The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

long fermentation

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Moya Gray's picture
Moya Gray

I've been learning and lurking on the site for about a year now and have learned so much from all of you!  Thank you!

Here are pictures of the latest bread I've made, a long fermentation wholewheat-rye sourdough.

 

 

Here is the crumb shot:

I'm really happy with this recipe which is as follows:

100 G whole wheat flour

100 G rye flour

200 G bread flour

100 G all purpose flour

105 G starter (100% hydration)

20 G salt

300 G water

I mixed and, rather than autolyse at this point, I tried some stretch & folds, but found it way too sticky....so I wet my hands several times and it was easier to do the S&F (but it was more like kneading than the usual S&F with a higher hydration dough).  I continued the S&F for about 30+ minutes, covered it with tin foil and left it on the counter (72 degrees F) for 7.5 hours and went to sleep.  The next morning I then shaped the dough and let it rise for 45 minutes.  I baked it at 450 degrees F for 20 minutes with steam throughout the entire 20 minute period (cast iron pan with a towel and water).  The crumb is very moist, as if it had been a higher hydration dough, and rather sweet-nutty tasting.  I really like the flavor of this one!  Any suggestions for improving this?

4akitchenblog's picture
4akitchenblog

I LOVE wine.

I drink wine every single day.

And, I am addicted to baking bread....

Why not!?

My favorite combination : Wine + Bread = Yum :-)

I added chopped cranberries, too.

Sourdough Wine Baguette & Batard 

Thanks to wine and cranberry, it has a nice sweet and tangy flavor and definitely goes well with blue cheese!

I can't stop drinking & eating wine!

———————————————————————

Sourdough - Wine Baguette + Batard

Makes 1 baguettes and 2 small batards

—————————————-

Ingredients

102 g 100% hydration starter

287.8 g Gold Medal All-purpose Flour

80 g Water

123 g Red Wine

6.7 g Salt

80 g Dried Cranberries

—————————————-

Formula

338.8 g Gold Medal All-purpose Flour (100%)

 131 g Water (38.6%)

123 g Red Wine (36.3%)

6.7 g Salt (1.98%)

80 g Dried Cranberries  (23.6%)

—————————————-

Directions

  1. In a bowl, mix flour and Wine + Water roughly, cover it with plastic and Autolyse for 12 hours in the fridge.
  2. Add Sourdough starter and mix by folding dough in the bowl.
  3. Add chopped Cranberries and mix by folding dough in the bowl.
  4. Add Salt and Slap & Fold for 3 - 4 minutes or until the dough becomes a ball.
  5. Bulk fermentation at room temperature, 1 sets Stretch & Fold (1 set = right over left, left over right, bottom over the top, top over bottom) every half hour until enough strength has been developed.
  6. Let it rise until the dough starts showing the 'activity' and becomes about a third in size. It takes about 6 hours total in winter time (it depends on the season) in my kitchen.
  7. Put it in the fridge for 16 – 18 hours.
  8. Pull it out of the fridge and leave it out for 1 hour.
  9. Divide into 2 equal parts and preshape the dough.
  10. Let it rest for 15 - 30 minutes.
  11. Shape into baguettes / batards and place onto a floured couche, seam-side up.
  12. Preheat the oven to 500°F
  13. Final fermentation for 45 minutes - 1 hour.
  14. Score the top of the baguettes / batards using a lame or a sharp, serrated knife.
  15. Place the bread in the preheated oven, pour the water onto the brick blocks and shut the oven door immediately. Turn down the oven to 480°F, bake the bread around 20 minutes.
  16. Let them cool onto a rack.
  17. Ready to eat!

The time and temperature will be changed depends on the season.

 

 

4akitchenblog's picture
4akitchenblog

Hi all,

I am new here and this is my first post on The Fresh Loaf!

Today I would like to share my first attempt at baking Sourdough Boule with Japanese Clay Pot.

Japanese Clay Pot (a.k.a. Donabe) is a symbol of comfort food for Japanese people.

(Oh, by the way, I am Japanese :-))

Family members or friends come together around the table and share a meal out of one pot, so that you can build a sense of closeness, warmness...

I live in Santa Monica, California and my all family members live in Japan...Therefore, I felt all warm inside when I happened to find this Donabe.

"I want to bake BREAD with this clay pot!"

This idea just popped in my head :-)

 

The best part of using a clay pot (of course, a cast-iron pan, too) is you don't need to create the steam in your oven.

Because a closed clay pot trap all of the moisture from the dough, and that creates STEAM you need to get a perfect crust!

It's like a "masonry oven" inside your oven, if you will.

 

Ok, let's bake Donabe-bread!

This is a Sourdough Boule made with 36 hours fermentation.

————————————

Sourdough Boule

Makes 1 small loaf

Submitting this post to YeastSpotting

————————————

Recipe

225 g Bread flour

162 g water

4 g Salt

67.5 g 60% Firm sourdough starter

————————————

Formula

266.3 g Bread Flour (100%)

188.3 g Water (70%)

4.8 g Salt (1.8% )

————————————

Directions

1. Making the preferment dough --- In a mixing bowl, combine Bread Flour, Water and Sourdough seed starter / culture. 

    Let it preferment at room temperature for 12 hours.

