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civick22@gmail.com's picture

Question: Pourable Pita

May 2, 2012 - 11:02pm -- civick22@gmail.com
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Hi Everyone!

So i was recently in greece and saw this guy making fresh pita for his gyro store. 

The pita was made on a griddle and was poured on (he made a premade mix, just like how you would find one of pancakes made)

 

Any ideas of how to do this?  anyone have a recipe? instructions? videos?

i grill/rottiserie meat all the time... and the concept of being able to produce fresh pita (pourable) and still have it soft and chewy warms me up inside!!!

 

your help/assistance would be greatly appreciated!  thanks!!!

Balazs's picture
Balazs

Hello,

Few days ago, I was thinking what to do next day for lunch. I opened the fridge and found a pound of chicken breast fillet. On shelf has gyros spice in a small bottle. Hoorray! I do gyros. And pita bread of course. :)

Well, here is my pita bread.

UPDATE! Method is added.

 

 

Components of the dough for 4 pieces
200 grams of flour
0.75 teaspoon of yeast and salt
0.5 spoon of honey or sugar
0.5 cup of water (+0.25 cups if need it)
1 spoon of olive oil

 

 

Mix all components in a bowl and knead it. Rest the dough for 90 minutes. Then cut to four equal parts, shape a small ball and cover with kitchentowels. When balls rieses doubled, roll them out and put hot baking tray and bake for 5-8 minutes in 250°C.

Pita not be reversed on baking tray. If pita's top goes to brown than pita is ready.

 

 

 

Pita wasn't enough because of my two friends visited me and they also wanted eat gyros. :)

 

Balázs

ehanner's picture
ehanner

I have tried my hand at various recipes for Greek bread over the last couple years. People who visit Greece rave about the wonderful bread and I long to create such a loaf. David (Dmsnyder) has posted his latest improvement which I tried today with a couple of minor modifications. I won't re-post the recipe as David's is all you need to make this wonderful bread.


As David suggested, I lowered the oven temperature to 430F from the beginning. I made two full batches and on the second pair of loaves, I lowered the temp to 420 after 20 minutes and continued for another 20 minutes. After the 40 minutes baking time, I left the breads in the oven with the door ajar for another 5 minuets to harden the crust. The color is less dark, more towards golden although it looks darker in the photo. The crumb image is of the first loaf that was baked more boldly. The second two loaves are destined to be delivered to my son for his Greek dinner with friends.


The inclusion of Durum flour adds a very nice nutty note to the aroma. I almost feel as if I am smelling or tasting the sesame seeds on the outside. The Durum lends an unusual flavor. It is most delicious. The crumb is open well enough and the cells are gelatinous. The dough was 7.3 Lbs in total divided into 4 parts, mixed by hand and folded twice during the 2-1/2 hours of fermenting and proofed in round linen lined baskets. I pinched the dough while in the baskets across the sides to make them oval just before turning on to the flipper board. I spritzed the dough and sprinkled the seeds over all before slashing.


This is a terrific bread. The added honey helps it brown early. Next time I will start at 420F for 40-45 minutes to an internal temp of 205F.


Eric




ehanner's picture
ehanner

I've never had really good Greek bread. But, I have heard enough about how great it is that I've been interested in working on it for some time. When dsnyder and I were discussing the formula a while back, he let on he has a daughter-in-law from Greece and maybe she would help tune this up to a respectable loaf.


Here is Davids posting of the improved version, after experimenting with his DIL.


I followed Davids suggestions except for the mixing and folding. I mixed in my DLX after a 30 minute rest, for a total of 3 minutes, using the roller. Then I folded it 3 times in a bowl over the next 3 hours as it fermented. It was a silky smooth dough, very nice to handle. After dividing in two and pre shaping, I tightened the boules and placed them in linen lined baskets for proofing. It took 1-1/2 hours for the proof and the dough temp was 74F.


I also added a few drops of toasted sesame oil to the dough, hoping to get some of that great aroma and boost the lightly toasted seeds on the surface. I'm afraid I would say the desired effect of the oil was not realized. There is a definate sesame aroma but I think it's from the seeds.


After reading Davids comments about his oven temperature and the brown color he got, I thought I would start with 430F and reduce to 410 when I rotated the loaves. The crust color isn't as dark as it appears. I like the color but I also think it could be a little more golden and less orange/brown. A lower and slower bake perhaps.


There is a little bitterness in the taste I'm not sure about. I don't have a lot of experience with Durum flour. Does anyone know if that is normal with Durum?  My daughter was bugging me to cut it so after 20 minutes I relented and had her carve it up. There isn't a hint of sweetness, with 2 T of honey, I'm a little surprised.


Eric






Erzsebet Gilbert's picture

Greek Fennel, Yogurt, & Honey Bread (a traveler returns to her oven!)

October 1, 2009 - 2:36am -- Erzsebet Gilbert
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Hello to all the bakers and Loafers!  I'd posted about 5 months ago about my upcoming camping journey around the Mediterranean, and received so much wonderful advice...  I can't thank everybody enough for their kind, helpful ideas, or begin to tell all the traveling tales.  


Apart from a broken camp stove (aaah!) I did discover a number of fantastic, unique local breads, but I will have to wait to post some pictures and descriptions of those (though I promise I will!)...

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