The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

levain

RonRay's picture
RonRay

Yeast Water Examples with Photos TFL Links Only [Updated: 110605-0720]

This is a follow up on my Yeast Water & Other Wee Beastie Bubbles (No Math) posting at the link below:

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/23441/yeast-water-amp-other-wee-beastie-bubbles-no-math

 

I wanted to provide an easy way, for those interested, to find visual examples of what has been done by TFL members using Yeast Water Levain (YWL).

The intent is to list links to any TFL posting that meets two criteria:

1/ The baked item used Yeast Water (YW) as one of the levains, and

2/ The posting shows some photographic material of the baked item.

 

I have searched the TFL index, and have gone through Threads, which I thought might have such postings/comments with in them. There is no intent to exclude any material that meets the two criteria given above. Therefore, if you know of any existing posting not list below, that meets the criteria, please, provide me with the link, and I will attempt to add it to this index. This is not intended to be a continually updated posting, however, for those new postings in the very near future, I will try to get them added, as well – if they are reported to me.

There are 17 categories – 15 Yeast Water type groups, 1 group of mixed &or unclear types, and the first category which is not the baking, but rather the making of YW or YWL.

 

Within each category, I have tried to list them from oldest down to the most recent. I hope no one finds it odd that many of the examples are my own postings, but the world does have those who get upset by nearly everything.

 

01 *** Making YW &or YWL...

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/6012/baking-natural-wild-yeast-water-not-sourdough

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/20460/banana-saga-%E9%95%B7%E7%AF%87%E6%95%85%E4%BA%8B#comment-142706

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/20460/banana-saga-%E9%95%B7%E7%AF%87%E6%95%85%E4%BA%8B#comment-142813

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/23719/time-lapse-video-apricot-yw-levain

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/23809/how-i-make-and-maintain-raisin-yeast-water

02 *** Apple YW examples...

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/20460/banana-saga-%E9%95%B7%E7%AF%87%E6%95%85%E4%BA%8B#comment-143250

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/20693/culturing-growing-and-baking-range-wild-yeasts#comment-143857

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/20693/culturing-growing-and-baking-range-wild-yeasts#comment-145005

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/20693/culturing-growing-and-baking-range-wild-yeasts#comment-145082

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/20693/culturing-growing-and-baking-range-wild-yeasts#comment-146554

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/21251/bread-who-grew-horn-or-apple-yeast-gone-wild

03 *** Apricot YW examples...

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/23752/apricot-yeast-water-test-loaf

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/23816/apricot-yeast-water-pullman-loaf

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/23818/survival-fittest-pt-2-raisin-yw-wins

04 *** Blueberry YW examples...

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/23676/fruitfed-yeast-adventuremadness#comment-170888

05 *** Cherry YW examples...

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/23676/fruitfed-yeast-adventuremadness#comment-170888

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/23818/survival-fittest-pt-2-raisin-yw-wins

06 *** Clementine YW examples...

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/20460/banana-saga-%E9%95%B7%E7%AF%87%E6%95%85%E4%BA%8B#comment-143000

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/20460/banana-saga-%E9%95%B7%E7%AF%87%E6%95%85%E4%BA%8B#comment-143153

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/20693/culturing-growing-and-baking-range-wild-yeasts#comment-144440

 07 *** Lemon YW examples...

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/20693/culturing-growing-and-baking-range-wild-yeasts#comment-146895

 08 *** Mixed or Type-Unsure YW examples...

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/6012/baking-natural-wild-yeast-water-not-sourdough#comment-32470

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/20460/banana-saga-%E9%95%B7%E7%AF%87%E6%95%85%E4%BA%8B#comment-143159

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/20693/culturing-growing-and-baking-range-wild-yeasts#comment-143785

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/20693/culturing-growing-and-baking-range-wild-yeasts#comment-145327

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/20693/culturing-growing-and-baking-range-wild-yeasts#comment-145701

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/20693/culturing-growing-and-baking-range-wild-yeasts#comment-146231

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/20693/culturing-growing-and-baking-range-wild-yeasts#comment-146950

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/21104/my-first-panettone-milanese

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/23348/my-japanese-sandwich-loaf

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/23379/cuban-bread-japanese-sandwich-starterliquid-yeast

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/23440/raisin-water-yeast#comment-169592

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/23519/bread-who-grew-horn-or-apple-yeast-gone-wild#comment-170137

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/23613/liquid-yeast-sourdough

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/23615/strawberry-pocky-my-version-mixed-fruit-yeast-water

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/23440/raisin-water-yeast#comment-170489

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/23440/raisin-water-yeast#comment-170580

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/23694/standard-kiss-loaf-or-keep-it-simple-smiley

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/23440/raisin-water-yeast#comment-171399

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/23779/survival-fittest-%E2%80%93-which-fruit-yeast-water-keep

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/23818/survival-fittest-pt-2-raisin-yw-wins

09 *** Peach YW examples...