2. Meanwhile, mix flour and water, cover it with plastic and Autolyse for for 12 hours.

3. Next day, mix starter into the dough and slap & fold for 1 minute.

4. Add salt and slap & fold for 1 minute or until the dough becomes a rough ball.

5. Let it rest for  30 minutes.

6. 1 set Stretch & Fold (1 set = right over left, left over right, bottom over top, top over bottom)

7. Let it rest for  30 minutes.

8. 1 set Stretch & Fold

9. Let it rest for  30 minutes.

10. 1 set Stretch & Fold

11. At a cooler place, let it rise until the dough just starts showing the yeast activity, about a third in size.

12. Put it in the fridge for 18-24 hours.

13. Pull it out of the fridge and leave it out for 1 hour.

14. Pre-shape the dough and let it rest for 15 minutes.

15. Shape into Boule and place into a mixing bowl lined with well-floured tea towel, seam-side up.

❉ Since I didn't have a round banneton, I used a mixing bowl lined with a tea towel and it just worked very well!

16. Final fermentation for 60 - 90 minutes.

17. 1 hour before you plan to bake, place your Donabe / Closed clay pot (must be completely DRY) on the middle shelf in the oven and preheat to 500°F.

 

18. Flip the bowl over so that the dough sits on the middle of a parchment paper.

19. Score the top of the Boule using a lame or a sharp, serrated knife.

20. Very very carefully open the lid (it's HOT!) and put the bread in the preheated Donabe, replace the lid and slip it back into the oven.

21. Turn the heat down to 480°F and bake the bread for 30 minutes with lid.

22. Turn the heat down to 450°F and bake for 10-15 minutes without lid.

23. Once the boule is nicely brown, turn the heat off and remove the boule from the Donabe and place directly on a rack in the oven for another 5-10 minutes.

24. Let them cool onto a rack.

Here is my first Donabe-Bread!

It turned out super nice! I got an amazing crust and silky-fluffy-holey crumb.

To be honest, I was quite surprised by this result. 

Even though I knew this "closed clay pot (La Cloche)" method through this post on a website BREAD IN FIVE,

I was not sure if I could get the same result with this Japanese Donabe or not...

No baking stone? No steam? Really?!

Yes, it really works! Donabe-bread is a new comfort food for me!

Yuko



anemic's picture

Seeking recipe ideas for a long acidic fermentation sourdough

January 22, 2010 - 5:58am -- anemic

Loafers,


I have done much research on TFL and all over the web (two weeks)and I am not seeing the solution to my quest. I have the Hamelman bread book on reserve at the library and I hope it will teach me a lot about how to design a proper recipe, as I see it is often referred to on TFL & elsewhere by skilled bakers. 

DownStateBaker's picture
DownStateBaker

Sorry for the delay. I thought I would have a chance to post day two right away. I am now in day three of the creation of the starter. So let's catch up!


Day 2



This is how my starter looked at 30 hours from the initial mix of 300g flour 300g water. I stirred it 5 times over the 30 hours. In the first 12 hours i had left the bowl, covered, on my pellet stove. It got up to 90 F, this was initially thought of as a mistake by me. So I moved the bowl to somewhere at room temp. Then over the next 28 hours it was alive with activity so awesome. So hopefully over the 30 hours you've seen activity similar to what is shown above. If it takes more time than 30 its ok, this is what you want it to look similar too before going on to the next step.


Feeding


You should have 600g of starter mix. Take 300g of this mix, add 150g of flour, and 150g water. I had just poured a glass of a nice weizen-bock and mixed the water with the yeast sediment in the bottle. I figured the more the merrier, yeast wise. Then mixed it up until well combined (No chunks of dry flour). To look like this.



Day 3



Here is how it looked at around 12pm today before I mixed it up again (not adding anything). Updates to come

Stephanie Brim's picture
Stephanie Brim

So here we are...baking again. Thank God. Seriously. Grocery store bread really does suck. Eating that crap through my entire pregnancy almost killed me. Since the bouncing baby boy is now sleeping a lot better than before, baking once again commences.


Eric's Fave Rye


This was a riff on Eric's Fave Rye. I forgot the sugar and caraway so it isn't really right. I plan on making it again.


My Daily Bread


This was my final formula for my everyday, I-need-something-tasty-that-I-can-be-lazy-with bread. The write-up on my new and improved blog is on my new and improved blog.


Next up I'm hoping to tackle San Joaquin Sourdough and some bagels. All this week.


Maybe a little too ambitious?

LLM777's picture

Cold fermentation vs. room temp fermentation ?

June 7, 2009 - 8:13pm -- LLM777
Forums: 

Sometimes I see recipes using room temp fermentation for 12-24 hours and other times I see cold fermentation for 12-72 hours. Is there a benefit to using a specific one or is it a matter of preference? I mainly bake with freshly ground whole grains and am wondering if one way will work better than another, and do they achieve the same results or different?


Thank you.


 


 

JMonkey's picture
JMonkey

I was concerned that my success with the whole grain hearth bread that I posted about early last month was just a one-hit wonder. Thankfully, it seems I can repeat it. Here's a few loaves that have come out of the oven in the past weeks:







I've also used the same technique for a 60-40 whole wheat to whole rye batard, and it, too, turned out well, though the crumb was, naturally, much tighter than in the loaves pictured here. I'd have taken pictures, but the camera was full and, by the time I got around to downloading them off of the camera's video card, the loaf was just a little nubbin.

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