The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

malted barley flour

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hanseata's picture
hanseata

My first "Equal Opportunity Bread" (see my last post) had to be a batch of rolls. I like having a supply of rolls in my freezer, when we come home from a trip, and want a bread that thaws faster than a large loaf. So I grabbed one of my most favorite baking books - hey, who said I couldn't include my favorites in my fair baking? - "Brot aus Südtirol". Richard Ploner's breads are all small, mini breads, or rolls. The (professional baker's) reasoning: "They should all have the same size in a mixed bread basket".

This baking book has everything going for it, interesting recipes and appetizing photos. Unfortunately, it has not been translated into English, yet. Because of this sad omission I am happy to be able to translate at least some of its wonderful recipes for English speaking bakers.

The one thing I always change - apart for an adaptation of the ingredients to what is available in the US - are the very short fermentation times. Ploner doesn't retard his doughs, but I do, and I am sure that even these nice breads benefit from it.

The original recipe lists sugar caramel color (15 g) - I didn't have it and didn't see a real need for it, either. Richard Ploner lets you choose between toasted soy flakes and pumpkin seeds - for me a no-brainer, since I love toasted pumpkin seeds, and buy them in bulk. The sesame seeds I toasted, too, to enhance their "nuttiness".

 

MALZBROT - TYROLEAN MALT RYE ROLLS WITH SESAME AND PUMPKIN SEEDS

6 g instant yeast
280 g water, lukewarm
300 g all-purpose flour
100 g medium rye flour
100 g whole wheat flour
5 g malted barley flour (non diastatic)
5 g sugar (1 tsp.)
6 g sesame seeds, toasted (2 tsp.)
50 g pumpkin seeds, toasted, chopped
3 g whole caraway seeds (1 tsp.)
10 g salt


DAY 1:

1. Dissolve instant yeast in warm water. Mix with other dough ingredients to form a rough ball, 1 - 2 minutes on low speed (or with a wooden spoon). Let dough rest for 5 minutes.


2. Knead on medium-low speed (or by hand) for 2 minutes, adjusting with water, if needed (dough should be a bit sticky). Continue kneading for 4 more minutes, the last 20 seconds at medium-high speed (dough should still be more sticky than tacky).


3. Transfer dough to lightly floured work bench, and, with wet or oiled hands, stretch into a rough square, fold like a business letter, and then fold again like a business letter from the short sides. Tuck sides under dough to shape a ball, and place in oiled bowl, seam side down. Cover, and let rest for 10 minutes.


4. Repeat S & F for 3 more times at 10 minute intervals (total time 40 minutes). After the last fold, place into oiled container, cover, and refrigerate overnight.


DAY 2:

5. Remove dough from refrigerator 2 hours before using, it should have doubled in size (or shape cold, with then longer rising time).


6. Preheat oven to 428ºF/220ºC, including steam pan. Divide dough into 10 equal pieces. Pre-shape into rounds. Let relax for 5 minutes.


7. With both hands, roll rounds into 10-cm/4" long strands, with tapered ends. Place, seam side down, on parchment lined baking sheet. Score lengthwise. Mist with oil spray, cover, and let rise for 45 - 60 minutes, or until they have grown ca. 1 1/2 times their original size.


8. Bake for 12 minutes, steaming with 1 cup of boiling water. Rotate rolls, remove steam pan, and continue baking for another 13 minutes, until they are golden brown. Leave in switched-off oven with door slightly ajar for 5 more minutes, then let cool on a wire rack.

Malzbrot - These rolls went straight into Karin's Bread Hall of Fame - they are soooo good!

 

Aivaras's picture
Aivaras

Hello all, my name is Aivaras. Long story short, more than half year ago i decided to try baking bread, or at least something resembling bread, because I've never baked anything, and then i found TFL. I want to thank all members on TFL, because almost everything i learned i learned from here. I'm starting blog to post some of my older bakes and to try to post after i bake something.


This is Boule (baked on 5/02) i probably would not have baked, except that I made mistake when preparing starter for my weekly bake of Gerard Rubaud bâtards. I was preparing last build for starter and accidentally ended with 100% hydration starter which i decided to refrigerate shortly after mixing. While it was staying in refrigerator, I saw breadbakingbass post and since I had Malted Barley flour which i never tried to use, i thought to give it a try.



Formula:


200g T150 Organic stone ground flour


400g T80 flour


260g T55 flour


100g Organic Malted Barley flour


240g Liquid Levain


24g Salt


580g Warm Water


Total - 1.8Kg; Hydration - 65%


Method:


Mix starter 1:2:2 ratio (GR flour mix: 70% T55, 18% T150, 9% T80 spelt, 3% T160 rye) leave 20 minutes and then refrigerate for 48 hours.


After 48 hours dissolve starter in water, mix only with T150 and Malted Barley flour, cover tightly and leave at 25C for 45 minutes.


After 45 minutes mix half of left flour and leave for 20 minutes, then mix rest flour and leave for another 20 minutes.


Add salt and mix for few minutes.


Ferment at 25C for 2 hours.


Lightly shape into boule, place in lined basket and proof for 2 hours.


Preheat oven at 250C, Bake for 50 min at 230C with steam for 15 min.


breadbakingbassplayer's picture
breadbakingbass...

Hey All,


Just wanted to let you know that I found a place that carries malted barley flour in NYC.  I haven't checked the other markets that I usually go to, ie: Fairway, Whole Foods.  I found this at the Korean Market "Han Ah Reum" on 32nd Street between Broadway and 5th Avenue in Koreatown.  It is the Choripdong brand.  They also have malted barley that's crushed.  It's $4.99 for 2lbs. 


Tim



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