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/23708/search-offlavor-peachy-boule#comment-171159

10 *** Potato YW examples...

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/23793/potato-yeast-water-pullman-loaf-shorty

11 *** Prune YW examples...

 http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/20693/culturing-growing-and-baking-range-wild-yeasts#comment-145016

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/20693/culturing-growing-and-baking-range-wild-yeasts#comment-145570

12 *** Raisin YW examples...

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/6012/baking-natural-wild-yeast-water-not-sourdough#comment-31414

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/20693/culturing-growing-and-baking-range-wild-yeasts#comment-146574

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/20693/culturing-growing-and-baking-range-wild-yeasts#comment-146735

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/20693/culturing-growing-and-baking-range-wild-yeasts#comment-146880

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/20693/culturing-growing-and-baking-range-wild-yeasts#comment-147134

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/23593/david039s-miche-raisin-yeast-water

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/23726/thank-you-syd

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/23818/survival-fittest-pt-2-raisin-yw-wins

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/23440/raisin-water-yeast#comment-172317

13 *** Rice YW examples...

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/20693/culturing-growing-and-baking-range-wild-yeasts#comment-147023

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/20693/culturing-growing-and-baking-range-wild-yeasts#comment-147096

14 *** Strawberry YW examples...

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/23440/raisin-water-yeast#comment-169026

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/23440/raisin-water-yeast#comment-169740

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/23440/raisin-water-yeast#comment-170434

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/23676/fruitfed-yeast-adventuremadness#comment-170888

 15 *** Tea YW examples...

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/6012/baking-natural-wild-yeast-water-not-sourdough#comment-31954

16 *** Tomato YW examples...

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/23680/tomato-pretzel-yeast-water-raisin-yeast-water-used#comment-170927

17 *** Yogurt YW examples...

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/20693/culturing-growing-and-baking-range-wild-yeasts#comment-145564

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/20693/culturing-growing-and-baking-range-wild-yeasts#comment-145610

 

Ron

MarieH's picture
MarieH

I finally purchased Jeffrey Hamelman’s Bread. I have been resisting buying another cookbook but the constant references to Bread wore me down. I am now a convert. I took a few days to read the book and found myself saying “I didn’t know that” and “Wow” many times.

I decided to start with the Vermont Sourdough recipe, but since I live in Tallahassee, my levain is southern.  I created a sourdough (levain) culture in January and it is maintaining very well.  I am thrilled with the bread results - the flavor and texture is great. I also made a semolina loaf that is pictured with the two batards. The scoring on the front batard was too shallow. Even though I am fairly experienced with artisanal bread making, scoring still intimidates me.  I hold my breath and slash with minimal confidence.

Back to Hamelman’s book – if you are holding back because you don’t need another bread book, buy it anyway. I have learned about dough temperature, mixing times, and preshaping to name a few things. Because I live in Florida, my kitchen is always warm. I didn’t know I need to start with chilled water to get a proper dough temp (there’s a formula!). The book is written for professional bakers and home bakers and is very helpful for people who want to improve their bread baking skills and end product.

Here are my pictures. And thanks to everyone for being my bread baking neighbors. I value your friendship and willingness to share your bread baking journey.     ~Marie

 

 

Juergen Krauss's picture

Vermont (or WhereEver) Sourdough side by side

May 11, 2011 - 1:07pm -- Juergen Krauss

Studying Hanelman's book Bread I wondered about the differences in taste of the diverse wheat levains and sourdoughs.

As a home baker I usually do one batch at a time, and by the time I bake another formula I might have forgotten the subtle characteristics.

Today I had the idea to make 2 batches - one Vermont Sourdough (p153, VS for reference), and one Vermont Sourdough with Increased Whole Grain (p156, call it IS).

Of each batch I made 2x 500g boules and 2x 250g batards, and the remaining dough I combined in a kind of double-fendu:

RuthieG's picture
RuthieG

Last night I made a starter for cuban bread to bake today as well as the liquid yeast levain for Japanese Sandwich bread. 

 

I expected to see the cuban bread starter way up the sides of the container this morning as it contained 3/4 tsp of regular yeast.  I also expected a good result from the liquid fruit yeast after sitting all night on the counter even though our home is very cool..... 

 

The result was that the liquid fruit starter far out preformed the regular yeast.  It was a beautiful sight to see......I think my liquid yeast must be a very good batch.  I wish I had taken a picture of it so you could see but perhaps I will make another batch just for picture taking.

