The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

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PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

This past Friday, I taught a class on rye breads at the Culinary Center of Kansas City.  The class was scheduled to run from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.  Three different breads were featured: the rustic pumpernickel from ITJB, Eric's fav rye (compliments of the late Eric Hanner), and a vort limpa.  That gave a nice sampling of the diversity of rye breads.  We were able to bake both the pumpernickel and the vort limpa during class; students then took the dough for Eric's fav rye with them to bake at home.

I had had some concerns about the drawing power of a full-day class on a week day.  As it turned out, all 20 slots were taken, with a waiting list in case of any cancellations.  So, yes, there is enough interest, in spite of the schedule.  No doubt the inclusion of a $20 gift certificate for Pryde's of Westport, a local kitchen supply store, figured favorably, too.

A number of the students were familiar to me from previous classes, which makes for a pleasant time.  Based on what I saw and heard, and what came through on the feedback forms, it was a fun day for the students as well as for me.  Most were new to rye breads and to sourdough, so they were pleased to gain some new experience and to receive some starter to take home to use for future baking.

One of the Center's requirements is that the instructor provide food for the students.  In the case of an evening or half-day class, that is typically something to snack on; usually whatever is being made in the class.  In the case of an all-day class like this one, it is lunch.  It was a no-brainer to plan lunch around the three breads being taught.  That led to cold cuts and condiments and pickles/olives/peppers, with fresh fruit for dessert.  

Consequently, I needed to bake bread ahead of time to have it ready for the lunch of Friday.  That worked well, since it also did double duty as object lesson so that people could see the finished product, too.

If you have baked the rustic pumpernickel from ITJB, you know that it is dark and dense and fragrant with rye.  There's no molasses, coffee, cocoa, or caramel color in it, nor does it have a prolonged bake.  My belief is that the scald contributes strongly to the dark coloring and the moistness of the finished bread.  Then, too, all I can find in local supermarkets is Hodgson Mills stone-ground rye flour, which is pretty hearty stuff in its own right.  Even with heavy steam, the loaf experienced some cracking but no blowouts.

The vort limpa is a party in a compact loaf.  It is redolent of molasses, orange zest/juice, anise, fennel, cardamom, and beer.  With a smear of sweet butter, it's practically dessert.  And it still makes for some darn good sandwiches and toast, too.

Many, many of you have made Eric's fav rye and know that it is a stellar example of a deli-style rye bread.  It makes a magnificent base for a wide range of sandwiches.  While I enjoy the bite of the caraway, my wife often prefers it when I substitute either fennel seeds or dill seeds for the caraway.  No matter how you tweak it, this is a seriously good bread.

With those out of the way, I needed to build up my starter to have sufficient for 21 batches (20 students + 1 instructor demo) of the pumpernickel and Eric's fav rye, plus enough to give away.  That turns out to be a lot of starter.  Really, really, a lot.  Keep in mind that this class was initially planned last summer.  At that time, I was focused more on pulling together the bread descriptions for inclusion in the advertising and the formulae to go into the student's class booklets.  There should have been some thought given to the amount of prep.  I know that now.  Yes, I do.

For instance, this is what all of the scald for the pumpernickel looks like with half of the sponge incorporated.  You can see that it occupies most of one end of my kitchen's island:

The lighting isn't very good; it's all down light from the ceiling and island light fixtures.  There isn't a lot of ambient light at 6 a.m. in January here in Kansas.

This is the second half of the pumpernickel's sponge, ready to mix in with the scald; nothing but rye flour and water, and it smells wonderful!:

Sponge and scald, ready for the final mix (I could have used a big spiral mixer right about now).  Note that the sponge is lighter in color than the scald, even though both are made with the same flour:

Needless to say, it took a number of trips to schlep all of the ingredients from my kitchen to the car, and then again from the car into the teaching kitchen.  I suspect that we will rerun this class at some future date but there may be a change in the lineup that reduces the amount of prep I have to do.

There aren't any photos of the actual class.  I didn't think to grab my camera on the way out the door and there wasn't time to use it, anyway.  

