The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

honey

ehanner's picture

All About Honey

June 13, 2011 - 1:16pm -- ehanner
Forums: 

I received a message from the National Honey Board today I thought other Fresh Loafers would enjoy seeing. There is a wealth of information about substituting from other sweeteners and a recipe section for a wide variety of baked products. I found it interesting, hope you do too. Everything you wanted to know about natures natural organic sweetener.

Kiint's picture

Wheat Honey Oat Loaf

April 14, 2011 - 5:18pm -- Kiint
Forums: 

Inspired by Subways "Honey Oat" bread, this is my interperetation on the Subway classic.

Ingredients:

 

  • 400g Bread Flour
  • 50g Wheatgerm
  • 75g Semolina Flour
  • 7g Active Yeast (25g fresh)
  • 25g Honey
  • 5g Sugar (rapadura if you have it)
  • 30g Vegetable Shortening
  • 275g Water
  • 5g Salt
  • Oats (topping)
  • Honey wash (equal amount of water and honey, plus a teaspoon of sugar)

 

Process:

Alfie's picture
Alfie

Honey is thought to be a healthy good tasting sweetener.  I have heard that people from India

avoid baking with honey because there is a centuries held idea that heating honey causes it to

become toxic or poisonous in some way.  We have all heard that honey looses some of its healthy

benefits when heated.  We also have heard that heating and processing reduces potential for certain

bacteria.  Our food processing industry tries to make things attractive for the consumer and more

profitable for themselves.  Unheated crystallized honey is not as sellable as the golden almost clear

honey that comes in the squeezable plastic  bear.  In India honey may be thought to be more of a

medicine than a food.  Personally, I substitute rice syrup or sugar, maple syrup etc. when honey is

called for in a recipe that requires heating.  It is a switch for me because when I grew up honey cake

was thought to be a treat. 

 

Any further information will helpful. 

 

Thanks for this exchange of ideas and baking techniques.

 

Neo-Homesteading's picture
Neo-Homesteading

 

 

Recently I watched "how to cook your life" and reviewed it on my blog. The movie really was inspiring for me. I become overwhelmed with a lot of things in daily life and often find that I dont take the time to truly appreciate making the things I enjoy, or even if I make something I enjoy (like bread) I dont really take the time to actually appreciate the process. The perfect partner to that movie was this honey oat bread I made. I found that its perfectly sweet and nutty tasting from the oats. I especially found it delicious left over, toasted in a pan with olive oil and topped with homemade cranberry preserves. 

 

Honey Oat Bread, External Blog Post Link: http://neo-homesteading.blogspot.com/2010/11/sincerity-is-letting-your-imperfections.html

Cranberry Preserves Recipe: http://neo-homesteading.blogspot.com/2010/11/homemade-cranberry-preserves.html

 

teketeke's picture
teketeke

 My husband had been diagnosed with hypoglycemia. The worsest thing is that he has been suffering from panic attack  since he pasted out at the work 3 years ago. I was too silly that I hadn't tried to use 100% whole wheat flour on my recipe. ( My old recipe was 54%(Actually 54.5%)whole wheat bread)  And yet he likes 55% whole wheat bread more than than 85% or 100%.

 

So, this is My 100% whole wheat bread and 85% whole wheat bread and  55% whole wheat bread recipe

(23cm x 10.5cm x 10.5cm) 100% -13cm height and 85% -13-14cm height and 55%- 13-14cm height after baking. 

Note: When you proof the dough too much  before baking, You will have really tall bread, but the top part will be really light.

 

 

    写真 This is 55% whole wheat bread

*Yeast

5.3g

*Warm water  ( 40 or 100F)

180g

*Honey

24g

*Molasses

18g

*2 Egg yolk (L )  +Heavy whipping cream =

To warm up :10seconds in a microwave using normal mode.

80g

*Whole wheat flour for 100% or All purpose flour or bread flour for 85%

#All purpose flour for 55%

*100g

#200g

*Whole wheat flour for 100% and 85%

#whole wheat flour for 55%

*340g

#240g

Salt

8g

Butter

To soften :20 seconds in a microwave using defrost mode. 

18g

Melted butter for brushing after baking

 

#I always use all purpose flour. 

1.  Put * ingredients in order except *the flour in a big bowl and mix. Add *the flour and mix. Set aside.

2.手順2の写真  LEFT: Put whole wheat flour and salt in a midium bowl. Right: set the butter in a small bowl. Top: No.1.

3. 手順3の写真 Put the flour and salt mixture in the food processor and hit pulse 5.6 times until combine.

4. 手順4の写真Add *dough mixture and the butter run until combine about 40 seconds or so.

5. 手順5の写真Take the dough out from the food processor, and clean *dough mixture bowl. Put the dough back in the food processor and run until combine.

6.手順6の写真Time to knead by hand for 15 minutes.  Push it down and stretch and fold and repeat over and over. This is very important to get strong gluten development.

7.手順7の写真Put some shortening on a large bowl, and place the dough in. Proof at 28℃ or 32F  for 50 minutes or until the loaf double in size.

8.Punch down to degas gently,Turn the dough onto a counter and divide in 2 and shape. ( It is much better to have beautiful loaf when you measure it) rest for 20 minutes.]

9. Shape : Both oval's height should be around 20cm. * pinch very well!

.手順9の写真

手順2の写真: Japanese bakery way

手順1の写真: My way: to have taller loaf.  Rolling on the second process. Take a look below.