 

Here is a picture of my refrigerated liquid fruit yeast.  It doesn't appear clear in the picture but it is a pinkish clear liquid and is made up of dried raisins, dried cranberries, grapes and apple skins and cores.  It is very active and I store it in a very cold spot in my fridge.  I am anxious to see how today's bread turns out.  The yeasted Cuban loafs are far ahead of the two at the moment.  I have already proofed them and made baguettes after the first rise.

 

Here is a shot of my Cuban bread.....It will soon be time to go into the oven.  I made it to my own shape....Not as thick and Batardish as Miami bread and not as slender and elongated as Tampa bread. Since this picture was taken, I have inserted a piece of water soaked white cotton cord across the top of each one......

 

 

 

The finished bread......out of the oven at internal temp of 200 degrees. 

 

 

alexandrut03's picture

Starter - feed

April 26, 2011 - 12:14pm -- alexandrut03

Hello again!

My starters are just great! Ok, but there's a little problem.... I feed 'em twice daily... and there's a lot of waste .. .A LOT! ) aprox. 600 grams of flour, just for my feedings). If I switch the feeding routine on 24h, will I lose quality?

Thanks! (again, as always, excuse my English)

Onceuponamac's picture
Onceuponamac

Still would like to get better oven spring - but happy with these nonetheless.

Juergen Krauss's picture
Juergen Krauss

WARNING - This post contains some disturbing bread images!

 

First of all - I trust my liquid rye starter. He hasn't got a name yet, but I trust him.

 

Last Sunday we were having some friends over, some with wheat intolerance, and I decided to make the 100% russian rye (from Bread Matters), that always works, I thought.

And I had made a few nice batches of Hamelman's levain with wholewheat, and somehow the Polish Rye we made on the baking course I recently visited felt not so far from that, and I could make it with my rye starter.

Great.

I took the starter out of the fridge the day before where it had been for some weeks, taste and smell OK, and made my pre-ferments.

 

The stiff pre-ferment for the levain was coming along a bit sluggishly, but the liquid one for the russian rye had some bubbles soon (although not enough bubbles, in retrospect).

I expected to make some levain loaves like these from an earlier batch:

good levain

Good oven spring, nice open crumb, delicious ...

 

Well, now come the images... You have been warned, I am not responsible for your bad dreams.

 

 

 

They all tasted delicious.

But ...

bad levain

This is the levain. The top loaf proved for 3.5 hours at 26C. Seriously underproofed.

I didn't trust my finger test!

I will use this one for experiments with old bread.

The bottom loaf prooved for 9 hours. Great taste, crumb not ideal.

With the Russian Rye I expected no problems, but it rose very slowly.

Well,

The photo speaks for itself ...

After 11 hours the dough had risen to a level I expected (usually it takes half that time) and I baked it.

bad russian rye

 

My starter was simply starved, and I didn't pay attention to the warning signs.

As I said, I trust my starter, still.

Currently he is being pampered with some fresh flour ...

 

Happy baking,

Juergen

 

Franko's picture
Franko

The loaf in the photo above is from a formula of my own that I've been playing around with for weeks now, trying to get a result I could live with. Finally after several previous unsatisfactory bakes, this latest attempt produced something close to the loaf I've been trying for from the beginning. The bread is a Country Style Rye with a mixed grain soaker and a levain, so nothing that hasn't been done before in many ways over many years by other bakers. Last week I made the dough and baked it in the Dutch Oven, and although it tasted fine I wasn't thrilled with the appearance. Photo below of last weeks effort.

The scoring was poor and it spread too much from what I believe was a combination of too long a final rise and too much initial steam generated from baking in the DO. That's my best analysis at any rate. The other problem was the formulation itself, which needed multiple tweaks to bump up the overall flavour, as well as the percentage of levain, which I'd originally had far too low . With the help of a spreadsheet I'd managed to put together a few weeks prior, adjusting the formulation was a quick and easy process compared to doing it the old way. More about the spreadsheet further down.

This latest bake went fairly well compared to the last, getting a good even jump in the oven, with the slashing opening up nicely minus any unsightly splitting or tearing. The colour is a bit darker than I'd prefer but with the high hydration of this loaf I thought it best to bake it as boldly as possible. The crumb is moist, dense, and flavourful, having what I'd call a medium sour tang to it. It's certainly a work in progress but it's getting there somewhat.