My students were an interesting group.  The youngest may have been in their late 20s or early 30s.  The oldest were, well, older than me and I'm 57.  One couple took a day off from work to attend.  All were alert and inquisitive, with lots of good questions.  We had a lively discussion about how to begin and maintain a starter, which would have been shorter if I hadn't misunderstood a key part of one inquiry.  ;0  During the course of the day, there were a lot of questions about dough consistency and how it was affected by the amount of flour or water people worked into their doughs.  I had talked at length about how sticky some of the doughs would be and not to try to kill the stickiness with flour.  A few still wound up with some stiff doughs that needed more water.  Some students were almost completely new to bread making while others had some good skills.  Tips on shaping and docking and slashing led to another flurry of questions.  These are all areas where the hands-on aspect is hugely valuable, since a book just cannot provide that tactile feedback.

It was very satisfying to share these breads with such an eager group of learners.  And it was a very full day.  I was happy to climb into bed that evening.

Since one student was a no-show, and since I had intentionally made more starter than I expected to use, I wound up making a double batch of Eric's fav rye on Saturday and a double batch of Hamelman's sourdough walnut raisin rye on Sunday.  We have happy friends.

Paul

gmagmabaking2's picture

ITJB FR Week 12 Yeast Raised Donuts pps. 168-170

December 10, 2012 - 6:27pm -- gmagmabaking2
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We 3 sisters fried donuts today! Wow, this is the best donut recipe ever! Really got good rise, easy to fry and glaze or sugar as we all did a variety... Barbra and Helen have been regular baking whirling dervishes... busy, busy with the Holiday things... me, lazy... and just doing the weekly bake, but that is okay... I like having my time to read about what everyone on this website is doing!

Here is how the donuts when down... by the way... these were way to good to keep around, and fresh and hot is how the kids, grands, and neighbors liked them.

gmagmabaking2's picture

ITJB FR Week 11 - Bowties pg. 237

December 3, 2012 - 1:17pm -- gmagmabaking2
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We 3 sisters baked Bowties this morning... what a fast and delicious dough this is... takes a group of eggs, so if you are needing to use some up this is your bake.  These cookies are light and tasty and amazingly addictive.  I can guarantee you that we are going to make these again, and again.

 This is what the first stage of resting looks like. The dough was surprizingly "not sticky", had a good soft, kind of stretchy feel to it.

gmagmabaking2's picture

ITJB FR Week 8 Rugelach pps. 216-17

November 12, 2012 - 1:00pm -- gmagmabaking2
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We 3 sisters baked a variety of Rugelach today. This recipe requires the dough to be made the day before the bake, so it really shortens the amount of time it takes to get to bite down on baking day! We are starting off with Barb's pictures.

  

These look tremendously good. Helen said that she thinks these cookies bring together the flavors of pie crust, churros, and sugar cookies... Barb and I both agree... 

gmagmabaking2's picture

ITJB FR Week 7 Montreal Bagels, pps 100-101

November 6, 2012 - 11:44am -- gmagmabaking2
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We 3 sisters can critique this week's bake with one word! Wow! That one word really describes the dough and the process for making this QUICK bagel, no overnight in the refrigerator, no long, long, rises... from the beginning of the recipe to bite down is less than 3 hours! Great dough, great taste. As per our usual we went different directions on this bake, all converging on a great reward... Yummy Bagels.  Fluffy, soft crust, yet chewy... I know, hard to image chewy and fluffy, but this dough does it.  

gmagmabaking2's picture

ITJB FR Week 6 Onion Kichel pg. 238

October 29, 2012 - 4:35pm -- gmagmabaking2
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We 3 sisters, baked Onion Kichel today... crackers! This was a fun bake and Helen and I stayed with the recipe in the book totally. Our creative oldest sister Barb, put Montreal Steak seasoning and cracked red pepper in hers... Below are the pictures... Fun times, Fun to be doing this together each week. We do spend a good deal of time comparing and contrasting recipes and results. 

gmagmabaking2's picture

ITJB FR Week 5 Barley Bread pps. 87-88

October 23, 2012 - 6:25am -- gmagmabaking2
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This week's challenge bake was the Barley Bread.  This dough was light and smooth and beautiful. The bake went very well and the loaves turned out lovely.  The texture is springy yet dense like a rye bread and the taste is very nice.  I like the "Gershtnbroyt" name for this bread since it is a bit fancier than our daily breads. 

As you can see here Helen's loaves turned out "drop dead gorgeous" her crust was crunchy yet tender and her crumb is very nice. 

Juergen Krauss's picture
Juergen Krauss

Just made the Rich Sourdough Barches from Inside The Jewish Bakery for the first time.

The dough is a bit wetter than I am used to for Challah, but still manageable.

The taste and texture are great!

Thank you, Stan and Norm!

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