The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Gluten

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mbutcher's picture

Dough ball going slack durring kneeding

July 14, 2010 - 9:46am -- mbutcher

So here I am minding my own business enjoying making 30 loaves of bread and all of a sudden my dough goes slack after 5 min of kneeding. Dough holds a ball untill then but goes slack and holds to the bottom of the bowl. Recipe calls for 10 grain soaker to be added after forming the dough gluten. Any suggestions?

Newfieguy's picture

Gluten question on a Tuesday Morning

July 6, 2010 - 8:45am -- Newfieguy

Hello all!


Quick question.


If you were to take a standard loaf of multi grain bread, yeast mixture, WW flour, salt, the basics and make two batches.


One with added gluten and one without added gluten, what would be the difference in the two breads most noticeably?


I just recieved an order of gear from plesant hill grains and I saw they had gluten there so I picked up a pack or two.  Just not sure what the difference would be in the normal loaves I make.

ehanner's picture
ehanner

Just recently, Mariana-Aga, a fellow baker who I have great respect for and who is an occasional poster here, presented a very interesting paper with extensive photos on the development of gluten. For the purposes of her research and documentation she used a food processor to mix and develop, then over develop the dough. All of the various stages are carefully documented and you can see the tell tale signs of the dough being over worked and ruined.


 This experiment shows what over kneading will do to your dough. It is also possible to over develop your dough by simply over fermenting it, either at room temperature or in the refrigerator. We have all had a dough turn slack and sticky from not being attended to in the proper time.In fact unless you use a food processor, it is very hard to mechanically over develop or over mix your dough at home. The mixers most home bakers use are not capable of over mixing unless you take a long nap while mixing.


If you don't learn anything more from this great post other than to finally know that there is no fixing it if you get in this situation. I have tried adding more flour to the extreme, and it never works. You may as well resign yourself that this will never be right and toss it in the compost.


If you have seen this, you know what I'm talking about!


And finally, I learned a nice trick for cleaning that unbelievably sticky gooey dough mess from my bowls and hands. This alone is reason enough to visit this very informative blog post by Mariana.. I hope some of you find it as interesting as I have.


Eric


PS: This page is written in Russian. Google Translate had no trouble translating to English.

ohsoretro's picture

Best Bread Machine (for Gluten Free recipes)?

September 2, 2009 - 5:19pm -- ohsoretro
Forums: 

Hi All --


 


I was wondering if anyone had any opinions or advice on which machine would be best for baking gluten free bread? I'm looking for one that would let me put my ingredients in the same way a regular loaf is made instead of premixing it in a bowl and dumping it in the breadmachine to bake as I've seen mentioned on blogs. Basically I hate mixing GF dough. :)


 


I'm always looking for new GF bread/biscuit recipes if anyone has any to share.


 


Thanks so much!


 

Mylissa20's picture

Predigestion and gluten strength

August 18, 2009 - 9:17pm -- Mylissa20
Forums: 

I have started using a predigestion for my WW loaves to compensate for phytic acid, but I seem to be having trouble getting a good rise out of my loaves.  My predigestions have been approx 12-14 hours with 3, 45 min rises after adding the additional ingredients.  Has anyone else had any problems with this? I am wondering if the 14 hours is great for dealing with phytic acid but perhaps breaks down the gluten too much for average sized WW loaves.  Thoughts?

par's picture

Question about gluten

May 22, 2009 - 10:22am -- par
Forums: 

Hi Everyone,


Newbye here.


I had little success with my first couple of loafs, as they were quite heavy and dense - i thought could this be fault of my flour?


I found data about my used flour (405D), which says "amount of gluten" 25-27%, and this flour is extreemly small dense and white (so called extra quality)


Would changing flour change quality of my bread? When i was buying this flour i looked for the most expensive one, but now i think this could be mistake?


 


 


 

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