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News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

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4akitchenblog's picture
4akitchenblog

Hi all,

I am new here and this is my first post on The Fresh Loaf!

Today I would like to share my first attempt at baking Sourdough Boule with Japanese Clay Pot.

Japanese Clay Pot (a.k.a. Donabe) is a symbol of comfort food for Japanese people.

(Oh, by the way, I am Japanese :-))

Family members or friends come together around the table and share a meal out of one pot, so that you can build a sense of closeness, warmness...

I live in Santa Monica, California and my all family members live in Japan...Therefore, I felt all warm inside when I happened to find this Donabe.

"I want to bake BREAD with this clay pot!"

This idea just popped in my head :-)

 

The best part of using a clay pot (of course, a cast-iron pan, too) is you don't need to create the steam in your oven.

Because a closed clay pot trap all of the moisture from the dough, and that creates STEAM you need to get a perfect crust!

It's like a "masonry oven" inside your oven, if you will.

 

Ok, let's bake Donabe-bread!

This is a Sourdough Boule made with 36 hours fermentation.

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Sourdough Boule

Makes 1 small loaf

Submitting this post to YeastSpotting

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Recipe

225 g Bread flour

162 g water

4 g Salt

67.5 g 60% Firm sourdough starter

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Formula

266.3 g Bread Flour (100%)

188.3 g Water (70%)

4.8 g Salt (1.8% )

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Directions

1. Making the preferment dough --- In a mixing bowl, combine Bread Flour, Water and Sourdough seed starter / culture. 

    Let it preferment at room temperature for 12 hours.

2. Meanwhile, mix flour and water, cover it with plastic and Autolyse for for 12 hours.

3. Next day, mix starter into the dough and slap & fold for 1 minute.

4. Add salt and slap & fold for 1 minute or until the dough becomes a rough ball.

5. Let it rest for  30 minutes.

6. 1 set Stretch & Fold (1 set = right over left, left over right, bottom over top, top over bottom)

7. Let it rest for  30 minutes.

8. 1 set Stretch & Fold

9. Let it rest for  30 minutes.

10. 1 set Stretch & Fold

11. At a cooler place, let it rise until the dough just starts showing the yeast activity, about a third in size.

12. Put it in the fridge for 18-24 hours.

13. Pull it out of the fridge and leave it out for 1 hour.

14. Pre-shape the dough and let it rest for 15 minutes.

15. Shape into Boule and place into a mixing bowl lined with well-floured tea towel, seam-side up.

❉ Since I didn't have a round banneton, I used a mixing bowl lined with a tea towel and it just worked very well!

16. Final fermentation for 60 - 90 minutes.

17. 1 hour before you plan to bake, place your Donabe / Closed clay pot (must be completely DRY) on the middle shelf in the oven and preheat to 500°F.

 

18. Flip the bowl over so that the dough sits on the middle of a parchment paper.

19. Score the top of the Boule using a lame or a sharp, serrated knife.

20. Very very carefully open the lid (it's HOT!) and put the bread in the preheated Donabe, replace the lid and slip it back into the oven.

21. Turn the heat down to 480°F and bake the bread for 30 minutes with lid.

22. Turn the heat down to 450°F and bake for 10-15 minutes without lid.

23. Once the boule is nicely brown, turn the heat off and remove the boule from the Donabe and place directly on a rack in the oven for another 5-10 minutes.

24. Let them cool onto a rack.

Here is my first Donabe-Bread!

It turned out super nice! I got an amazing crust and silky-fluffy-holey crumb.

To be honest, I was quite surprised by this result. 

Even though I knew this "closed clay pot (La Cloche)" method through this post on a website BREAD IN FIVE,

I was not sure if I could get the same result with this Japanese Donabe or not...

No baking stone? No steam? Really?!

Yes, it really works! Donabe-bread is a new comfort food for me!

Yuko



MNBäcker's picture

Thicker Yogurt?

May 10, 2012 - 7:14am -- MNBäcker
Forums: 

Hi, all.

I am hoping there are some people on the list who maybe make their own yougurt along with baked goods.

I have been making my own for a while - pretty straightforward. In the past, I have added a couple of packets of gelatin (boiled shortly in a little water and then stirred into the hot milk) to my half-gallon of milk, and it really did the trick to thicken the yogurt. HOWEVER, I am now looking to see if a plant-based thickening agent, such as Agar, might be able to do the same job.

EvillyChic's picture

Recreation of the mysterious Bánh mì baguette

April 29, 2012 - 2:24am -- EvillyChic

Hello,

Here in this post, I would describe how I make Bánh mì in my own way, which suitable for home bakers, who share the same dream of conquering this challenge to successfully recreate the mysterious Bánh mì baguette.


Below is how I make Bánh mì baguette. (6 loaves, 75g per loaf)

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Utensils needed

Jean-Paul's picture

I made homemade butter... it's toooo easy and the thanksgiving guests would love to watch this!

November 14, 2010 - 8:13pm -- Jean-Paul

For thanksgiving we decided to make our own homemade butter. I found a recipe, and it's almost as easy as making icecubes. If you haven't tried it, definately give it a whirl... it's literally way too easy!


Ingredients: heavy cream, refridgerator cold (we found that 1 quart of cream will give you 12 oz of butter)

vmarrs's picture
vmarrs

My doctor has me on the sureslim supervised diet and I am allowed no more than 19 carbs in my bread per day.  I can't stand to purchase bread since I have been making it for 37 years.  I'm not diabetic.  sourdough is not really a favorite, so I am hoping someone out there can help me with a recipe suggestion. 

sdionnemoore's picture

Peach Cobbler Bread

August 12, 2009 - 8:58pm -- sdionnemoore
Forums: 

I'm so excited! I love cinnamon raisin bread but wanted to experiment. My friend had just cut up four peaches that weren't very sweet and were turning brown in the refrigerator. What to do, what to do? I decided to try and simulate peach cobbler, which is what we originally considered doing with the peaches. I tweaked and added a few things to a basic cinnamon-raisin bread recipe. The bread came out wonderfully sweet and would have easily made delicious individual peach-cinnamon cobbler rolls. It made two loaves.

lbw648's picture
lbw648

The following are the ingredients that are used in my recipe for 1 batch (3 loaves) of homemade sourdough bread:

6 cups bread flour
1/3 cup sugar
1 ½ cups warm starter
1 cup warm water
1/2 cup vegetable oil
1 tablespoon salt
1 envelope regular yeast

Today, I purchased a 1lb. block of Fleishman's Instant Dry Yeast. I need to know how much of the IDY to use that would be the equivalent of the single envelope of regular yeast. Also, is IDY the same thing as the rapid rise? If so, after the bread dough is blended, do I go ahead and divide it into 3 loaf pans for only one rising? Please respond to lbw648@hotmail.com. THANK YOU !!!!!!!!!!

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