 

Making a bread formulation spreadsheet was something I'd promised myself to take a stab at sometime this year, having seen what a useful calculator they can be for adjusting formulae or quantities quickly and accurately, from using a few that my friend breadsong,http://www.thefreshloaf.com/user/breadsong had sent me late last year to try out. Being a complete newbie to this sort thing, it was a bit of a tough go in the beginning, but fortunately I had lots of expert guidance from breadsong while I plodded my way up the learning curve of making this spreadsheet . I can't thank her enough for all the tips and guidance she shared so generously with me throughout this project. This is just a very simple spreadsheet that calculates a desired final dough weight based on percentages. It's been formatted to look as close to a typical recipe layout as possible so that people who are unfamiliar with using a spreadsheet will hopefully find it easy to use. For anyone wanting something with a lot more functions and input, this one of mine will disappoint, but here's a link to Dolph's sheet that looks like it will do just about anything you could want.

http://www.starreveld.com/Baking/index.html .

Another one you might try is from joshuacronemeyer's recent post of his nifty Dough Hydration Calculator.

 http://joshuacronemeyer.github.com/Flour-and-Water/

For those who'd like to try out this one of mine, the sheet for the formula as well as the procedure are available through links at the bottom of this post. Please note that the spreadsheet file is only available by downloading it from the links provided. No email requests please. The links will take you to a Google Docs page that shows the spreadsheet with the recipe. You can use the recipe as is from the G Docs page or you can download your own copy of the file in either Excel or Open Office by clicking on 'File' , 'Download as', then select a file format (for most people it will be Excel) and it will download a functioning copy of the spreadsheet . Now it can be used by inputting your own desired dough weight in the yellow shaded cell, or change any of the numbers in the green shaded cells of the percentage column to suit your preference. The format can be saved as a template and used for other formulas as well.

Best Wishes,

Franko

Below are links to the sheet and the procedure

https://spreadsheets.google.com/ccc?key=0AjicIp92YPCTdHRDZTJmTm4zamxPM3JZWmJYVUZ0WVE&hl=en&authkey=CMDqqDM

 

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1SlOG7r_cdHlHEn0YwB0GgwhaCGSIgpjyPqpiDmu56Eo/edit?hl=en&authkey=CL2S_bEO#

 

 

 

 

 

Syd's picture
Syd

 

Levain

30g starter @ 100% hydration

60g whole wheat flour

60g water

Allow to ripen 8 - 12 hours.

 

Final Dough

150g levain

275g water

450g bread flour

80g dried longan

8g salt

 

Mix together levain, water and flour.  Autolyse 50 mins.  Knead in salt.  Finally knead in chopped dried longan.  Bulk ferment for about two and a half hours with folds at 50 and 100 mins respectively.  This turned out to be a strong dough and probably didn't need the second fold.  Divide in two. Preshape.  Rest 20 mins.  Shape into batards.  Final proof, two and a half to three hours.  Slash.  Bake with steam for 20 mins at 230C and without steam at 200C (convection) for another 20 mins.


Dried longans are expensive and I stinted on them.  I should have chopped them up finer, too.  As it was, not every slice had fruit in it or, at least not enough.  I love the taste of dried longan and more is better.  As a result the slices with not enough fruit were bland and now I am already planning the next attempt.  Next time, apart from adding more fruit, I will add some longan syrup to see if that will enhance the flavor even more.

 

Boule

 

150g ripe starter @ 100% hydration

300g water

80g sifted whole wheat

20g rye

350g bread flour

3g diastatic malt

Mix together and autolyse for 50 mins.  Now add:

10g salt

Knead until moderate gluten development. Bulk ferment two and a half hours with folds at 50 and 100 mins respectively.  Pre-shape. Rest 20 mins.  Shape into tight boule.  Allow to proof until three quarters risen.  Retard overnight.  Remove from fridge and allow to complete proof: one to two hours.  Bake on stone @ 230C with steam for 20 mins and @ 200C (convection) without steam for a further 30. Switch off oven, crack oven door open and allow to dry out for a further 5 mins.

 

 

No crumb shot for the boule, yet but will update with one tomorrow.  This is just my standard everyday bread, so I know how this one is going to taste.

Syd

Feb 22:  Crumb shot.

 

Scott Grocer's picture

Help adapt formula for use with levain

February 3, 2011 - 1:38pm -- Scott Grocer

I've got a formula for a nice American style pizza dough that rises in the refrigerator for 24-48 hours, but I was thinking about swapping the instant dry yeast and long ferment for a levain so I could do silly stuff like make same day sub rolls or maybe even soft dinner rolls. Mostly I just wanted something to experiment with.

The problem is that I just can't seem to grasp how to adapt the formula. I was thinking about plugging say, 20% Biga (100% flour, 60% water, 0.2% yeast) into the following formula in place of the IDY:

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