The Fresh Loaf

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multi-grain sourdough bread

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dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

This is an continuation of the last multi-grain SD bake except that the hydration is slightly lower at 68%, the multi-grain flours were 54 %, the add in goodies are increased substantially since this bread has multi-grain sprouts to go with the multi-grain soaker and we also have pumpkin and sunflower seeds, as well as, pistachio and filbert nuts with a hint of prunes too.

  

We like the last bake very much but we decided to bake this bread differently in that rather than baking on a stone with a combination of Sylvia’s and David’s steam, we baked this bread on a stone with a Goodwill bought DO bottom overturned on the chacon.

  

We followed the same method as last time with 10 min of French lap and folds but instead of using S&Fs to incorporate the scald, sprouts, seeds and nuts we used French folds every 15 minutes 3 times to incorporate the add ins and then used one S&F at the end of an hour to round out gluten development..

  

The dough was rested for 10 minutes before shaping the center ball of the chacon, its 4 surrounding knotted rolls and the really big bialy, made by stretching it like a pizza from the edge hanging down to cover the rest of the shapes in the basket.  Each was put into rice flour, basket side only, before being placed in a rice floured basket.

 

We then let the dough develop on the heating pad for 1 1/2 hours before refrigerating for 40 hours at 38 F in a plastic trash can liner.  It rose about 50% in the fridge which is what we were expecting.  We then took it out of the fridge and put it back on the heating pad for 3 hours before starting up Big Old Betsy to preheat at 500 F.

 

By the time Betsy got up to temperature and we added 20 minutes to the preheat, to get the stone up to 500 F too,  The dough had been on the pad for 4 hours and was still about 50% in volume greater than when it went into the basket.  We un-molded the chacon using a parchment covered peel and slid the chacon onto the stone while covering it with the DO bottom as a cloche.

 

After 2 minutes we turned the oven down to 450 F and continued to bake it a total of 20 minutes covered and then removed the DO bottom and turned the oven down to 425 F, convection this time.

 

Every 5 minutes we rotated the bread on the stone 90 degrees and in another 30 minutes the bread hit 203 F and we turned off the oven cracked the door and allowed the bread to crisp on the stone for 8 more minutes before removing it to a cooling rack.  It reached 207 F while resting on the stone.

 

The bread really looks great on the outside, beautifully cracked and brown as one would want even though it didn’t spring much in the oven.  We didn’t expect it to spring though after it didn’t do much on the heating pad for 4 hours either. It smells terrific enough.   We sure hope this fine looker is not a brick on the inside but we will have to wait until we slice it later today, well after it cools.

Formula

Multi-grain Sourdough with Sprouts, Scald, Seeds, Nuts and Prunes

 

 

 

Starter

Build 1

Total

%

SD Starter

20

20

4.65%

Buckwheat

4

4

1.18%

Quinoa

4

4

1.18%

Barley

4

4

1.18%

Whole Wheat

5

5

1.47%

Spelt

4

4

1.18%

Kamut

4

4

1.18%

Dark Rye

5

5

1.47%

White Whole Wheat

20

20

5.88%

AP

30

30

8.82%

Water

60

60

17.65%

Total Starter

160

160

47.06%

 

 

 

 

Starter

 

 

 

Hydration

77.78%

 

 

Levain % of Total

16.55%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

Toady Tom's Tasty Toasted Tidbits

4

1.18%

 

Red Malt

3

0.88%

 

White Malt

3

0.88%

 

Buckwheat

21

6.18%

 

Quinoa

21

6.18%

 

Whole Wheat

20

5.88%

 

Spelt

21

6.18%

 

Kamut

21

6.18%

 

Barley

21

6.18%

 

Dark Rye

20

5.88%

 

Potato Flakes

20

5.88%

 

Oat Flour

20

5.88%

 

AP

145

42.65%

 

Dough Flour

340

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

7

1.63%

 

Soaker & Sprout Water

220

64.71%

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

64.71%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

430

 

 

Water 70. Sprout and Soaker Water

290

 

 

Total Dough Hydration

67.44%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

68.02%

 

 

Total Weight

967

 

 

 

 

 

 

Whole Grains

54.65%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Scald

 

%

 

WW

12.5

3.68%

 

Rye

12.5

3.68%

 

Quinoa

12.5

3.68%

 

Kamut

12.5

3.68%

 

Buckwheat

12.5

3.68%

 

Spelt

12.5

3.68%

 

Total Scald

75

22.06%

 

 

 

 

 

Multigrain Sprouts

 

%

 

Kamut

12.5

3.68%

 

Quinoa

12.5

3.68%

 

Buckwheat

12.5

3.68%

 

Rye

12.5

3.68%

 

WW

12.5

3.68%

 

Spelt

12.5

3.68%

 

Total Sprouts

75

22.06%

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

Sunflower 15, Pumpkin 15. Prune 20

50

14.71%

 

Pistachio 15, Filbert 20

35

10.29%

 

Barley Malt

5

1.47%

 

Total

90

26.47%

 

 

isand66's picture
isand66

Okay, so every time I go down to my basement I keep passing the bottle of Peppermint Mocha Kahlua staring at me from its perch on our bar.  It's red and white bottle was just yelling at me to try it in a bread or down some with ice, so I decided to do both.

