers were then pressed out again before covering with plastic wrap to proof for another hour. At the 30 minute proofing mark the oven was preheated to 500 F regular bake and Sylvia’s Steam was prepared in the microwave and placed in the bottom of the oven.

Basil and brie first then Alpine Lace went in too on this level but not shown for som reason..

After proofing, the centers of the bialys were then pressed out flat again with a wet spoon and the centers docked with a fork to keep them from puffing in the oven. Some basil leaves were placed in the bottom with a cube of brie and a cube of Alpine Lace Swiss, a tablespoon of chorizo was added and flattened out to fill the well and 2 cubes of pepper jack and 1 cube of each of aged cheddar and pecorino were placed on top.

Chorizo, and 3 more cheeses, pecorino in the middle, flanked by cheddar and pepperjack.

The bialys were placed onto the middle oven rack with the stone one very top rack and steam below. At 2 minutes the temperature was turned down to 450 F regular bake. At 5 minutes the steam was removed and the temperature turned down to 425 F convection this time as the bialys were rotated 180 degrees on the oven rack. At the 10 minute mark the bialys were rotated 180 degree again and at 15 minutes they were done and moved to cooling racks. The fresh chopped cilantro was then sprinkled on top

Before the cilantro went on.

The formula follows the pix’s.

Cut vertical with my daughter apprentice holding before scarfing.  She liked them!

Cut horizontal.  Not as open as the first YW only ones but these tasted so much better.  Will make them again.

SD & YW Semolina, Durrum Atta, WWW Bialy's w/ Caramelized Onion, Chorizo and 4 cheeses     
      
Mixed StarterBuild 1Build 2Build 3Total%
SD Starter2000203.48%
Yeast Water3500357.61%
S. White Wheat21170388.26%
Durum Atta16017337.17%
WWW01717347.39%
Water035357015.22%
Total Starter92696923050.00%
      
Starter     
Hydration100.00%    
Levain % of Total22.14%    
      
Dough Flour %   
Durum Atta10021.74%   
Bread Flour20043.48%   
White WW5010.87%   
Potato Flakes102.17%   
Semolina10021.74%   
Dough Flour460100.00%   
Salt91.96%   
Water26056.52%   
Dough Hydration56.52%    
      
Total Flour575    
Water - 340, YW -35375    
T. Dough Hydration65.22%    
Whole Grain %46.09%    
      
Hydration w/ Adds70.09%    
Total Weight1,039    
      
Add - Ins %   
Barley Malt204.35%   
Molasses204.35%   
Butter408.70%   
Total Add Ins8017.39%   

 

Apprentice takes a nice 105 F bake herself in the backyard oven.  Dumb Doxie !!!

 

 

 

 

hanseata's picture
hanseata

The owner of A&B Naturals, the store that sells my bread, asked me one day: "Can you bake pitas, too?" I had never made them, so I said with conviction: "Yes!"

At least I knew where I could find a pita recipe!

In "Whole Grain Breads", one of my favorite baking books, Peter Reinhart has a recipe for whole wheat pitas - just the right thing for my grain loving customers.

I started my first pita dough. No big deal, until I got to the shaping part. The pitas had to be rolled out no thinner than 1/4 inch (6 mm), and to an 8-inch (20 cm) diameter. But my pitas already reached this thickness at 6 1/2 to 7 inches (16 to 18 cm.)

Pitas are shaped in three steps, first into rolls, then rolled out to 4"/10 cm. Don't skimp on the flouring!

Below: rolling out pitas to a larger round (6 1/2 - 7" or 16 - 18 cm.) Re-flour them, if necessary.

A high oven temperature is key to a pita's proper horizontal separation into two layers. This high temperature has to be maintained during the whole bake, from below as well as from above.

Many cheaper ovens don't heat up to the necessary 550ºF (280ºC.) Without that boost pitas can't produce the large gas bubble that creates a pocket. And without a pocket - no delicious filling!

A baking stone, or a rack lined with unglazed terracotta tiles (like I have), works best for keeping the  temperature stable, even when the oven door has to be opened several time during the baking process. And very hot stones make the best baking surface for pitas, too.

To reheat fast enough after each opening of the door I remembered Peter Reinhart's advice for baking pizza ("American Pie"), where the problem is the same: intermittently switching the oven to broil for a short time.

How many pitas can you bake at the same time? One batch of dough makes 8 (or 6, if you want larger ones.) Peter Reinhart says one at a time, but, of course, being a semi-professional I wanted to do it a little less time consuming.

After some trials, I found that I can put two at the same time in the oven. That's the maximum, with more it becomes very difficult to load and unload them without damage, and to keep control over their baking process.

2 pitas can be baked at the same time. Once out of the oven, they deflate quickly.

Of course, it takes a little bit of experience to slide the pitas into the oven without them folding over in one place, and to extricate them without nicking them with the peel.

But it's not rocket science, a smart child can do it:

  Josh, our carpenter's son, thought it was much more fun to help with my baking than reading his book!

Though Peter Reinhart's original 100% whole wheat pita is very good, I made a few changes to it. I substitute a 7-grain mix for some of the whole wheat flour, and add an overnight bulk rise in the fridge, this is more practical for my baking schedule, and, in my opinion, improves the taste even more. It also has the advantage that I can reduce the yeast amount by 2 grams.

Though I usually cut down on the sweetener in Peter Reinhart's recipes, this whole grain bread needs the full dose.

We like our pita filled with grilled Halloumi cheese, tomato and lettuce - the way we had it in Girne/Kyrenia on Cyprus. And how do my customers at A&B Naturals like them? They fly off the shelf so that I have to bake them every week!

Here is a link to the recipe in my blog "Brot & Bread".

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