The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

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Chaze215's picture

Dough math

June 25, 2012 - 6:45pm -- Chaze215
Forums: 

I have used the following recipe for pizza/strombolis/calzones etc...

4 cups bread flour, 1 3/4 cups water, 2 1/4 tsp yeast, 1 1/2 tsp salt and 2 tbl olive oil.

So I tried to convert those measurements into grams as best as I could and come up with a formula. Is this correct?

4 cups (520 grams), 1 3/4 cups water (432 grams), 2 1/4 tsp yeast (10 grams), salt (9 grams) So.....

Bread flour 100%, water 83%, yeast 2% and salt 1.7%

MIchael_O's picture

An all round baking calculator

August 1, 2010 - 11:39pm -- MIchael_O

Hello guys and girls,


    I am a bit new on this forum, but I wanted to save ya'll some future trouble, by letting you know I just wrote a unique online calculator that calculates hydration, converts between almost anything - for example 4.63 ounces of 125% starter equals how many cups of starter, and has some other functionalities. It is hosted at:


http://www.whatsthesequency.com/cakey.php

mlucas's picture

Calculating Final Dough Hydration from Baker's Percentages

April 27, 2010 - 6:55am -- mlucas

When baking with any type of starter/levain/biga, it seems pretty important to know the final dough hydration of a recipe, as that is a much better way to gauge the feel of the dough than just the base hydration. (especially when a large amount of starter is used)


Of course, if the hydration of the starter matches the hydration of the dough recipe, there's no need to calculate. But usually this is not the case...

flournwater's picture

Bread Dough Formula Math Dilemma (Some Help, I Hope)

December 29, 2009 - 12:57pm -- flournwater
Forums: 

From time to time I read posts with questions like this:


"I want to use 435 grams of starter at 70% hydration in a bread dough formula that calls for 500 grams of flour at 60% hydration.  How do I figure out how much flour and water I need to add in order to meet that requirement?"


Here's a primer that should alleviate the headache you might normally experience trying to figure it out.

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