The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Monkey bread

  • Pin It
baybakin's picture
baybakin

I know I've been slacking on the posting lately, so here's my pictures post of some recent breads I've done.


Dmsnyder's SF sourdough take IV (http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/27892/my-san-francisco-sourdough-quest-take-4)

Changes: replaced all flour for Central Milling's type 70 high extraction flour.  Bulk ferment pre-shape instead of post-shape.  Baked in a dutch oven.
This one turned out quite sour, not quite boudin-sour, but still very nice.

Monkey Bread:

Using my house sweet dough, balls of dough are dipped in butter then rolled into chopped walnuts and raw sugar.
Baked into a bunt pan covered in butter and sprinkled with sliced almonds.

xfarmer's sourdough Croissants: (http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/23342/croissant-sourdough-starter-txfarmer-vs-tx-summer)

They came out a bit toasty, my oven runs a tad hot.  Made a few into breakfast sanwiches.  Sharp cheddar with egg and ham, served with some nice coffee (dab of cream)

freerk's picture
freerk

Chestnut-Mincemeat Monkey Bread

Baking is getting more festive by the day. The BreadLab is a mess after a trial bake for the X-mas specials that are up for the coming two weeks.

Chestnuts

The flavor and texture of chestnut can really lift a dish, when used in moderation. The other week, running through Amsterdam's hottest local produce supermarket Marqt, there were some fresh chestnuts available. They would look real rustic, together with the red onions and roseval potatoes in the basket on the kitchen table...

They have been screaming not be wasted for looking pretty ever since, and today, when the sour cherries on syrup started their siren song, things started coming together. The theme clearly being nuts and fruits, let's cross the channel and ponder on that typical British dish;

Mincemeat

Something allegedly edible that I managed to avoid for its name alone in the first two decades of my life. To the foreign ear it sounds like something with mutton sausage and a lot of gravy in it, that has been sitting in the cellar for three months. There is a lot of that where I come from. No need to explore.

Only to find out in the next decade that there is actually no meat involved at all, well... suet. But that was way back when. I do sometimes use lard and suet and the likes, but this sweet bread needs to go down easy with every one.

After making a basic mincemeat, boil the fresh chestnuts in their skins until tender, but still chewy. Chopping them up I decided to just chuck them in with the mincemeat, and that worked wonderfully well.

Sour cherries

Sour cherries belong to New Year's Eve for me. I never knew that until I rediscovered the taste of them recently, the syrupy variety. I was immediately taken back; in my young years, when the adults would be seriously boozing in the New Year, the kids were allowed to drink something that was called "children's-liquor" (No, I kid you not). It came in a bottle that vaguely resembled the grown-ups' version. It was a deep red, sweet as hell and... without alcohol (I guess the marketing guys drew their lines somewhere in the sixties...). But that didn't seem to matter to us, as I remember. For me it was one of the high lights; that entire day, going around the neighborhood to wish every one a Happy New Year, and every house I entered had a glass of that stuff waiting. My Italian shop around the corner carries some nice jars with sour cherries on syrup, the blue one;

Raisins, apples, lemon zest, currants. Take whatever you have lying around to whip together a fruity, spicy layer of mincemeat that will ooze through the monkey bread during the bake. The chestnuts are optional if you are an avid hater (there seem to be quite a few out there), but it does give the flavor a nice twist, and, if chopped coarsely and not boiled to pieces, a different texture that works well with all the sticky caramel and the soft buns.

Since my first monkey bread, traditionally round, was rising all over the place, out of its baking tin, I decided the second bake would have to be in the biggest tin around... and that happened to be a square one. A happy accident, I would say!

Square Chestnut-Mincemeat Monkey Bread

For the (mini portion) mincemeat:

1 small apple
100 gr. boiled chestnut, coarsely chopped
30 gr. raisins
25 gr. currants
30 gr. prunes
20 gr. sour cherries (on syrup)
dark beer, about 60 ml.
75 gr. brown sugar
pinch of lemon zest
dash of lemon juice
a nob of butter
pumpkin pie spice to taste, about ¾ tsp
rum

If you like your apple firm, leave them out, while you bring the beer and all the other ingredients to a slow boil. When everything comes together and the butter is mixed in, add the apple and turn off the gas. Stir and cool.

You can find some good tips over here on how to boil your chestnuts, if you chose to go DIY all the way.

For the dough:

500 gr. bread flour
14 gr. instant yeast
150-175 ml lukewarm whole milk
2 beaten eggs
50 gr. butter
2 tbs honey
2 tsp pumpkin pie spice
1½ tsp salt

to sugar the monkey dough:

100 gr. caster sugar
2 tsp pumpkin pie spice

For the caramel sauce:

100 gr. butter
50 gr. dark brown sugar

Method

Mix the dry ingredients together in a stand mixer. Add just enough milk for the dough to come together. Add the eggs and the butter little by little after about 4 minutes. Mix on low speed for about 15 minutes to develop an elastic dough. Transfer to an oiled container, cover and rest until double in size, for about an hour to one hour and a half at room temp.