I rediscovered some interesting nut flours that I had in my refrigerator and decided to mix  the toasted almond and hazelnut flours with some fresh milled rye flour.  I really like the effect a soaker/scald has on a multi-grain bread so I mixed up some cracked wheat, red quinoa and bulgur wheat with some hot water.  It is interesting how these ingredients sucked up every last bit of water as when I added them to the dough there was not a dry eye in the house or the bowl.  The official way of calculating the hydration of a dough is to not include the water sucked up by the soaker, but I warn you this bread is a wet one especially due to the soaker.

I also deviated from my normal starter and used a 100% AP starter instead of my normal 65% starter.  I also used a much smaller amount of starter mainly due to that I didn't have any more left to use.  I used 222 grams of this starter versus the usual 425 grams of my dryer starter.

I have to say the end result of this bake was very satisfying.  If you don't like moist bread, then this one is not for you as the final dough was probably the most  moist  I have made to date.  The crumb melts in your mouth and you can really taste the nut flours but not really the Kahula.  I thing the Kahlua definitely contributed to the moist crumb for sure.

And now for the directions if you are so inclined:

Soaker

100 grams Cracked Wheat

100 grams Red Quinoa

60 grams Bulgar Wheat

250 grams Hot Water

Mix water in a bowl with other ingredients and let sit covered at room temperature for 1 hours or overnight.

Main Dough

Ingredients

222 grams Starter at 100% Hydration

200 grams Bread Flour (KAF)

65 grams Toasted Almond Flour (KAF)

65 grams Roasted Hazelnut Flour (KAF)

269 grams Freshly Ground  Rye Flour

256 grams Peppermint Mocha Kahlua at room temperature

100 grams Water at room temperature

14 grams Sea Salt (or table salt)

Procedure

I mixed  the flours and starter together with all the liquids  except for 50 grams of Kahlua and let them autolyes for 20 minutes.    I then added the soaker and the rest of the Kahlua with the salt and mixed on speed #1 for 3 minute and #2 for 2 minutes.  I then did a stretch and fold, rested the dough uncovered for 10 minutes.  Since this dough is very wet I put it in an oiled bowl and did another stretch and fold, covered the dough and let it rest for 10 minutes.  I did one more stretch and fold and let it rest out for another 2 hours after which I put it in the refrigerator until the next day.

The next day I let the dough sit out at room temperature for 2 hours.  After 2 hours I formed it into a miche boule and put it in a floured banneton which has a cloth insert and let it rise covered for 2 hours.  Make sure to either use a cloth insert or use a loaf pan as this dough is very, very moist.

After 2 hours or when the dough passes the poke test, score the loaf as desired and prepare your oven for baking with steam.

I warm my oven to 500 F. and once I put the loaf in the oven I add 1 cup of boiling water in a heavy-duty pan on the bottom shelf of my oven and lower the temperature to 450 degrees F.

Bake the loaf for around 40-50  minutes until the crust is nice and  golden brown and reaches an internal temperature of 200 - 210 degrees F.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

The retarded loaf came out almost identical to the non retarded one.  It was perhaps a little more sour.  Tasting the non retarded one from yesterday, it is more sour today and about the same sour as the retarded one just out of the oven.  I would guess the retarded boule will be even more sour tomorrow too.  This bread is hard to make but worth it.  I never had a bread that tastes like it, the crust is dark and softens as it cools, the crumb is moist and open, for 40% whole grain bread.  It is one of the best breads I have ever had, much less baked.  it just looks great too with the dark crust and deep yellow crumb.  Here some pix's of the retarded version 5 of  Brachflachen Mehrere Vollkombrot.

Pre-shaped

Passes poke test

Slashed

Just out of the oven

Can you find the hairs?

Crumb and crust close up

Preparing for a

Nice lunch of grilled turkey franks on super-grain challah with cheese, pickled peppers and mustard, pickles, tomatoes,  apples and a home grown salad.

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Today, I baked Hamelman's "5-grain Levain" from "Bread."


Various TFL blogs have featured this bread. They can be found by searching the site. The recipe was posted by fleur-de-liz here: Eric: Hamelman's Five-Grain Levain. She was a very active contributor to TFL at the time I joined and an inspiration to me. She encouraged me to bake this bread for the first time way back when. It is, indeed, among the most delicious breads I've ever made or tasted.




David

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