手順10の写真

 

 

10. Place each of the dough in a loaf pan like the picture below.( It will rise equally)

手順9の写真

11.Pace the dough have equal space in the pan.

手順10の写真: Japanese bakery way ( This picture is white sandwich bread version →http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/19174/54-whole-wheat-sandwich-bread)

手順12の写真 :My way

12. Proof at 38℃ or 100F  until the dough rises up a little over  the top of the pan. ( around 1.2 hours for 100% whole wheat bread and 1hour for 85% whole wheat bread) * The time is vary depends on the temprature.

 

13.Preheat the oven to 200℃ or 400F.  Decrease 180℃ or 350F and bake for 30 minutes.

手順14の写真

14.Drop the pan with the loaf onto a ground about 15cm height to give the dough shock, and remove it immediately from the pan and cool on a rack for at least 1 hour or so, before slicing or serving. ( * Optional: Brush melted butter on the surface.)

100% whole wheat bread

85% whole wheat bread

gothicgirl's picture
gothicgirl

Posted on Evil Shenanigans on 3/23/2010 

I think pita bread may be magic.

Honey Wheat Pita Bread   

Not that it will grant wishes or anything, but I think the way it goes from thin, flat dough into a hearty pocket of bread fascinating.  Aside from the fascination factor, the versatility of pita bread is endless.  Stuff them with lunch meat for a sandwich, top them with sauce and cheese for a pizza, or bake them until crisp for chips.  Yes, the pita is very versatile.

Honey Wheat Pita Bread 

Notes on this recipe ...  First, they come out best if you can bake them on a raging hot pizza stone or cast iron skillet.  The stone, or skillet, should be heated for at least thirty minutes before baking for the best, and most puffy, results.  Second, these pita are made with whole wheat graham flour because it has the nutty flavor I wanted for this recipe, but if you do not have that standard whole wheat flour will work just as well.  Third, kept in a plastic bag the pita last for up to four days at room temperature.   

Honey Wheat Pita Bread   Yield 8 pita

1 cup whole wheat graham flour
2 cups all purpose flour
2 1/4 teaspoons dry active yeast
1 1/2 cups water, heated to 110 F
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
1 tablespoon honey
1 tablespoon canola oil

In a large measuring cup combine the water and yeast.  Let stand for ten minutes, until foamy.

Honey Wheat Pita Bread Honey Wheat Pita Bread

In the bowl of a stand mixer combine the yeast mixture, both flours, salt, honey, and oil.  Mix on low speed for three minutes then check to make sure the dough is not too liquid, but it should be sticky to the touch.  Mix on medium speed for five minutes.  Cover with plastic and let rise until double in bulk, about an hour.

Heat the oven to 475 F with a pizza stone, or 9″ or larger iron skillet, for thirty minutes.

Honey Wheat Pita BreadHoney Wheat Pita BreadHoney Wheat Pita BreadHoney Wheat Pita Bread

Once the dough has risen turn out onto a floured surface and press out the excess gas.  Divide the dough into eight equal pieces.  Roll the dough into balls then cover with a towel and allow to rest for twenty minutes.

Honey Wheat Pita Bread Honey Wheat Pita Bread Honey Wheat Pita Bread Honey Wheat Pita Bread 

Once rested roll the dough into a thin circle, about 1/8″ thick.  Place the dough on the heated pizza stone and bake for 3-4 minutes, until golden brown and puffed.  Cover the baked pita with a clean towel and repeat with the remaining dough.

Honey Wheat Pita Bread 

Enjoy!

Honey Wheat Pita Bread

Stephanie Brim's picture
Stephanie Brim

I actually put this together, meaning to for a while, after dmsnyder mentioned Suas's whole wheat. This is my first try at a truly 100% whole wheat bread and both Adam, my husband, and I think it's a keeper, but with one change: it needs more honey.

Soaker

  • 200g whole wheat flour
  • 115g white whole wheat flour
  • 35g gluten flour
  • 260g milk

Biga

  • 200g whole wheat flour
  • 150g water
  • 5g instant yeast

Final Dough

  • all of the soaker
  • all of the biga
  • 50g butter
  • 55g honey (we think that 80g would have been better)
  • 12g salt
  • 25g milk

Method:

Put soaker ingredients together in a bowl and thoroughly combine. Set aside. Put biga ingredients together in a bowl and thoroughly combine. Place plastic wrap over both bowls and let alone for an hour or so. Mine went for a little over since I was feeding Alexander at the time.

To mix the final dough, break both the soaker and biga up into small pieces and place into the bowl of a stand mixer. Add all other ingredients and mix on low until everything is incorporated into the dough, then medium-low for 3-4 minutes until the dough no longer sticks to the sides of the bowl. Place in a bowl for bulk ferment.

During bulk ferment I did 2 letter stretch and folds. I don't really think I needed to as the dough seemed to be very elastic, but I wanted to be sure. Allow to double after the second stretch and fold if you decide to do it. Overall, the dough got a 2 hour ferment.

Cut into two pieces and shape into loaves. This worked for 1 loaf sandwich bread and about 4 rolls. Baked at 350 degrees for about 30 minutes, then went down to 325 for 10 minutes. I took the rolls out before turning the temperature down.

This is soft, light, and perfect for sandwiches. Both my husband and I like the fact that it isn't too heavy, yet it's 100% whole wheat. Considering the fact that none of my projects have been going completely right lately, this success (and one other that I'll mention on my other blog once I've figured it out *without* it being a slight accident) makes me feel good again.

Now I think I can tackle David's San Joaquin Sourdough. ;)

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