Mix together the fine caster sugar with the spices. When the dough has risen, deflate it gently and shape into a cylinder. When the dough resists, give it a few minutes rest before you continue. Cut up the doughroll in small pieces, deliberately uneven in size and shape. Toss the dough pieces in the sugar and place in the oiled tin. They will expand considerably; loosely spread the first layer around your BIG (improv) monkey bread pan.

Scoop the cooled down chestnut-mincemeat over the first layer of dough, and then cover with a second layer of sugared dough bits. Cover and let proof untill the dough has puffed up.

Preheat the oven to 180° C. Heat the butter with the brown sugar and gently pour this over the proofed dough.

Bake for about 35 minutes, turning it halfway into the bake to ensure even browning. Be careful with the top; don't let it burn!

After the bake, let the bread cool for about 10 minutes before inverting the monkey bread onto a rack. Leave to cool completely before slicing.

Enjoy! You can really do me a big favor by endorsing the BreadLab initiative. Every 'like' will get us closer to funding a 6 episode documentary on 'the best bread in the world'. Thank you in advance!

Freerk

espinocm's picture
espinocm

This was my bread project last weekend. I really enjoyed making it and it was delicious! I slightly modified the recipe found here. I didn’t do the sponge; I added the sponge measurements to the dough ingredients and halved it. Next time I will omit the red pepper from the herb & cheese mixture (the following includes the adjustment). Here is what I did:


Dough:


2 ½ tsp. Fleischmann's RapidRise yeast


3 - 4 ¼ cups all purpose flour


1 tsp fine sea salt


1 tsp black pepper


1 Tbsp Italian seasoning


1 ½ tsp garlic powder


½ tsp crushed red pepper


1 Tbsp parmesan cheese, grated


1 Tbsp plus 1 ½ tsp olive oil


¾ - 1 ½ cup water (3/4 didn’t seem like enough. I ended up adding 1 ½ but it was a little too much, next time will try 1 cup)


Mix together yeast and water in a stand mixer bowl. Let set for 5 minutes. Add remaining ingredients (starting with 3 cups of flour) and mix on low speed until combined. Add more flour as needed until dough is soft and slightly sticky. Knead on medium-low speed for 5 minutes. Let rise 1 ½ - 2 hours or until doubled in size.


Herb and Cheese Mixture:


1 cup mixed cheeses (I used Asiago, Parmesan, Romano and Provolone. Truth be known, it was probably more than a cup because the more cheese the better, right? :-)


¼ cup parsley, chopped (I used a combination of fresh and dried)


½ large onion, chopped


2 ½ cloves garlic, minced


¼ cup sundried tomatoes, chopped


1 Tbsp plus 1 ½ tsp Italian seasoning


½ tsp garlic powder


1 ½ tsp black pepper


1 tsp sea salt


1 ½ tsp dried oregano


1 Tbsp pesto


1 ½ tsp truffle oil


1 Tbsp olive oil


Combine all ingredients in a bowl. Mix well, breaking up any chunks.


Assemble and Bake:


Lightly sprayed Bundt pan with non-stick spray (probably not necessary since it’s a non-stick pan and you do drizzle olive oil over the top which runs down the sides)


The original recipe states to roll out the dough but I just stretched the dough out a little on a floured surface and cut into equal pieces with scissors. I covered the pieces with herb & cheese mixture, rolled into balls and put in pan until all the dough was used.



Let rise for 1 hour.



Preheat oven to 400 degrees during last 30 minutes of rise.


Drizzle tops with olive oil. Bake for 25-35 minutes or until browned and crispy on the outside.





 

chouette22's picture
chouette22

Finally I am finding (or rather taking) the time to post about my recent baking activities. And since I am still on vacation, but the semester starts next week, I'd better not rely on having more leisure then...


I have baked quite a bit with my sourdough starter (which is now about 4 months old, but has already spent five weeks straight in the fridge when I was in Switzerland - seems to have survived it well) and we all love the resulting breads. Here are some examples:


The classic Vermont Sourdough (Hamelman):



Susan from San Diego's "Original Sourdough":



Sourdough Walnut and Sultana Bread (recipe by Shiao-Ping):



This bread was absolutely delightful. I put all kinds of dried fruit (the big black spots you see are prunes). The only change I will make next time is to include a tiny amount of sweetness, a spoon or two of honey probably.


Pain de Provence (Floyd's recipe; herb bread, no sourdough):



Delicious! I made it with all sorts of fresh herbs from the garden, chopped very finely.


King Arthur's Monkey Bread (no sourdough):



By the time I got the camera, the kids with the visiting neighbour kids had already torn into it ...


And for good measure, two desserts.


Blueberry Pie with fresh Michigan berries:



And finally, Eclairs filled with Vanilla Pudding and fresh strawberries. They certainly didn't last long!



 


As I said in my introduction, I LOVE a certain Swiss bread and have been trying to recreate some kind of copy of the patented original. I'll do a separate post on how that is coming along.


 


 

Subscribe to RSS - Monkey bread